Rod Liddle

Class War are fatuous idiots, but at least they hate some of the right people

It must be said that none of those who attended the Cereal Killer Café protest appeared to be horny-handed sons of toil

3 October 2015

9:00 AM

3 October 2015

9:00 AM

I was unable to join the violent protests held by Class War at the Cereal Killer Café in London last week because I had to stay at home to supervise our gardener. Yes — I know what you’re about to say. It is indeed ridiculous that one should have to stand over workmen to ensure that they are doing a decent job. But there is a patch of lawn towards the rear of our grounds which the blighters always skimp on, believing that it is too far from the house for us to notice. So I stand down there, with a cheerfully expectant expression, as the surly little man goes about his labours.

The Class War march was not terribly well attended, despite the publicity it received. Perhaps many others who would have turned up were having similar problems with their own servants — here a recalcitrant and infanticidally inclined nanny, there an indolent and kleptomaniac char-woman. None of those interviewed themselves seemed to be horny-handed sons of toil. There was Adam Clifford, a performance artist, yoga teacher and poet whose most recent work is entitled ‘Android Death Queer’: please — hurry, hurry, while stocks last. And Simon Elmer (not present at the march, but a supporter: probably at home nanny-watching, I would guess), who is a former professor of that most resolutely blue-collar of disciplines, art history. And Class War’s current star, the henna-haired perpetual student Lisa McKenzie, who is currently a ‘research fellow’ at the London School of Economics, having been in one or another useless branch of academia for the past 15 years, paid for by the impoverished taxpayer.

You could tell these furious monkeys were not working-class because of their Stalinist adherence to any and every manifestation of fatuous identity politics, especially fatuous gender-based identity politics. Their next protest, for example, is against the Jack the Ripper museum in London, on the grounds that it glorifies violence against women — which is a bit like saying that Auschwitz glorifies anti-Semitism. Most working-class people find identity politics an anathema, perhaps because they have imbibed insufficient quantities of Marcuse and Gramsci and Habermas and are therefore not, in a Marxist sense, fully conscious. They are still asleep, these legions of the lumpenproletariat, unenlightened and averse. That, I suspect, would be Class War’s analysis. It is perhaps one reason why Lisa McKenzie received a grand total of 53 votes at the last general election, and Adam Clifford 59. The real working class think these people are very stupid and irrelevant — merely another manifestation of the asinine politically correct liberal elite that predates upon them.


All of which is a bit of a shame, because some of Class War’s messages have no little force and relevance. It is true that, as they argue, gentrification — via high rents and property prices — is forcing ordinary Londoners out of their homes and that previously blue-collar areas of the city are being turned into mimsy ghettoes stocked with smug and affluent ‘hipsters’, as they put it. And serviced by shops which make you gag as soon as you see them. There is something vaguely repellent about a café selling cornflakes at four quid a bowl, as Cereal Killer does. Repellent particularly because people are dense enough and rich enough to go there and fork out their money, but also because those banished to the margins of London often genuinely are broke and would look upon such an institution with both awe and disgust. Niche marketing for tossers, I would suggest. I also rather like Class War’s cry to arms of ‘Fuck London!’, as I cannot abide the place for many of the reasons the organisation itself identifies, and besides which I enjoy swearing. Class War loathes — with a commendable vigour — the capital’s middle-class liberal elite. I mean, it really, really hates them, perhaps even more than the Tories (who it also hates, of course). Good, good — me too.

But Class War doesn’t get that the happy-clappy multicultural ethos of middle-class London is another factor which has driven the working class away. It is undoubtedly wonderful to have world food festivals on your doorstep and pop-up restaurants serving Ethiopian tapas or Bengali sushi — but the middle classes don’t have to live with the day-to-day reality of this multiculturalism: in the schools, in the streets, living right next door. The working classes don’t get the cheap nannies and plumbers and taxis and cleaners; they can’t afford that stuff, anyway. They just lose their jobs as a consequence or see their incomes halved by a secondary labour force which is there for the sole benefit of the affluent. And they get the muzzein’s wail and the street harassment and the crime and the annihilation of their culture as a sort of bonus.

Class War has no answer to this. Bring it up with them and you’ll get called a racist with just as much absolutist venom as you would by a well-heeled Corbynista in Muswell Hell, demanding the country take ever larger amounts of immigration to perpetuate the problem, all in the name of magnanimity and internationalism, when it is really just economic self-interest. In a sense, then, Class War is simply the provisional wing of the liberal elite; self-hating and deluded. Sort of Emily Thornberry MP, with added spray paint.

