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Books

Is China Miéville becoming a bit too inscrutable?

This Census-Taker, Miéville’s new apocalyptic novel, is (apparently) incomplete, definitely downbeat and signifies — who knows?

12 March 2016

9:00 AM

12 March 2016

9:00 AM

This Census-Taker China Miéville

Picador, pp.160, £12.99, ISBN: 9781509812141

China Miéville’s work is invariably clever, inevitably dense and usually interwoven with hard-left political and social concerns, but its author rarely loses sight of the delightfully mind-warping possibilities of his chosen genres. Last year’s story collection, Three Moments of an Explosion, offered brief slices of imaginary futures in which icebergs floated above London streets, archaeologists hauled crystal statues from the Mediterranean earth and urban hipsters attended parties wearing the heads of butchered animals.

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