Features

Generation Snowflake: how we train our kids to be censorious cry-babies

4 June 2016

9:00 AM

4 June 2016

9:00 AM

Another week, another spate of barmy campus bans and ‘safe space’ shenanigans by a new breed of hyper–sensitive censorious youth. At Oxford University, law students are now officially notified when the content of a lecture might upset them. In Cambridge, there were calls for an Africa-themed end-of-term dinner to be cancelled just in case it caused offence to someone somewhere. It all seems beyond parody. ‘What is wrong with these thin-skinned little emperors?’ we cry. But while we can harrumph and sneer at Generation Snowflake’s antics, we miss a crucial point: we created them.

First, it is important to note that young people who cry offence are not feigning hurt — generational fragility is a real phenomenon. Speaking at numerous school and university events in recent years, I’ve noticed an increasingly aggrieved response from my young audience to any argument I put forward that they don’t like. They are genuinely distressed by ideas that run contrary to their worldview. Even making a general case for free speech can lead to gasps of disbelief. But why do they take everything so personally? The short answer is: because we socialised them that way.

Why are we surprised that teenagers demand safe spaces? Historically, adolescents might have been risk-takers and adventure-seekers, but today we rear children to perceive the world as an endlessly scary place. NGOs and charities, in particular, promote panic, arguing that what used to be called puppy fat is childhood obesity and will lead to premature death, while those sugary drinks the young love to swig are ‘kids’ crack cocaine’. Reared on a diet of disaster hyperbole, it’s no wonder children grow up scared of their own shadows.

Today, parents go to ludicrous lengths to eliminate all risk from their children’s lives. Inevitably this narrows their horizons and teaches them to be less daring. Health-and-safety mania means the young are denied resilience-building freedoms that past generations enjoyed, such as playing outdoors, climbing trees and walking to school unaided. Modern mollycoddling means that pupils have been prevented from engaging in activities such as leapfrog, marbles and conkers. Three in ten schools have banned the playground game British bulldog. Last week, a headmistress in Dundee suggested changing the colour of her school’s red uniform because ‘some research indicates that it can increase heart and breathing rates’. In March, there were moves to ban tackling in school rugby matches due to the perils of this ‘high-impact collision sport’.

Even more damaging is a child–protection industry that actively encourages children to see potential abuse everywhere. Safeguarding has become the top priority in every organisation that works with children, to the extent that parents are banned from taking photographs of their own children at swimming galas and are let into many parks only ‘if accompanied by a child’. In 2010, Home Secretary Theresa May seemed to recognise that things had gone too far and promised to ‘scale back’ egregious criminal–record checks. But little has been done. Why do we wonder that today’s students see abuse in so many of their interactions, when they have been brought up to view every stranger they meet as a threat?

The anti-bullying industry, too, has grown exponentially over the past 20 years. If the word ‘bullying’ makes you think of children having their heads kicked in and their dinner money nicked, or being subjected to systematic cruelty, then think again. Self-styled anti-bullying experts have expanded definitions of bullying to include ‘teasing and name–calling’, ‘having your stuff messed about with’, ‘spreading rumours’, ‘verbal sexual commentary’, ‘homophobic taunting’, ‘graffiti’, ‘insensitive jokes’, ‘bullying gestures’ and ‘exclusion from friendship groups’ (i.e. falling out with your mates or being ignored by other kids).

Anti-bullying policies are a statutory obligation in schools and children are subjected to an endless stream of anti-bullying assemblies, activities, books, dramas and stories of celebrity victims. This propaganda encourages children to examine all their interactions through the prism of bullying and pathologises normal childish transgressions and tensions.

Anti-bullying campaigns assure the young that speech is interchangeable with physical violence and can cause long-term psychological damage. We should be teaching children how to surmount and survive everyday obstacles. Yet Sarah Brennan, chief executive of a charity called YoungMinds, declares that if such ‘devastating and life-changing’ bullying isn’t dealt with, it ‘can lead to years of pain and suffering that go on long into adulthood’.

Such sensationalist messages about the traumatic consequences of bullying can, counter-productively, encourage young people to overreact to events and develop acute anxiety about what are merely words, however horrible. ‘Kids are taking their lives not because they are being attacked by violent gangs, but because they can’t tolerate being insulted,’ the American psychologist Israel Kalman says. And schools, under the guidance of bullying experts, are unwittingly encouraging children to be upset: they have replaced the ending of the original ‘sticks and stones’ slogan with ‘but words can scar me for ever’ or, worse still, ‘but words can kill me’.

So when today’s undergraduates get insulted, are they going to think, ‘No big deal; it’s only words’? No. They are going to think, ‘Oh, no, I’m being insulted! Words can kill me!’

We should hardly be shocked that students reared on such doctrine claim that seeing a statue of Cecil Rhodes affects them as keenly as would an act of violence. Nor when they wail that the words of everyone from Germaine Greer to Peter Tatchell cause them actual harm. By the time they get to university, our overprotected children are so loaded up with emotional angst that they are ill-equipped to deal with the basic challenges of adult life.

We may greet news stories about students no-platforming speakers or banning Mexican hats with the cry ‘the youth’s gone mad’. But the sad fact is that we are encouraging a whole generation to perceive itself as mentally ill. The Higher Education Funding Council for England has estimated that the number of students declaring that they suffer from a mental health problem has increased 132 per cent over four years. I don’t doubt the sincerity of those students reporting severe symptoms of depression. That is what is most worrying: they really are overstressed and unable to cope. Even exams — which you might think essential to student life — are often cited as heaping far too much pressure on the young. Natasha Devon, until recently the Department for Education’s mental health champion, criticised increased testing in schools, saying it was ‘not a coincidence’ that anxiety is the ‘fastest-growing illness in under-21s’.

One conundrum presents itself when it comes to Generation Snowflake: how its apparent hypersensitivity is often combined with an almost belligerent sense of entitlement. ‘Validate our subjective, wounded feelings, or else,’ they seem to cry. But again, this attitude can be traced to how we have brought them up. Throughout their schooling, children are placed centre stage, as the self-esteem movement stalks educational theory and practice.

The government may have axed Ms Devon for going too far in her arguments against competitive testing, but they should have known what they were getting when they hired the co-founder of a mental-health charity called ‘Self-Esteem Team’. Self-esteem’s schmaltzy tropes encourage a narcissistic, self-orientated ‘me, me, me’ generation (‘Love the skin you’re in’, ‘Ego-boosting tips on reaffirming your self-worth’, ‘Write down ten amazing things about yourself every morning’, ‘Become your own best friend’). And self-esteem culture encourages adults to tiptoe around children’s sensitivities and accede to their opinions, lest we damage their wellbeing.

The US-based National Association of School Psychologists published a much-cited paper on how parents and schools can boost self-esteem in children: ‘Adults must listen carefully to the child without interrupting, and should not tell the child how to feel.’ Meanwhile, the charity Family Lives tells parents ‘not to label, criticise or blame your child, as this would give them negative messages which… can have a detrimental impact on their emotional wellbeing later on in life’.

So there we have it. There is no mystery to the absurdities of the Stepford Student. Nor should we wonder at their sudden appearance. We — adult society — protect children from criticism and suspend our critical judgment in order to massage their self-esteem. We scare them rigid by ‘catastrophising’ an endless list of fears. We make them hypervigilant about potential abuse from adults and their peers. We encourage them to equate abusive words with physical violence. And we have, in short, shaped our own overanxious, easily offended, censoriously thin-skinned Frankenstein monster. We created Generation Snowflake.

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Claire Fox is the director of the Institute of Ideas, and author of I Find That Offensive!