Nor am I certain that a small café selling cornflakes is the place where the revolution should begin, if it is to begin at all. How about Redcar instead, where the closure of the local steelworks has cost the area — a very poor area — 1,700 jobs? Heard anything from Class War about Redcar? Corbyn, meanwhile, made a genuflection in the direction of Teesside, a week late, as if he had just heard of the place. Pretend lefties, all of them.

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Show comments
  • Sean L

    It’s not gentrification that’s pricing native Londoners out of house and home, nowhere more so than in the environs of Brick Lane – Cockneys have already been ethnically cleansed – but subsidised housing for immigrants. ‘Lumpenproletariat’ means petty criminals, drug addicts, whores, pimps and the like. Outcasts serving no productive purpose and as such immune to revolutionary class consciousness. Between Commercial Street and Brick Lane used to be full of them.

    • red2black

      ‘petty criminals, drug addicts, whores, pimps and the like.’
      Common to all social classes.

    • The_Missing_Think

      In England, race trumps class.

      ie… the non-white, non-European is theoretically, at least equal to the midde classes, by default, by law.

      The police are just inches away, ready to enforce racial equality, if the victim request it.

      They don’t do class equality enforcement. Only racial.

  • blandings

    “all in the name of magnanimity and internationalism, when it is really just economic self-interest.”

    Correct, but you try telling ’em that – they get ever so offended (which I have to admit, I rather enjoy)

    • IainRMuir

      “they get ever so offended”

      Doesn’t take much though, does it?

  • ViolinSonaten b minor.

    What is it about the British and ‘ class’. No human is superior to another because of advantages of
    birth, luck or money.
    I remember when Tony Blair announced ‘ we’re all middle class now’ as he loathed his own party.
    I remember Gordon Brown before the 2010 election asking a lady if she were working class, she
    replied rather sadly that she wasn’t as she’d never worked nor did anyone in her family.
    Probably as you say Rod, a result of multiculturalism, for the majority of immigrants hardly go after
    middle class jobs or live in leafy Tory areas. And yet its Labour that hypocritically rattle away with
    their little class wars. Corbyn himself is hardly working class, even if he wishes to reintroduce mining
    and whippet ownership.

    • red2black

      People invoke class differences when it suits their purposes. Of course, the New Labour idea of trying to make everyone middle class via a credit card bonanaza was a big mistake.

  • ViolinSonaten b minor.

    Rod, there is nothing wrong with multicultural food. Who’d chose pie and mash with that horrible
    green fishy sauce ( my grandmother lived in London for a while) over a nice Persian curry, eh ?
    I’m just defending food alone, not the London Borough of Mecca, a return to just importing food and
    spices from the East is fine with me.

  • The Meister

    “Class War is simply the provisional wing of the liberal elite” Superb.

    • ViolinSonaten b minor.

      And that very same group of spoilt metropolitan liberal elite youth that are in awe of Corbyn,are going to be very disappointed with the harsh and brutal reincarnated
      realities of Corbyn’s era. They think its new but its apparently very stale indeed.

  • right1_left1

    I nearly commented without reading ALL of the article lol

    There is no doubt in my mind that working the class sector has been on the wrong end of misguided policies over the last 40 years.

    Privatisation
    £10 hospital parking charges
    Preposterous traffic management with fines used as sources of revenue.
    Financial skullduggery requiring increases in nominal state debt and collapse of pension/saving returns
    Changes to neighborhoods from which many cant escape
    Zero hour job contracts.
    Collapse of manufacture etc etc

    Some of the above impact everyone but have greater effect on the poorer sector of society..

    It surprises me that the masses have been so passive in light of the changes inflicted on them.
    I’m not convinced such passivity will last for ever

  • red2black

    Nice of the author to mention somewhere outside London for a change. There are a small number of Class War adherents outside London as well, who at least appear to be, and sound, working class. Things like Marxism and the Labour Party really don’t seem to hold any interest for them.

  • justejudexultionis

    Brilliant comment about Corbyn not giving a damn about Redcar. However, don’t think for one moment that the hypocrisy of the left excuses that of the right. Cameron, Osborne et al. are no patriots and are more interested in the share portfolios of their super rich friends and donors than in the indigenous people of this country.

  • Liberanos

    Who are the working class?

    • red2black

      People who aren’t middle or upper class.

