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Books

T.S. Eliot’s crisis year: exhaustion, hair loss and a wrecked marriage

Eliot’s extensive American tour in 1932–33 came close to being sabotaged when his wife locked up his lecture notes on the eve of his departure

12 March 2016

9:00 AM

12 March 2016

9:00 AM

The Letters of T.S. Eliot, Volume 6, 1932–1933 T.S. Eliot, edited by Valerie Eliot and John Haffenden

Faber, pp.896, £50, ISBN: 9780571316342

F.R. Leavis once denounced the Twickenham edition of Pope’s Dunciad for producing a meagre trickle of text through a desert of apparatus, the trickle sometimes disappearing altogether. In this volume of T. S. Eliot’s letters, from 1932–1933, the footnotes, the infantry and the grunts, are the stars — shooting stars, flares with flair, illuminating apparently unpromising basic materials.

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