Show comments
  • Rik

    Bring back National Service with nice shouty Drill Sergeants,that’ll sort the snowflakes out double quick!!

    • AWoLsco

      “that’ll sort the snowflakes out double quick!!”

      Never a truer word spoken!

    • Frank Marker

      Can you imagine some lad after being balled out by a sergeant major on the drill square demanding his ‘safe space’.

      • gunnerbear

        Why not….the lad or young lady could simply ‘refuse to soldier’….surely HM Forces want people who want to be there….not are forced to be……

        • Frank Marker

          It was an attempt at humour, but never mind… I am actually anti National Service. A lot of the blokes I served with in the ‘voluntary army’ turned into rather sad sacks of human beings when they returned to civvy street.

    • gunnerbear

      The siren call of the ‘well it was always better in the olden days’ provided of course you weren’t the one getting maimed or killed in Malaya et al or were homosexual or didn’t want your time wasted by being forced in to HM Forces (to be trained by people who in the main didn’t want you there anyway). I find it notable that for all the spiel about useful National Service was, the RN – though hugely short of manpower – fought tooth and nail to keep NS personnel out of the Senior Service…….

  • Andy C

    “Generation Snowflake”: love it!

  • Nodrog

    I blame mobile phones.

  • Ratty Dave

    One of the best things my Mum did for me was tell me “Life isn’t fair” when I moaned about my sister getting something I didn’t. Resilience is a quality worth developing early on.

    • Donafugata

      There used to be a master at Eton who’d throw a blanket over the heads of a group of boys and thrash their bare legs to demonstrate the unfairness of life.

      • gunnerbear

        I think in posh schools they describe that as character building….after all one of them became our current PM and look at his character…..

  • sebastian2

    A friend of mine told me this. When a child, he was “bullied” (not much more than horseplay actually) by someone in the street. He ran complaining to his father who was at the top of a ladder, painting window-frames. The response? “Well, hit the bugger back, then!” That was then.

    These days, we have a Primary School banning running in the playground – not healthy or safe. Science has become fraught with H&S anxieties and prohibitions over experiments.

    Awful.

    • SunnyD

      spot on – although I didn’t know it at the time I wrote it, what I posted would serve as a better addendum to your post than it does this article

      • sebastian2

        Disturbing how times and attitudes have altered. Are we any the better? Any the more robust? Any stronger? This is a genuine question as we face growing and vicious militancy from elsewhere. From cultures that admire and respect – and fear – the opposite of what we may have allowed ourselves to become.

        • SunnyD

          Indeed. I fear for the younger iPod generation who have been far too molly coddled as they are more likely to be unable to defend themselves against a potential future onslaught from backward cultures. For my part, I’ve lived through some tough times – and am thankful that this has been the case. Not only have they made me more appreciative of the comforts I now enjoy, they will also stand me in good stead should the times-a-change for the worse in years to come

    • gunnerbear

      “Science has become fraught with H&S anxieties and prohibitions over experiments.” Or more accurately the threat of ‘chancer parents’ who’ll be straight on to a mouthpiece if they and the mouthpiece think there’s cash in it….

      • sebastian2

        You are completely correct. Compensation for exaggerated or invented “injury” is the new Eldorado. Prospectors are lining up.

  • Teacher

    My dear husband and I spent years happily laughing at our silly children. Sometimes it was the only parental pleasure on offer when they were being gits. Seems to have toughtened them up no end.

  • stedman_dantes

    Hmm. I’m not 100% convinced that “we” “created” this generation; I think their emoting, their miserable, puny snivelling in the face of dissent, their fascism and urge to censor are all largely self-made and not far removed from how toddlers behaved.

    What’s happened is that the adult world has failed to kick them into shape, to tell them to grow the f#ck up, or to stay in their rooms until they’ve done so. They’re like children who tyrannise weak parents.

    • Stuck-Record

      I think it’s a bit of both.

      Also, there are clear indications that a great deal of the ‘distress’ is is cynically exploitative role-play. We have taught children that screaming and making a fuss gets them what they want.

      It’s not like humanity has not known this lesson for several hundred thousand years. We know that if you indulge children you get spoiled brats. Spoilt brats are aggressive, cowardly, whiny, bullying, wheedling and lying, cynically manipulative, emotionally shallow and parasitical.

      Children are also genetically programmed to copy behaviours that achieve ‘success’ in the society they are born into. In the same way that some children will become gangsters and bullies if born into crack-dealing neighbourhoods, we have created an environment in the West where children notice that a combination of whining, special pleading, professional victimhood and aggressive bullying is a pathway to success.

      And now liberals (who are responsible for this) are suddenly astonished to find themselves surrounded by adults behaving like that.

      You are correct in your solution to the problem: ZERO TOLERANCE.

      • gunnerbear

        “Spoilt brats are aggressive, cowardly, whiny, bullying, wheedling and lying, cynically manipulative, emotionally shallow and parasitical.” Hellfire….no wonder Mrs. Cameron is looking knackered all the time – what with her Dave getting so over-excited at everything…

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    • MikePage

      Some of the problem IS that they stay in their rooms.

      • Mary

        that’s because their rooms are entertainment centres – with every possible gadget known to man!

    • William Hoang

      I heard an interesting perspective that the working mum culture has led to higher numbers of kids being raised in daycare where there is one adult for every ten kids (I have no idea what the actual ratio is). The point is that these kids don’t get the same amount of attention as they potentially would from being raised by their parent so they have to compete with eachother for the limited attention of the daycare worker. They then employ strategies like throwing tantrums and hissy fits to fulfill their undersupplied need for attention and that attitude to human interaction stays with them for the rest of their lives assuming they aren’t challenged.

      • Ruthmeb

        Yes, it’s all those uppity women daring to have a life outside the home. Their fault. Why can’t they stay at home and sacrifice their futures, so that when Mr dumps them for a younger model he still retains all the power over the kids’ futures? Shame on them.
        /before you all jump, happily married for 30 years – and my mother had a full time job way back in the 70s. But I have eyes.

        • William Hoang

          Where did I say that women should be the ones to stay at home? If you choose to have a kid, yes you should be willing to sacrifice whatever obligations you have to ensure that your kid grows up to be a stable and independent member of society. How self-absorbed you must be to outsource your parenting responsibilities to someone less invested in your child’s future because of your ‘aspirations’, especially when the child had no choice in the matter about what environment they were born into. How about not having a kid before you achieve your goals, or have a kid first before your ovaries dry up and then pursue a career if you’re dead set on starting a family, just recognise the importance and responsibilities of bringing a life into the world instead of thinking about yourself.

          It’s also great that your anecdotal evidence confirms your worldview, congrats!
          If you’d like to read some of the literature, here is a study on 1,100 children
          https://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/documents/seccyd_06.pdf

      • John Smith

        You have it in one
        Easy to do but difficult to recover from

      • Agree. Without doubt the day orphanage has much to answer for

    • PrincessOfTheCrystal

      it’s funny because some of you guys are ACTUAL fascists, blaming immigrants for everything and wanting super aggressive foreign policy and generally advocating for traditional vaues and family structures. “fascist” doesn’t mean telling you that your opinion is bad and that you are a bad person for holding it.

      • Give our God Immortal Praise

        Stay out of the female toilets.

      • E.I.Cronin

        I do wish SJW’s bothered to research what Fascism actually means. Mussolini was a Socialist from cradle to grave. He was even named after famous Anarchist-Socialists. ‘Fascio’ was a synonym for unions. Big State. Nothing But the State. Ever Expanding and Invasive State – a Leftists paradise. Revolutionary Elite. Anti-Christian. Defender of the Proletariat. Contemporary Progressives share many of the basic drives of Fascism so I’d be careful using the word as an insult as you’re standing on common ground.

