Leading article Australia

Shorten’s integrity trick

3 February 2018

9:00 AM

3 February 2018

9:00 AM

Now that same-sex marriage is out of the way, the banking royal commission hastily agreed to, and the Australia Day shenanigans shelved for another twelve months, Bill Shorten was in desperate need of a shiny, new political distraction. This has two key purposes: the first being to keep voters from asking awkward questions such as what specific policies will Labor be promoting this coming year designed to grow our economy, attract business to our shores and increase our productivity (answer: none), or, equally embarrassingly, how is it that Labor’s heavily-hyped ‘ACME Dual-Citizenship Prevention Kit’ so obviously didn’t work as promised?

The second goal of this glittering new distraction is to give the so-called luvvies, those left-leaning voters who crave fabricated morality tales in order to feed their unquenchable sense of outrage, a new cause to clamber on to.

What could better suit the inner-city leftist mindset than an undemocratically-appointed bunch of like-minded ‘progressive’ individuals (celebrities, activists, those of a ‘diverse’ skin colour or sex, ex-politicians of the correct viewpoints, academics etc.) to laud it over our democratically-elected leaders (ie those voted in by rednecks, tradies, greedy business folk, conservatives, bogans etc)?

Because, make no mistake; this ploy will become a focus for tedious leftist whining about the ‘corruption’ of our political masters, fuelling endless conspiracy theories of institutional malfeasance. No doubt there are some wrong-doers out there, but the experience of powerful, unbridled Commissions is not a pretty one in this country.

Whether it be the Human Rights Commission and their persecution of Bill Leak, Andrew Bolt and the four QUT students, or their absurd Bringing Them Home Report that invented the ‘genocide’ of indigenous Australians, or the sinister persecution of the likes of Margaret Cunneen and others at the hands of NSW’s ICAC, what we repeatedly see is a rush to assume guilt over innocence and to permanently smear professional reputations.


And of course, these quangos always end up being stacked by the Left’s favoured sons and daughters. Ms Triggs, anyone? Malcolm Turnbull is a fool to pussy-foot around with this dangerous Labor ploy.

We should be so lucky

Australia would be lucky to have a leader prepared to both run on and then to implement sound common-sense policies à la  Donald Trump.

Not for the President to plead the usual excuse that the budgetary situation was far worse than expected. Nor for him to roll over under the combined onslaught of treacherous bureaucrats, politicised judges, an agenda-driven media, unsupportive Republicans In Name Only colleagues and Democrats bent on impeachment from Day 1. Instead he has had an extraordinarily successful first year, with every indication that he may indeed make America great again.

Mr Trump’s successes put our own political achievements of the last twelve months to shame. Whilst we have dilly-dallied around with cultural fads, America is surging ahead economically. The US stockmarket is booming, jobs are being created (real ones, not phony taxpayer-funded NDIS ones) and wages are growing dramatically; illegal immigration has slowed and, finally, America is asserting itself against the bullies, such as the fraudulent, corrupt Palestinian leadership. Not to mention Little Rocket Man.

Supporting Israel unequivocally has been a critical step towards some kind of  Middle East peace, unimaginable under Mr. Trump’s hapless predecessor, as was his withdraw from the pointless Paris Agreement on climate change.

With so many achievements under his belt, it’s about time that the President was allowed to govern. Apart from the opposition of activist judges, the lacklustre republican establishment has been too inclined to think Russian collusion would bring him down. But not a skerrick of evidence of this has been found by the now compromised Mueller investigation. Indeed, there’s far more evidence of this in the Clinton camp.

With extreme political partisanship revealed in both the FBI and Department of Justice, and with revelations concerning the improper conduct of the Clinton investigation, the proposal by the House Intelligence Committee to publish a memorandum on the abuse of the wiretap process is timely. The resulting scandal could be bigger than Watergate. Regardless, it will bring things to a head and hopefully allow the President to govern.

Our own leaders might do better if they spent a bit more time emulating, rather than denigrating, Mr Trump.

Subscribe to The Spectator Australia today for a quality of argument not found in any other publication. Get more Spectator Australia for less – just $20 for 10 issues


Show comments
Close