  • florencefosterjenkins

    Class War would probably just target Saltburn instead of Redcar, Rod, as it’s a bit ‘gentrified’ (which was obviously the intention of building it in the first place, but that would be lost on them). They’d run a mile from actual working-class people.

    • rodliddle

      wasn’t terribly gentrified when I was there at easter, although there are some divine restaurants, I spose.

      • florencefosterjenkins

        Well I did say ‘a bit!’ Not changed that much since my days there in the 70’s/80’s, which is no bad thing. And yes, some cracking food.

      • red2black

        Why were the comments before davidofkent’s deleted?

        • rodliddle

          Ich Weiss nicht. Keine ahnung. I don’t run the show, R2B.

          • ViolinSonaten b minor.

            Rod OT but would you be terribly offended if I said you looked strikingly
            similar to the picture of Boris Johnson that was on the bright new Speccie webpage this morning. I thought it was you 😉

          • rodliddle

            yep. Too bleedin right I would.

          • Quite right. He looks like 10 pounds of sausage in a 7-pound bag, with a wig bought somewhere in Indochina and dyed by Clairol on its way back to Londonistan.

            You do have your female fans, Rod. Even if I’m a dog : )

          • blandings

            But, those eyes

          • Only before they turn brown. All puppies’ do.

          • ViolinSonaten b minor.

            You’ve described Boris to a tee- how could I have got him and Rod mixed up 😉
            btw noticed you were a sweet looking dog – but now it seems a dress. Although a bit
            short at the knee for me -dressed normally are Indian or Ethnic of some kind and trail
            around the ankle, usually tripping over them or catching them with shoes.

          • Why, thank you, VS! I wish I could shop wherever you’re shopping (unless you sew — a skill I would love to have but alas I only have the unused sewing machine). My wardrobe at the moment is uninspiring. Short skirts, mainly, paired with t-shirts with longer or shorter sleeves, with or without buttons down the front, with hardly any patterns or anything to interest the eye. I’m trying to find a retailer that will fix the situation but nothing under a few hundred bucks per piece really seems my style. If I don’t find some nice clothes soonish, I might decide to tackle DIY with that sewing machine….

          • blandings

            Careful.
            You can push a guy too far.

          • red2black

            Thanks for replying. I saw the earliest comments, and they seemed to claim that the Class War people in Shoreditch were for the most part, working class. This also seemed to be true of the Class War contingent I saw (and heard) at Doncaster Racecourse last year, outside the UKIP Annual Conference.

          • Mr B J Mann

            Middle class drama school graduates and t more self aware trustafarians!

          • red2black

            I’m not sure who you’re being kinder to.

          • rodliddle

            Ok. I wasn’t at the march; I simply read the comments from those who were, and checked out what they did for a living. It’s certainly true that Class War was once solidly working class. Just that it doesn’t seem to be now…………

          • vieuxceps2

            Rod, if you need to show off your knowledge, watch the capitals. “Ich weiss nicht. Keine Ahnung.” or maybe stick to “Dunno. No idea”

          • rodliddle

            Pimmelkopf.

          • blandings

            “Pimmelkopf.”

            Hmm. Williehead.
            So this how we avoid the censor.
            My father was a prisoner of the Germans in WW2
            He figured out why Germans were so uptight: They just couldn’t swear properly – so they shot you instead.

          • vieuxceps2

            Arschloch

          • rodliddle

            Christ, took your time.

          • vieuxceps2

            Ich hatte ‘was Anderes zu tun. Vielen Dank fuer die Antwort,freue mich darauf, Deine weitere Politischegesellschaftlichenmeinungen zu lesen.Viel Glueck.

          • rodliddle

            Lug mich nicht an, Frenchie boy. Sie waren an die Wortebuch. Verzweifelt.

          • vieuxceps2

            Das Luegen ist mir fremd.Die Wahrheit genuegt. Die Wortebuch?Das Woerterbuch waere besser, mein’ich. Mensch, wenn Du Unsinn schreibst,bleib mal bei Englisch,denn Du bist dazu begabt.Beim Deutschschreiben kommst Du hoechst kindisch vor…..

  • davidofkent

    ‘Class War’ are no different from the regular Leftie ‘Rent-a-Mob’ who love to cause distress to ordinary people.

    BTW, I don’t like the Spectator’s new website design Has it been gentrified?

    • Man on the Clapham omnibus

      I also don’t like the new website design; these website “refreshes” are more often than not make work schemes for the nerds.

      • ramesesthegrumbler

        Nerds need employment too and face the same enrichment as the working classes. When your salary has been reduced from above average to well below by FTVs you may be grateful for some make work too.