        Btw Trump has stated he will resist all Interventionist wars. 😉 And guess who wrecked Libya but instituted transgender friendly toilets across the USA?

        ps oppression – violence and abuse towards any individual is never acceptable. But nursing hatred and resentment towards mainstream society isn’t going to further the transgender cause. If you demand respect and understanding of your own experience, I suggest you try listening to the central issues affecting other people. Just a suggestion.

      • sparrow-hawk

        Hurt your “precious princess” feelings have we? Go find your safe space. Facts are hard for you we know, but here’s one: it’s caled the LAW OF SUPPLY AND DEMAND. It is the fundamental economic and social reality underlying all societies, everywhere, since the beginning of the world.

        Today we have UNLIMITED DEMAND on our housing resources, our National Health System, our schools, and our road space (which is getting saturated in provincial South England (which you no doubt never see). This is caused by MASS UNCONTROLLED IMMIGRATION due to EU membership.

        Unlike you, Professor Angus Dalgleith, world cancer expert, understands that our NHS is being BROUGHT TO ITS KNEES by mass uncontrolled immigration:

        http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/02/09/britains-health-service-on-its-knees-thanks-to-mass-migration-says-cancer-specialist/

        This mass uncontrolled immigration exists in NO OTHER COUNTRY ON EARTH outside of your darling EU. You cannot name a SINGLE COUNTRY that allows it from ONE of their neighbours, let alone 27 of them , soon to become 30, then 35, then…..who knows.

        But hey, go and get your safe space and curl up in your little safety blanket that protects you from reality. You know, the one that calls everyone who speaks TRUTH to you a “fascist”.

        BTW traditional family values & structures are the foundation of ALL societies in this world since the beginning of time – ALL of Africa, ALL of South America, ALL of Asia. But of course you can’t cope with this reality.

    • John Smith

      Its the generation that ‘benefitted from ‘daycare’, better known as baby farms

    • plainsdrifter

      ‘What’s happened is that the adult world has failed to kick them into shape.’

      That’s exactly what she is saying.

  • Norton Folgate

    It’s the educational establishments that are to blame, at least here in east London: http://bit.ly/1sSBaFo Oh, Lord, and I forgot about this one: http://bit.ly/224gdmB

  • anonuk

    George Carlin on the “self-esteem movement”:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G65bUrOJw2s

    Language may be NSFW in places.

  • Jojje 3000

    An oversized nanny-state has this urge to find anything frightening in everyday life.

  • JSC

    The current coddling fad that annoys me the most is the “cyber bullying is EVEN WORSE than physical bullying”. Because having the s**t kicked out of you and your head flushed down the toilet by someone that just stole your lunch money is obviously so much better than someone leaving a snarky comment on one of your Facebook pictures…

  • AdrianM

    This is what I call a ‘safe space’:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Q6BYV9k9c4

    • gunnerbear

      Actually, I think this is… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJaOdl3nLVg …and you can even hear the words and there is even a tune……

      • AdrianM

        This is not entirely about words… or tunes for that matter.

  • AdrianM
  • JJD

    An interesting piece, Claire, although I’d say you fall short on evidence. I’m a sympathetic reader, but were I an unsympathetic one, I don’t think I’d be convinced. To argue from cause to effect requires more evidence than you present here. And by evidence, I mean not only evidence of the existence of A or B, but also evidence of the causal connection between the two.

  • Frank Marker

    I watched an interview the dramatist John Osborne gave to Melvyn Bragg recently. Speaking, I think in the mid 90s, he was bemoaning the state of the country, the pop-updating of the New English Bible the lack of reticence etc. One thing he said really struck home, “Don’t you find people are so mealy-mouthed these days. I mean this thing about anything that slightly upsets a person is termed offensive. Well life is bloody offensive”!

  • MikePage

    There’s no doubt in my mind this imagined fragility is politically motivated: not “us” but the teachers.

  • Liberty

    It is not ‘us’ that did it, it was ‘them’ – the soft left educational, political, charity, media elite who feed of each others ideas to promote their own sense of self importance. As for me, and most people young and old I know the pointing out, sarcasm and give-as-good-as-you-get response to daftness is alive and well.

  • mohdanga

    test

  • mohdanga

    Most of this nonsense started with the implementation of mass immigration and multiculturalism; flood the country with non-assimilating “newcomers”, which the host population didn’t want, but the white guilt liberals did in order to assuage their “white man’s guilt, spend billions trying to assimilate them, blame/accuse the host population of being “racist”, “xenophobic”, “bigoted”, “Islamophobic” when they don’t assimilate, pander to their backward cultural enriching practices, set up “Human Rights Commissions'” to browbeat the host population into accepting restrictions on free speech and thought….all of which empowers the poor, downtrodden cultural enrichers to view themselves as “victims” and keep asking for more and more. Then every minority, special interest group jumps on the bandwagon and voila!!

  • Badger

    Any deviation from the narrative is punishable with prison or pariah status, and we wonder why the kids – indoctrinated by the state are shocked when they hear an opposing view. As a parent I’m busy countering the propaganda and brainwashing. This is down to our institutions being infested with people who do not have our interests at heart, they have an agenda.

  • SunnyD

    I’d go one further and suggest that the health and safety brigade have taken away our kids’ natural access to adrenaline…. getting an adrenaline rush is probably the first experience of a “high” we get as human beings… think of the games we played spinning around ten times and running off haphazardly in an attempt at a straight line… swings don’t go high enough and roundabouts don’t go round fast enough anymore… no wonder you read stories of kids taking drugs and “legal highs” and getting up to all sorts of shenanigans

    • E.I.Cronin

      That’s a very good point. There’s a lot to be said for the ‘benign neglect’ parenting method (popular pre-70’s). We rode off on our bikes with lunch and a drink and told to come back around dinner time. Childhood was one huge, and sometimes dangerous, adventure. If you got hurt or abused you had to deal with it. Adults were always a shout away if real trouble arose, but in general we were thrown back on our own resources.

      • SunnyD

        you hit the nail on the head. I remember going into the woods on harrow on the hill to “explore” and “play camp” – we found foxholes, even stumbled across harrow school and an wizened old groundskeeper who showed us his little shed (won’t say what we saw in there – suffice to say mostly men’s things lol) when I look back on it, it strikes me as something that would never happen nowadays.

        • E.I.Cronin

          Sounds like a wonderful childhood!. I think it’s fair to say kids are more supervised and protected today, and for some good reasons but it is at a cost. And I can’t remember my parents ever asking for my advice or having long complex discussions about my feelings and behavioural issues. There were 2 options – obey or a smack (until I could run faster than Dad).

        • sparrow-hawk

          My childhood was similar in Ealing. We were seldom home in the summer months, apart from to eat & sleep. Out alone or with our friends on our bikes exploring our environment. Catching sticklebacks with our nets in local ponds, cycling along the Grand Union Canal towpath into the countryside westwards, or deeper into London eastward. No adult supervision present or needed. No mobile phone contact. Our parents accepted it, because it was how THEY grew up. We were independent and free.

          No wonder so many of today’s kids are so pu$$ified they struggle to function with any emotional resilience.

          • SunnyD

            I still visit a mate in Perivale and take my current gf along the grand union for a little stretch of the legs….I’ve been meaning to take her to the Ballot Box up Horsenden Hill but somehow keep getting waylaid by other distractions…

      • SunnyD

        oh yeah, and our back door was always unlocked so we could let ourselves back in (as you say, around tea time!)

