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Arts

The art of the football shirt

Part canvas, part sandwich board, club kits don’t always work – but their designs can be addictive

28 October 2017

9:00 AM

28 October 2017

9:00 AM

The early 1970s was football’s brute era of Passchendaele pitches and Stalingrad tactics. The gnarled ruffians of Leeds United — wee hatchet man Billy Bremner, the graceful assassin Johnny Giles, Norman ‘Bites Yer Legs’ Hunter — embodied the age. Not that you’d guess this from the badge on the club’s shirt: the letters LU were styled into a grinning emoji in goofy yellow.

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