      • davidshort10

        I don’t like it either. Less on the page. It means I have to clear my searches more frequently to get the magazine for free. I was a subscriber for 25 years until the Barclay Brothers brought in that awful man, Andrew Neil, who destroyed the quality of the Sunday Times. I had a £2.99 Kindle subscription but now have even ended that as a protest against that awful person.

    • Patricia

      Agree with both points.

    • red2black

      There were quite a few comments that were posted before yours which appear to have been removed for some reason.

    • edithgrove

      It’s certainly been swished up a bit. It’ll take a week or two to settle in and then it should be fine, I imagine.

  • post_x_it

    “…liberal elite that predates upon them.”
    Predates upon?

    • Man on the Clapham omnibus

      Quite right; the passion for “verbalising” nouns is as American, as it is irritating and should be resisted. And were one to “verbalise” predator the result would not predate prey.

      • post_x_it

        Oh, is that what you think it is?
        ‘Predate’ is actually a verb, but it has nothing to do with predator/prey. It means something that came before something else (pre-date).
        Either way, Rod’s use doesn’t make any sense.

        • Man on the Clapham omnibus

          If you had been paying attention you would have noticed that I had used predate as verb in relation to prey: however it is not a valid “verbalisation” – if such a word exists – of predator, which was what Rod was seeking – perhaps he try “predatorize”!

        • MikeF

          The use of ‘predate’ to mean ‘prey upon’ seems fairly well-established. Yes a word with exactly the same spelling can mean ‘to be in existence before’ something else. The difference is in the pronunciation – in the former case the ‘e’ is short as in ‘egg’, in the latter stretched as in ‘keep’. Sometimes words that are both spelt and pronounced the same can have diametrically opposed meanings e.g. ‘endorse’ meaning either to approve of or as in endorsement of a driving license formally to record a misdemeanour.

    • PapaDocPenfro

      “Predate: act as a predator (of); catch and eat (prey)”
      (Shorter OED)

      • mdj

        ‘Preys’, in other words. A punchier usage that predates ‘predates’.

  • DennisMcScumbag

    Good Article.

    The following comedian shares this view and should really be the next big thing in comedy…

    Youtube – Sam Hyde — Migrant Crisis stand-up routine — Sept. 29th, 2015

  • Peter Stroud

    What is it with this so called gentrification, and such an idiotic idea as a cereal cafe? As far as I know, there are two broad types of gentry: townie gentry, and country gentry. The townies use gentlemen’s clubs, and the country gentry use the village pub. Both entertain when they are ‘at home.’ I can’t imagine either frequenting the cafe in question. Dear me, no! Nevertheless, it is a very good article: especially the reference to Redcar.

  • Strativarius

    Class war? Old middle class tossers against new middle class tossers is an intra class war

  • Patricia

    “The working classes don’t get the cheap nannies and plumbers and taxis and cleaners; they can’t afford that stuff, anyway. They just lose their jobs as a consequence or see their incomes halved by a secondary labour force which is there for the sole benefit of the affluent. And they get the muzzein’s wail and the street harassment and the crime and the annihilation of their culture as a sort of bonus.”

    Brilliantly put Rod. You speak for the ordinary working people who have no voice.

    • victor67

      No he speaks for billionaires like Murdoch and the Barclay brothers. Whopay him a considerable sum.

      He is their ” working class” tool engaging in what as know as mushroom journalism
      It involves keeping you in the dark and feeding you bullshit.

      • ill-liberal

        Ah yes, it’s a conspiracy, obviously, couldn’t possibly be how many people think.

        Idiot

        • victor67

          Your name says it all.keep nursing your grievances and your prejudices and thin king Rodney is your man.

          • ill-liberal

            I will thanks. I just love being brain washed by the right wing media,as we all do here. Couldn’t possibly be that you’re wrong and we’re right.

            Go back to your beloved, free thinking Guardian or wherever you correct thinkers hang out these days.

      • rodliddle

        I don’t “speak for them”, you silly tit.

        • victor67

          Touched a nerve Rodney!
          I wait with anticipation for you to dish the dirt on the dirty digger and Wendy in the Scum.

          • davidshort10

            I think Liddle is right. You are a silly tit.

          • Observer1951

            I have to disagree he’s not a silly tit, the correct expletive is tw.t

          • rodliddle

            He thinks he is in sole possession of the truth, and the rest of us are either careerist scum or morons. It is the quintessence of psychopathic leftist stupidity and arrogance.