      • FrankS2

        “Adults were always a shout away if real trouble arose,”
        That’s the big difference between then (’50s, ’60s) and now – before the invention of ‘stranger danger’ c1982, the sensible advice to children going out without adult supervision was ‘if you need help ask an adult’. Now kids are taught that no adult can be trusted; and few adults will risk getting involved if a child asks for help. Children’s first line of defence in the world was thus removed.

        • E.I.Cronin

          Very true. I’ve noticed family and friends with young kids rarely leave them unattended. They certainly don’t have the freedom to play unsupervised like my generation, which is perhaps a change in child rearing ideology. But there seems to be a general slide towards social mistrust.

          • FrankS2

            “there seems to be a general slide towards social mistrust”
            True, but this particular undermining was – and is – officially endorsed. Children are now taught to view all adults with suspicion – a piece of presumably well-intentioned social policy with terrible consequences, eroding the trust on which society is built. It may have saved a few children from the clutches of evil people, but at a high price for children in general.

          • I lost a signet ring in Victoria park sandpit. Whilst playing wth nipper.

            Just try being the one lone fifty year old with a metal detector amongst the kids to know paranoid and assumption parents have got that we are all paedophile

          • E.I.Cronin

            Yes can imagine the glares! We’re all under suspicion now. As Frank said that loss of social trust has knocked down a first line of defence for children. No one wants to intervene or even enquire in public if things are ok.

    • Aberrant_Apostrophe

      Agreed. There’s also the parallel with the dramatic rise in allergies, which is strongly suspected to be caused by children not being exposed to the outside World enough. It’s all very well wrapping kids in cotton wool, but when in their late teens or even twenties they suffers anaphylactic shock and dies because some greedy restaurant owner substitutes ground peanuts for almonds in a curry, you wonder whether it was a wise move.

  • Badger

    Are Matthew Parris and Fraser Nelson now so unpopular that comments cannot be allowed on their articles?

  • NorBdelta

    I note that when you discussed the “uprising” you fell short of mentioning Milo who is primarily behind most of it. You should get him in for an interview. I am certain your readers would find him entertaining in the very least.

  • Mr Grumpy

    The generation that can’t remember a time before New Labour. Coincidence?

    • magi83

      I was born in 1983 so strictly speaking I am a millenial but I notice a significant difference between my generation and those in their late teens/early 20s today.

  • colchar

    ‘We’ did not create them. Some of us did, but not all.

  • colchar

    This column offends me. I demand a safe space full of rainbows and puppies.

    • Enoch Powell

      I am offended by the lack of Unicorns.

      • colchar

        I was going to ask for unicorns but they are so damned hard to find I decided to keep it simple.

  • PrincessOfTheCrystal

    lol, a bunch of sheltered white cry manbabies complaining about a generation that are done with their rubbish, what a surprise.

    • colchar

      You’re a special kind of stupid aren’t you? And yes, that was a rhetorical question.

      • PrincessOfTheCrystal

        sorry, did I interrupt your “safe space”, sheltered man-child who cannot deal with his ever increasing irrelevance?

        • colchar

          Congratulations on proving my point.

          • PrincessOfTheCrystal

            It must be great when you don’t have to make real arguments because you have no actual stake in arguments about abuse or discrimination whatsoever.

          • wh09

            Yes the burden of proof never does seem to fall on the “oppressed”, what bogus statistic is it this time?

          • PrincessOfTheCrystal

            I’m curious why we’re constantly asked to prove things when very often at the exact same time people are engaging in exactly the same sort of abusive behaviour we’re complaining about in the first place?

          • wh09

            Well if the abuse is so plainly evident, you must have extensive evidence to reinforce your claims of oppression and discrimination. As a minority myself, I would like to be made aware of this abuse so I too can act against it.

          • PrincessOfTheCrystal

            I’m trans and autistic. Are you seriously denying I don’t experience a world of abuse??? You just have to google my name to see the crap people have to say – usually people like you may I add.

          • wh09

            What does your identity and experience have to do with the prevalence of abuse in society? Again, if this abuse was as prevalent as you claim it to be, you would have extensive evidence to argue your claim and shut me up, yet you have failed to produce anything. I want to be educated, please show me the evidence beyond your own anecdotal experience.

          • PrincessOfTheCrystal

            Oh my god, just google “transgender bathroom bills” and you’ll find pages and pages of abuse against trans people. Look up autism cures and you’ll find people feeding bleach to their autistic children. Are you really this distant from reality?

          • wh09

            So the bleach thing, I did some research, it’s hardly society wide discrimination, more like a few religious nutters with no sense of reality. I would agree with the sentiment that religion is the source of a lot of discrimination in society today.

            As for the negative abuse on transgender bathroom bills, yes you will probably find abusive comments on many other controversial issues. Hardly evidence of widespread, systemic abuse, you also don’t have to read the comments section. I also question the validity of using internet comments as a barometer of widespread societal abuse.

            I would encourage you to get a little perspective and look outside the West to see real discrimination and oppression, because there’s still plenty that exists today. As a millenial born in the west (I’m assuming) you belong to one of the most privileged class of people that have ever existed, even if you are trans and autistic.

          • PrincessOfTheCrystal

            There is literally nothing I could show you that would convince you otherwise. The problem here is with an empathy failure and an extreme stubbornness and unwillingness to learn and accept the experiences of others. Abuse against autists takes on more forms than just that. In France, they wrap us up in wet blankets because they’re convinced we didn’t get enough womb-love.

            And know I won’t “probably” find, I WILL find. I’ve dealt with abuse all my life. I’ve experienced violence for being trans. But you’re telling me my own issues like you’re an expert on them? The problem is with immense self centredness, usually from white cis het(and apparently one or two asian) men. Even other people’s issues are centred on you, and people need to prove to you that they’re oppressed before they can speak.

            Also, I don’t need to look outside the west to see real discrimination and oppression. I know the rates of murder and suicide in our community. And let’s get real, you’re rubbing shoulders with the people who want to build walls to keep out the people fleeing that “real” persecution. So you don’t get to use them as a card.

            FWIW I actually worked with asylum seekers and still work with the Roma community. So yes I have seen “real” oppression. Trans people are still “really” oppressed. You don’t know what you’re talking about and I shouldn’t have to dig up the entire internet to prove to you that trans people are systemically oppressed. I’m tired from living a live where I constantly have to justify myself to terrible people. I’ve experienced stalking and bullying all my life and you’re telling me it didn’t happen and I need to somehow account for it. No. It’s not my fault you’re so sheltered from reality you can’t see it.

          • wh09

            You haven’t shown me a single fact despite claiming these facts as self evident, please show me a credible study and I will give greater consideration to your claims, LGBTQ issues are at the forefront of society today so it shouldn’t be hard to find these facts. In what way have I tried to prevent you from speaking? This is how civil discourse works, we have differing opinions and we try to find some middle ground. Just because I disagree with you doesn’t mean you don’t have a voice, I just have a higher standard of evidence beyond internet pages and some anecdotal evidence. I’m not telling you anything about your own experiences, I’ve already accepted your experience, but just because you are a victim doesn’t mean you get to brand society as oppressive, just like a rape victim can’t claim there exists a rape culture when the facts suggest otherwise. I don’t think branding a whole group of people for the actions of a few bad people is conducive to creating a civil society and the trans movement is making big strides which is further evidence of how liberal we are compared to 10 years ago. It’s horrible that you suffered abuse, and I would condemn any person who discriminates on any other basis than merit.

            You’ve also inferred from my comments that I am a Trump supporter, nothing could be further from the truth, I am an advocate of open borders and free trade. You’ve also inferred that I am unaware of your issues and experiences, I will never know what it’s like to be trans but I have experience with a sibling who suffers from severe autism and is incapable of using language and self harms.

          • Mr B J Mann

            “The problem here is with an empathy failure” says the autistic trans?!

          • E.I.Cronin

            Just out of interest, what level of autism do you have?

          • dep

            Talk about self centred!!

          • Give our God Immortal Praise

            Anti-religious hate speech.

          • wh09

            God’s got your back, don’t worry about it

          • Give our God Immortal Praise

            What does that even mean, dopey?

          • Mr B J Mann

            Who’s Bathroom Bill?

            And are you sure he isn’t abusing himself?!

          • Give our God Immortal Praise

            Oh no, another wannabe victim. Yawn.

          • johnhenry

            Many well informed and reasonable people (er, me for example) doubt the verifiable existence of this so-called transgender category, except as a fashionable trope or as a symptom of mental illness – perhaps autogynephilia or transvestophilia or some other paraphilic disorder?

            Autism, on the other hand, is a real medical condition, and depending on its severity can be very debilitating, but not always. In fact, one fascinating case comes to mind of a youngster (about 17 years old now) diagnosed with severe autism who studies at the prestigious Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario. There are other similar cases, as you probably know.
            http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/jacob-barnett-boy-genius/
            ___
            p.s. I don’t wish to google your name, but I sympathise with your situation.

          • Mr B J Mann

            How can you understand that you are being abused if you are autistic?

            In fact, how can you know you are trans?!

          • Donafugata

            And I was thinking that you were a character from Game of Thrones.

          • dep

            Perhaps because of all the crap you come out with?
            Put trans and autistic aside and what you are left with is a human being who is just extremely annoying. You do not like criticism so you call it something else.
            Be nice. People will be nice back.

    • Bram

      Dishing out a torrent of abuse and then demanding compassion. Motes and beams, my dear. Please be gone.

  • AWoLsco

    Not long ago, I wrote to Reading District Council suggesting the establishment of an all-white, non-socialist, purely-Christian residential area…. a ‘safe space’ of peace and tranquility for xenophobes, bigots and neo-nazis like myself…..while at the same time, saving the general public from our eternal grouses, gripes and moaning at the parlous state of our now benighted country.
    So far, much to my surprise and chagrin, I have received no reply to this constructive suggestion, to bring peace and harmony to this small corner of our formerly hallowed Isles.

    • Jacobi

      They’re preparing an underground lock-up from which you will never to be heard of again.
      It takes time and must be in-line with safety procedures for workers and bureaucrats so you can yet make your last will and testament.

  • PrincessOfTheCrystal

    The majority of you people are utterly sheltered from discrimination and come from a generation significantly less impoverished than the millenials you whine about(and who’s futures you sold away). You accuse people of having thin skins when the reality is that the reason “safe spaces” exist(and oh boy do you morons abuse this term) is because some of us are subjected to constant nonsense. DESPITE the fact that you’re protected from all this, you still never shut up complaining! It’s millenials this, SJWs that. PC gone too far. Soon we’ll have people complaining they were arrested for trying to beat up a Muslim and then it’ll be OK to criticise the police again.

    • Give our God Immortal Praise

      Come again, in English.

      • SunnyD

        G.O. G.Im.P.

    • Andy JS

      I think you’ll find that by most measures the millennials are the most privileged generation there has even been. Only someone with a warped sense of history — ie. no sense of history — could claim otherwise. When my grandfather was born in 1909 the average life expectancy for a British man was 45. The problem here is similar to the narcissism of small differences. The smaller the problems become, the more people make a fuss about them. When most people didn’t reach the age of 60, they didn’t complain about how unfair life was. Now, when everyone lives better than a member of the royal family a few hundred years ago — ie. every single one of Queen Anne’s children died by the age of 15 (in the early 18th century) — they complain and whinge about how unfair life is.

      From Wikipedia, about Queen Anne, who was by definition the most important person in the country and perhaps the entire world at that time:

      “Anne was plagued by ill health throughout her life. From her thirties onwards, she grew increasingly lame and obese. Despite seventeen pregnancies by her husband, Prince George of Denmark, she died without any surviving children and was the last monarch of the House of Stuart.”

    • Jacobi

      Princess, if I my say so, having read some your comments here, you strike me as quite capable of looking after yourself?

    • KilowattTyler

      Since people who are white, working-class and male are now at the bottom of the heap on any measure you can mention, you will presumably be anxious to highlight the plight of these victims of discrimination.

      • Mary Ann

        What discrimination, anti discrimination legislation is designed to give the rest of us the same privileges enjoyed by white males. As for working class, the opportunities to become middle class have been around for everyone for the last 50 years.

        • KilowattTyler

          Bill Gates, David Cameron, the Pope, Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump are all very powerful and/or very rich. All these people are white and male – ergo all people who are white and male are rich and/or powerful. By the same ‘logic’, all monks are men, therefore all men are monks.
          The Queen is female, therefore oppressed by privileged white males including dustmen, barmen and unemployed coal miners.
          Barack Obama is male but black, therefore is put-upon by white people living in trailer parks.

          As for the middle class, they ensure that their own children get more than their fair share out of the state education system and that therefore the ‘opportunities to become middle class’ are skewed away from working-class children. The middle classes work the system by (i) using their economic muscle to buy homes in the catchment area of ‘good’ schools; (ii) discovering God in time to ensure their childrens’ acceptance in church schools (which are smaller than state schools with more spent per pupil, although funds are provided by the state); (iii) using ‘networking’ (= mutual back-scratching) to cultivate and influence relevant people in authority.
          Despite milking the state system the Guardian level of society is very righteous about public schools – perhaps the *overt* use of economic power to buy good education offends their sense of taste.

        • KilowattTyler

          A couple of things I forgot to mention yesterday:

          1/ “…the opportunities to become middle class have been around for everyone for the last 50 years.”
          What significant event in this regard happened in 1966 or thereabouts? Is this ’50 years’ relevant in any way or simply the use of a number to give the impression of precision (a common debating trick) ?

          2/
          The older public schools, those organisations much derided by the Guardian-reading classes, actually started life as schools for the poor. Eton was founded by Henry II to house and educate orphans, with the aim of sending them to Oxford to train as clergymen. Winchester was founded by William of Wykeham for similar reasons. This is why private schools in this country are called, paradoxically, ‘public’ schools.
          The public schools provided a high standard of education. This meant, of course, that they became targets for the ‘aspirational classes’ as the numbers and influence of these people increased in 19th C Britain, and from about 1840 onwards changed function to become schools for the upper-middle and upper classes (whilst still hanging on to their charitable status!).

          The change in nature of the ‘public’ schools is an early example of the corruption of education to serve the interests of elites.

    • E.I.Cronin

      That’s a massive and quite arrogant assumption. You have no idea what the people here have suffered and endured in their lives. And they don’t go around wearing their tribulations like a badge or suit of armour either.

      • Mary Ann

        If you think people here suffer, try living in a third world village or a refugee camp for a few weeks, and remember how lucky you are to have been born in one of the richest countries in the world

        • E.I.Cronin

          Mary Ann – suffering isn’t a competition.

          And you don’t have to turn everything into a white-loathing racial trip, so drop the threadbare guilt tactics. ‘Princess’ has no idea what readers here have experienced. You think you need to be African or Asian to suffer? Cancer, death of children, depression, rape, psychological abuse, domestic violence, financial ruin, mental illness to name a few are part of the human condition and cut across all categories.

          Of course we don’t know what 3rd world poverty is like. We are incredibly lucky. But our nations give extraordinary amounts in foreign aid, medical support, infrastructure programmes and environmental initiatives. Much of that foreign aid is wasted by corrupt third world governments who don’t have the social capital and institutions that Anglo Saxon nations built up through the centuries.