          • rodliddle

            No you didn’t “touch a nerve”. And obviously if you wait for something it would be with anticipation.

          • victor67

            Ok Rod looking forward to you putting your “journalistic expertise” to expose Murdoch global tax avoidance schemes.
            Or maybe stick to your limited abilities of venting your spleen against muslim’s and women

          • rodliddle

            Muslim’s what?

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Simply a victim of Britain’s flawed state education system, where many assume that a word ending in “S” (even a plural term) takes an apostrophe. As a resident of UK Trash Culture you would realise this, surely.

          • Labour Mole Catcher

            Your English pretty “sucks” as well if you use Americanisms such as “trash” and you are older than 16 years of age!

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            English as a second language, right? So where are you from, Jock? Or can I call you China boy?

          • Labour Mole Catcher

            Robbing your own Mum and Dad to buy crystal meth?! (You are obviously on them at the moment!) What kind of a Japanese son are you?!

      • blandings

        “…… mushroom journalism. It involves keeping you in the dark and feeding you bullshit.”

        http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/b6/b6509c42a9c5080a725f2753a4886953d79bd8266d8ebb5b4e8f5756eeba9ea1.jpg

      • Dogsnob

        So how come he sounds not one bit like the vast majority of the people who are paid a considerable sum by the Fat Controllers? A great many lines are being toed, but not in this corner.

        We are festooned with bullshit, and darkness abounds. The points raised in this article make that very case.

        Sounds like you have given up taking in information as it develops; you can’t face the fact that the developments undermine your agglomerated and ossified position.

        • victor67

          A press owned by 5 tax evading billionaires that are little more than lobbyists for the Tory party.
          There was virtually no critical analysis of the Governments record at the last election.

          • Dogsnob

            There’s that deaf ear again.

          • Solage 1386

            ‘ear ‘ear.

        • Solage 1386

          Ossified position? You are the dog’s bollocks.

    • red2black

      ‘ordinary working people who have no voice’ helped to elect a majority Conservative government a few months ago.

      • Patricia

        True – but their voices are still not heard at ground level.

        • red2black

          That’s up to them. I suspect that most of them are too busy with other things.

      • twi5ted

        and likely the 3.8 million ukip votes 12.6% of the vote and 1 seat lol

        • red2black

          Perhaps you consider your vote and that of others to be more important than the number of ‘seats’ they secure?

          • Ringstone

            It’s an inconvenient fact that seats, not votes, make power, makes the opportunity to actually change things. A moral victory carries no clout.

          • red2black

            I’m not a UKIP supporter, but it doesn’t seem right that so many votes are rewarded with so little representation.

        • Jankers

          everybody saw the strings with that one.

      • Dogsnob

        A voice in a rigged system. How to make it better?

        • red2black

          FPTP / PR / OMOV type of issue?

          • Dogsnob

            Just vote UKIP, see how they deal with that.

          • red2black

            I haven’t seen them deal with anything yet.

          • Dogsnob

            No no, the ‘they’ I refer to are the main parties.

          • red2black

            Sorry for the misunderstanding.

          • UKSteve

            Waste of a vote.

          • Dogsnob

            Why?

    • porcelaincheekbones

      Class war is replacing the poor.

      • Swarm of Drones

        That’s right. Lefties are ganging up on other lefties over the price of imported cereal. TTIP will put a swift end to this nonsense.

        • awesomesauce

          You can’t possibly have money and be a lefty at the same time.

          That’s the Julia Heartless-Brewdog type of argument the dumbed down hard left press (who control this country chaps, dontcha know it) continues to repackage and hard-sell day in day out.

          • PeteTongue

            No no no, now that YOU are saying it, the hard left are NOT controlling the press and this country.

        • Abie Vee

          TTIP will put a swift end to democracy and sovereignty too.

          • PeteTongue

            With TTIP there will be no £4.50 bowl of cereal.

          • Abie Vee

            really? What control will TTIP have over retail mark-up and gross profit margins? Um… none. I

            I’ll be amazed if American GM crops and steroid-fed cattle are allowed in. Oh yes, Cameron wouldn’t block them, left to his own devices, but I expect the EU to.

          • red2black

            Is this what Europe and North America have been shipping their cheap-as-chips immigrant workforces in for?

          • PeteTongue

            you are a really clever girl Abie

          • Abie Vee

            It wouldn’t be hard to be cleverer than you.