          • Milano Merano

            I’m sure the thousands of mass raped girls in Rotherham and other British town, are still suffering PTSD 20 years later.
            But they don’t matter cause they’re white, ey, Mary Ann, and the for they don’t deserve your concern.

          • E.I.Cronin

            Spot on Milano. There’s a particularly enraged Pat Condell video about progressive ‘feminists’ who’ve refused to acknowledge the abuse of white girls and boys in the UK and across Northern Europe.

        • E.I.Cronin

          ps Refugee and Migration junkies take note: the 93 billion euros that Merkel has squandered on the refugee ‘crisis’ that she engineered could have relieved global poverty on an extraordinary scale.

          4 billion people live on less than $2 US a day. 93 Billion could have doubled the annual income of 132,857,143 human beings. Many of these people cannot afford a good meal. That’s 133 MILLION people Merkel could have saved from starvation.

          60% of the 1.1 economic migrants flooding Europe do not qualify as refugees and could afford people smuggler fees, smartphones and reasonable clothes.

        • Milano Merano

          Why do they live in poverty and squalor? They not only get billions upon billions from the west, for doing nothing, but their brothers sit on the oil-richest countries on the planet and spend billions on palaces and gold plated toilets.
          Oh wait a minute….I apologise. I forgot that Muslims don’t help their own; they kill their own. Nevermind.

  • Give our God Immortal Praise

    Without God our children our lost, thus they’re now degrading themselves with gayism, trans-stuff, dr*gs, p*rn, obesity, self-abuse and atheism. Hence the fact they’re so mentally confused, so isolated and pathetic. Sad and tragic, sure, but we can put them down as a mistake and start again. Basically, that means only the Holy Father can save us.

    • SunnyD

      religious piffle. things were soooo much better in the Victorian age I suppose? even if they don’t believe in God, doesn’t mean he/she/it has deserted them (if god really exists). get a new shade of glasses before you end up slitting your wrists with the despair of it all

      • Give our God Immortal Praise

        Nutter.

        • SunnyD

          G.O G.Im.P

    • Bonkim

      God – who is he, she or it?

    • josh whitehead

      no god can’t save us just like how he never saved the
      6 million jews and other minorities in german occupied countries (or the other 5 million who were imprisioned under the final solution but never killed)
      The millions who have died of cancer
      The thousands who died in 9/11 and resorted to jumping probably almost 100 storeys

      • Donafugata

        You’re right about one thing, at least.

    • Mary Ann

      So your belief in your god isn’t strong enough to cope with atheists, you can’t stand having your beliefs challenged.

      • Give our God Immortal Praise

        Mental.

    • Lawrence James.

      Don’t worry: the self-abusers will soon go blind, or so your lot were forever saying.

  • Jacobi

    The real problem nowadays is that anyone who could conceivably be held to account for even the slightest misfortune is simply engaged, whether they realise it or not, in posterior covering. The driving force behind that is the “no win no fee” legal brigade who ought to be squashed..

    The end-result of this trend is to make society and the young in particular more vulnerable and more at risk to that tiny minority who are always there ready to exploit.

    This is being seized on by the various “Luvvie” lots. But, people are not daft and are beginning to kick out against this mess.

  • Chris Bartelt

    How on earth are ‘generation pansy’ going to defend themselves against the sweeping hordes of Islamaniacs?

    Game over. We are doomed.

    • captainslugwash

      Maybe not. Cometh the hour…….
      The question is how bad do things need to get before there is an awakening?

      • Bonkim

        Cometh the hour the weak will be trodden over by those that put their feet in first.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Ah, that excuse for violence.

          • Bonkim

            Nature is harsh and violent – no one gets any favours.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Your Islamaniacs are? Yea, probably.

  • Hippograd

    If one took the name off an article written by a member of the Revolutionary Communist Party (deceased), would it ever be possible to guess who the author was? The same slogans, the same phrases, the same lock-step libertarianism, as dictated by Dr Frank N. Furter.

  • Bonkim

    British society has got soft and lost its ability to adapt and change. Risk averse and the youngsters are afraid to experiment and learn from experience. too politically correct and afraid to comment or criticize. All signs of an affluent and lazy generation. Forgetting that only the fit will survive – with the rest of the world overpopulated others will try anything to get what they want and the British will be run over. What a sad turn about for earlier generations that put the great in Britain.

    • josh whitehead

      first of all the earlier generations killed millions with colonisation okay so stop with the patriotic bs.First of all The young people don’t run britain 40-60yr old men do and where does this illusion of us being afraid to comment?

      • Bonkim

        Utter rubbish – have you lived in the Empire? The concept of the nation-state only developed in late 19th and early 20th centuries – prior to that it was the age of colonization and Empires across the globe.

        Also see how people have been exploited across the globe by their own folk – the world was a rough place until recent decades and you got clobbered if you don’t strike the first blow. Nature is harsh and those in affluent societies have come to think that they and all around them are civilized and that mankind and you can have milk and honey for the asking. We live in an age of political correctness that is emasculating youth.

        We have given the wrong impression to all these refugees marching across Europe invited by the naive Frau Merkel. It is a dog eat dog world out there and the present generation has forgotten how it was in earlier decades/centuries.

        You may not be afraid to comment but are you prepared to lay down your life for Britain – that is the question. Britain’s enemies are prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice – and those wo went to wars in earlier centuries were prepared too.

        • josh whitehead

          Are you really attacking those who let refugees take refuge in their countries well i guess people who supported the refugees? Those people are in the grips of a war which wouldn’t exist if western countries hadn’t invaded oh and not to mention how so many western countries pretend to give so much in aid but buy natural resources at undervalued prices and buy goods which are sold at a price where the farmer suffers (i.e. coffee is not sold fairly because consumers want low prices and the companies they buy from want bigger profit margins)

          • Bonkim

            It is an uneven world – much of the wars and violence is and has been there for centuries – have you ever heard of any period in the history of Arabia or Persia or Afghanistan and India where different tribes, and religions/sects were not letting blood – of course the colonial powers took advantage and played one against the other for profit. everybody did. So going back to Iraq or Syria – the Sunni/Shia blood-letting has been going on ever since Muhammad preached his ignorant sermons and killed off any that did not listen.

            Western powers interfered whenever such goings on upset their commercial interests – who won’t? See whether the Chinese, Indians or the Japanese will not intervene when their interests are at stake.

            Don’t start blaming the west for your own backward cultures and deficiencies.

          • Milano Merano

            Muslims are just better at killing their own, than helping their own. And since they help absolutely nobody, why should we? We only get Rotherham and 7/7 as a thank you back.
            I say deport them back to one of their 50+ cesspits, built giant walls around them, and let them get on with it.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Ah, the PC bigotry…the desire to purge those not like you.. and who’s next? I mean except Jews.

          • dep

            It is now accepted that 70% of these so called refugees are not refugees at all.
            Do some reading.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            No, your rejection of most people fleeing those like you…

        • josh whitehead

          Oh and britain occupied countries it had no business in an example would be ireland who had rebelled in 1798 (if not before then) and continued to fight until 1921 when britain still wanted ports belonging to ireland and demanded they pay “land annuities” which ended up being 10 million pounds,it was their land from the start so why did they have to buy it back?

          • Bonkim

            Utter rubbish. Read up on history – all through history societies that were inventive, industrious, and better organized dominated others that were culturally and emotionally backward, believed in superstitions and ignorant belief systems.

            Following the Romans who dominated 2 Millennia ago, the Mongols and Arabs had the organization, technology and zeal to dominate which they did until Europe became inventive, better organized and threw back the mantle of blind religion and superstition, asked awkward questions and were adventurous enough to sail on the high seas discovering new lands and learning ne techniques. That is how civilisation progresses, old ones are destroyed.

            Technological man has dominated over the last century, bringing new ways to organize, manufacture and think ahead whilst the backward and superstitious lot were left behind. Over the past three centuries people in Africa, Asia, and the Americas were unable or unwilling to resist superior organization and technology from the West but are now catching up and may dominate again – these things go in cycles as the world does not stand still. As the American Indians used to say – Pale-face medicine is more powerful than their witch-doctor’s.

            Going back to the 1800s nation states as we know today did not exist, and most gave in to superior organisation and technology. In return societies that were backward a hundred or two hundred years ago learnt new ways to organize, make new things, and sell their own goods to the world market. Railways, telegraph and other ways to communicate and to travel, etc, etc, Colonialism was a two way process, the colonies allowed many of today’s developments to start in a low risk environment.

            Regarding blood and violence – wars and violence do not build anything and the British colonial government appreciated that – it was more a collaboration and cooperation between the various people of the Empire and of course those that managed the Empire were given due respect – all societies across the globe were deferential to race, birth, religion and any number of other distinguishing features.

            You should travel around and find out for yourselves how people are exploited by their own kind before waffling about Empire and colonial governments and blood-lust.

          • Bonkim

            Was Ireland a country in 1798? You should learn a little about land tenure and how a few dominated the peasantry in the 17 and 1800s and in previous centuries – not just in Ireland but across the globe.

            Land tenure across the globe at the time was in the hands of the few and those that had gun boats used them to advantage. The Irish of the time were mainly backward peasants and did subsistence farming or tenants of the landed gentry. Different times and as you say the Irish managed to make the English pay and managed to gain independence – good for them – that is how history evolves.

            No rights or wrongs in history and judging history by today’s politically correct standards is bonkers.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Ah, that excuse for your ancestors.

          • Bonkim

            Judging history by today’s misguided notions is bonkers.

        • josh whitehead

          your ‘great britain’ was built on other countries blood,At the very least accept that

          • Donafugata

            That’s exactly the kind of thinkng that has brought you to the unpleasant space you are in today.
            You don’t seem to realise that this kind of thinking simply perpetuates the circumstances which you are unhappy about today.

            Good luck, Josh.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Really, your desire to make it unpleasant…

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Same old right wing whine there.

      Kids are afraid to fail because the government punishments for failing as so bad.
      As you spout off social darwinism, and as you hark back to your dear Empire…

      • Bonkim

        The weak are eliminated one way or the other. Darwinism rules nature.

  • The sad thing is – which these foolish young people do not see – is they are totally unprepared for making a success of their lives in the difficult environment we now face. Because they have been pampered all their lives, they imagine they will secure jobs, a house, a relationship, a career, a pension, a successful retirement …. I’m afraid, that’s almost certainly not going to happen to them. Evolve or die – I think they’re going to die.

    • josh whitehead

      Nope everyone has a false illusion of the world before they go out and face it
      i guess maybe our generation is a bit more vocal about due to the availability of the internet

      • Bonkim

        It does not take much bravery to sit in front of your screen and zombie-like cut and paste comments on the screen. the real test would be if you are capable to confront those that you don’t like eye ball to eye ball.

        • josh whitehead

          Okay then, Of course I’d be a little comprehensive because the world is so bug and there is so many people with good and bad intentions but I could do it. If I could I’d definetly talk to a lot of politicians about some of the laws they are trying to implement and what they’re doing as a whole which is not really sorting out the situation at hand

          • Bonkim

            Use the political system that is there, join a political party, write letters to the press. Good luck.

    • gunnerbear

      “…they imagine they will secure jobs, a house, a relationship, a career, a pension, a successful retirement….” Yep…the Boomers have f**ked that system right up…. 🙂

      • Son_of_Casandra

        The system remains as it always was. Get a job, work hard, save and don’t waste your money and all of the above is feasible. Just need to get immigration down to a sensible manageable level around what it was in the middle of the 20th century and not the hyperinflated flood that we have at the moment.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Ah yes, just gotta blame the other and stop the workers having jobs, right.
          And don’t eat, don’t need anything and you might one day have a house deposit.

          • Son_of_Casandra

            My kids who are both in their 20’s did it. Those who whinge that it;s so hard just need to stop blaming others, get off their backsides and work at it….the way others do.

      • Carol Thorne

        But we did not imagine it would all fall into our laps, immediately, with no effort to speak of on our part, either ! Neither, on the whole, did we produce children before we had saved, worked, and very often lived for a fair while in conditions today’s fragile little flowers would not contemplate, while we saved for something better, or to put in the inside toilet, or even a bathroom !!! and heating other than a single coal fire, even maybe one or two fitted cupboards in the kitchen ! Then we had the children, when we had the home and the means to provide for them. We did not expect the state to keep them, either, there was no family allowance for the first child, a tiny amount for the second.
        The career was worked for, only a small proportion of us went to university, and we paid for our pensions !

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Ah yes, the “young R lazy”, the evils of education and the hate on the pensions…but only for those not retired.

          As you ignore the average age people have kids at, and try and paint deprivation as noble. Child poverty, even, as noble.

          • Carol Thorne

            That is entirely your interpretation of what I said, and rather confirms the attitude that I complained of.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Boomers? Tip – Torynomics.

    • evad666

      It will make it so much easier to kill them when the Islamists take over.

      • Muslims won’t be taking over. Remove the PC elite and all Muslim ‘power’ evaporates.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Funny, you’re espousing views like those of the Islamists there in your anti-democratic views.

      • Kev Purves

        Now if that wasn’t so near the truth it would be really funny

      • Leon Wolfeson

        More of your plan…sigh.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Look, because you want it to be difficult… as you oppose them… want them dead even.

  • AlexanderGalt

    We are not responsible, the left is. All those wonderful developments above were/are championed by the left. We freedom and responsibility people on the right have brought up our children to be resilient and independent. Sadly our children have to put up with all the stress-free upbringing cry-babies brought up by leftie parents! http://john-moloney.blogspot.com/2015/10/sanity-at-last.html

    • josh whitehead

      Don’t try and blame others for your problems, god this bullshit.This is the bullshit I have to put up with from literally all older generations.Honestly it just gets annoying.

      • newminster

        English your first language, josh?

        • FrankS2

          Waycist!!

    • Mary Ann

      That doesn’t add up, the left is far less left than it was in the past.

      • Vieuxceps2

        No,the hard core of leftidom is ever leftier as their risible doctrines fail and fail again. Lost elections? We weren’tleft-wing enough. Idiots.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Never mind the facts.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Ah, PC blaming, right.

      When plenty of the right are authoritarian and stateist.
      And kids are not bullied? OHNOES.

      • AlexanderGalt

        If you are statist you are not conservative. We believe in small government, individual freedom and personal responsibility. We are not trying to create a utopia. We quite like the rough and tumble of life.

  • MrToad76

    As the generation in question is the first to be fully reared with computers and the internet, they are encouraged to be far more emotive (or whimpering). Their dependence on the internet leads to posts of fake-outrage, fake-anxiety etc. In the end it gives them the deluded sense of fake authority.

  • josh whitehead

    You want to know why our generation seems to whine about problems yours has supposedly conquered, Like racism,wars,lack of equality
    Because you haven’t, you only made steps towards that while simultaneously destroying numerous economies and plunging the world into an almost international recession

    • Son_of_Casandra

      Absolute unmitigated tosh and drivel. Global wealth and the number of people living in primitive conditions is at it’s lowest level ever, in spite of many of the citizens of the third world preferring to destroy everything around them, instead of acting like civilised human beings.

  • gunnerbear

    It’s just students being tools – they’ll grow up, get jobs as merchant bankers….and the ladies will become the wives of merchant bankers living a soulless existence in an expensive part of the Home Counties wondering why they threw away an elite career as the call of the gin bottle gets more frantic at around 11:30 in the morning….

    • grimm

      The ladies you describe belong in the 1960’s. These days women are likely to throw away an elite career to become aromatherapists, pychotherapists, environmental activists, lifestyle consultants etc.

      • evad666

        Thought they were all becoming Corbyn supporters?

      • Maureen Fisher

        They sure won’t be doing any manual labour.

    • sebastian2

      As late as that??

      • gunnerbear

        Top Notch…….. 🙂

  • grimm

    I think the blame should be placed squarely where it belongs – with middle class women of the do-gooder variety. The increase of female power and influence has led to the growth in our public life of all those favourite female obsessions – health, safety, diet, comfort, fashion, emotional wellbeing, self-esteem and self-image (a concern with appearance and personality over character).

    You can add environmentalism and ecology to that list as the myth of benevolent and bountiful Mother Nature raped by industrial and mechanistic MANkind lies at the emotional heart of the “save the planet” movement.

    As women become even more influential (this is what they demand) the growth of the caring, compassionate, non-hurtful intellectual strata of society will increase. The trouble is they won’t be able to defend themselves or the rest of us against the spread of violent criminality. They don’t have the fighting spirit needed or the hard and realistic view of human nature.

    • Mary Ann

      Oh dear, I suppose you want us back in the doll’s house, well hard luck, it isn’t going to happen.

      • sebastian2

        With respect, I do not think that was what was meant. Leaving that aside though, I think at least part of our contemporary problem is that men have forgotten how to behave in a manly but honourable and decent, self-disciplined and admirable manner. Overpaid and overindulged footballers, for instance, often set a deplorable example. Pampered celebrities similarly so.

        But as I said, that is only part of it. The female aspect may, in its own way, be as culpable. You may expand my line of thinking with your own instances I’m sure.

      • Vieuxceps2

        Doll’s house not necessary. Just try to think more and avoid the tired feminist cliches,eh?

      • Ridcully

        Wait until the Sharia boys take over.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Yea, what will you do then?

          • Snipkokken Balsov

            What will you do then? Usually, leftists are the first ones invited to dance the Tyburn jig.

      • farkennel

        Is that what you “suppose”?Perhaps you shouldn`t jump to conclusions,it`s tantamount to racism and sexism.

    • sebastian2

      Even at risk of offending those ladies who do not fit in here (there are many actually), you have an excellent point. Anecdotal, of course, but I have seen middle-class liberal women (teachers are particularly prone to this) wringing their hands and sentiments in despair at pupils’ bad behaviour as “counselling” and earnestly explaining the rules and protocols just does not work. They get themselves sniggered at.

      What’s required is something more rigorous, uncompromising, straightforward, clear-cut and ……. manly.

      We have allowed ourselves to become feminised by women who are, themselves, often hardly feminine. My private view is that women deserve all the respect, opportunities and fair play society can offer. I reject discrimination. But I do not regard men and women as “the same”. They are not. There should be parity of esteem for the differences as well.

      • Donafugata

        Well said, Sebastian.

        Equal but different.

        • sebastian2

          🙂

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        • Leon Wolfeson

          Like Jim Crow.

        • Kavod And Kaved

          Like whites and blacks in the 50s?

    • Maureen Fisher

      The boys are just as pansified. The backlash to this is the macho drinking culture of the frat house variety on campus.

      • TatR

        It’s true that nothing good can come of it. The unbearable unpleasantness of the ultra-left social justice activists provokes the unbearable unpleasantness of the new alt-right super trolls like Milo Yiannopolous. So now there’s two unbearable youth movements. Hopefully both sides can get it out of their system before they ruin everything.

        • Maureen Fisher

          Agreed.

        • dep

          I Very much like Milo.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          That excuse for Comrade Milo? Oh dear.

      • sarahsmith232

        pansified! Ha! think I’ve just come across a favourite new word. Tee Hee

    • Leon Wolfeson

      So you blame women not being poor…sigh.
      Say women can’t take care of themselves… sigh.

  • John

    Excellent piece. A copy of this should be posted up in every classroom in the land.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Yea,gotta waste paper to advertise trash?

  • John

    I used to take the mickey out of my dad when he would say “What’s needed is another war”. I think I have an idea what he might have been getting at.
    Peace and Love.

  • CeciBon

    And this generation has to face the increasing violence of the isis, al qaeda kind…which is merciless. With this generation WWII would not had been won by the allies…

    • Lee Thrace

      World war 2 wouldn’t have been won by the cowardly baby boomers who cried their way to defeat in vietnam either. You’re just a pathetic old man hanging onto his parent’s legacy. Pathetic.

      • CeciBon

        who is the old man?

        • Lee Thrace

          There’s an easy way to answer that question you brain-dead mouth-breather, who is the one pretending to know about the difficulties faced during world war II?

          • TatR

            Great debate guys! Really raised the tone.

          • Kavod And Kaved

            Well, these ARE the generations who preceded and created Generation Snowflake…why are you surprised that at the first sign of dissenting opinion they scream at each other and pull each other’s hair. If Gen Snowflake are the babies, these are the toddlers,

    • farkennel

      I think the Soviets might have something to say about that.I know they were allies but you make it sound like the British and the Americans did more than break a nail.

  • plainsdrifter

    Spot on. Mewling, puking cry-babies. Reared by mewling, puking cry-babies.

    If it weren’t for nuclear weapons, we would be ripe for conquest along with much else of western, capitalist democracies.

  • Basiclife1

    I’ve been saying the same for a decade. I’m amazed that the children of colleagues are still driven to school at the age of 13. By that time, I was catching 2 trains and a bus each way.

    It’s no wonder that children as so incapable of dealing with … anything.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Rich kids experience…is not average.

  • TatR

    Student politics were always terrible and annoying. It’s just we hear about it more because of the internet. Back in the 80s and so on it was contained to campuses and out in the real world it was largely ignored.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      It still is largely ignored except when someone in the press has athens-pot-shard complaints about the yoof of today.

  • Maureen Fisher

    1944 – kids of 18,19 fighting the enemy on the beaches,trenches and in the air. Girls of the same age doing the hard labouring and factory jobs back home. 2016 – whiny little cry babies aged 18, 19, demanding safe spaces preferably in a play pen with a cuddly toy and a blanket.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Tell me, why would they need to be protected physically from you?
      As you decry those who fought your side back then, right.

  • Maureen Fisher

    Quote from Salman Rushdie – “we, the public, are easily, lethally offended. We have come to think of taking offence as a fundamental right. We value very little more highly than our rage, which gives us, in our opinion, the moral high ground. From this high ground we can shoot down our enemies and inflict heavy fatalities. We take pride in our short fuses. Our anger elevates, transcends.”. Brilliant!

  • Leon Wolfeson

    More athens-pot-shard whining about the young? Really?

  • Jan Scott

    This post is missing two key variables: daycare and single mothers. It is established that daycare creates aggressive children that seek an authority to solve their problems. Children deprived of a father figure miss out on the rough and tumble of aggressive play and the ability to roll with the punches, be they verbal or physical. Men tend to let children make mistakes and learn from them. Women tend to shelter children from mistakes and instead let them win all the time. It is more often a father that kicks a kid out of the nest. To make matters worse children are encouraged to be confused about everything including their gender. They are told there are seven or more genders and that they can shape shift from one to another. Face it, the do-Gooder school marms have scarred a generation and they will pay a terrible price for all the ‘help’ and ‘self esteem’ foisted upon them.

    How, I wonder, will these misfit-toy children raise their own children?

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