          • nicnac

            It’s October. Shouldn’t you be back at uni? Haven’t you got an essay to write?

          • Abie Vee

            Indeed. This is my subject.

          • But we won’t be in the EU quite soon Abie. What then?

          • Abie Vee

            I can hazard a guess, if you like ; Scotland will leave the UK and re-join the EU and live happily ever after ; the insular English will largely close their borders to immigration while English emigration will continue unabated as more rats leave the sinking ship; the population will begin to decline rapidly (the replacement rate for a population is 2.4 births per female… already British born women are reproducing below the replacement rate at 1.8).

            Meanwhile, the aged will continue to increase in number and live longer putting ever increasing strain upon the workforce who support them by their taxes and National Insurance. As the demographic imbalance continues to rise, income tax will start at 50 p in the pound to pay for unfunded English pension liabilities and healthcare. Workers will seek higher wages to compensate which will be passed on to consumers by price increases, encouraging hyper inflation. Abroad our exports suffer a major decline as increased production costs price our products out of world markets. The rich and large corporations will move their operations overseas to more productive lands.

            After that the picture gets a bit murky. I think England will probably turn itself into a theme park “Olde England” a playground for rich Chinese tourists. The English people themselves (those who don’t emigrate) will become a nation of table-waiters tour guides and chambermaids.

          • Richard

            I have another vision. Mass immigration from Islamic lands, and the arrival of vast numbers of economic migrants from the EU as part of Germany’s redistribution of people it has invited in will place so much pressure on our public services that taxes will have to go up. Many more mosques will be built. Jews and homosexuals will be killed on the streets, as happens in many Islamic lands. The EU will create a presidency, and we will be forced to obey whatever they – Germany – decides is in their interests. The NHS will collapse. There will be a shortage of blood donors and organ donors because non-white migrants simply don’t care to participate in donations, but are more likely to need them. There will be fighting between the migrant groups, as we see already happening. Britain will be reduced to the level of Egypt.

          • Abie Vee

            I’ll have a gram of what you’re on.

          • Richard

            Ad hominem attacks. The stock-in-trade of the Left.

          • Abie Vee

            Nightmare visions of Armageddon: stock in trade panic-mongering by the rabid Right.

            It goes like this: All you have to do is to tell people they are under attack, that their way of life is endangered, and denounce the opposition as traitors.

            Simple innit? Your German pen-friend will be able to shed some light on that for you , of that I’m sure.

          • nicnac

            Is that why the left is always banging on about the dreaded right wing backlash: stock in trade panic mongering. It goes like this etc. etc……

          • Abie Vee

            What right wing backlash? It’s been on-going and permanent since 1979.

          • Abie Vee

            Humour, dear. You should try it. If more people had laughed at AH the world would be a better place.

          • robbydot

            If more people laughed at the bloody prophet, piss be upon him, the world would be a much better place.

          • Abie Vee

            You might be right there. And, um: “This Jesus myth has served us well.” Pope Leo X.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Leo X: Now that’s a dude that knew a good scam when he saw one.

          • Abie Vee

            Exactly. Religion can never reform mankind, because religion is slavery.

          • Abie Vee

            Humour, dear. You should try it. If more people had laughed at AH the world would be a better place.

          • St Louis

            It’s too late for you. You’ve been re-programmed.

          • akimo4

            A prophet. Greetings from a German aghast of whats happening here

          • Jankers

            you lost it at ‘guess’

          • red2black

            “Summers like what we ‘ad in the 1950s.”

          • Abie Vee

            Every man has his price, they say. Your’s is obviously under £4.50.

          • Vera

            We’ve already lost sovereignty, didn’t you notice?

          • Abie Vee

            Some, but not all. TTIP will finish the job.

        • Minstrel Boy

          It could escalate into another Corn Laws war, such as be-devilled relationships between the British and Irish back in the 1840’s. That didn’t end well.

    • Abie Vee

      Not a shred of evidence for your wail of entitlement. Wages are depressed because the economy is depressed, because Europe is depressed, because the USA is depressed , as are the one mighty BRICS, with the possible exception of India (wherein the Kippers once placed all their faith and hopes).

      When (if) things rebound so will wages. It really is that simple. The incompetent government is happy with useful idiots blaming tall heir woes on immigration: by God it takes the heat of them!

      • Steed

        There is plenty of evidence to show that mass immigration brings does wages for the lowest paid.

        The only idiots here are people like you who fail to understand the facts.

        • Abie Vee

          Ah, I see, “for the lowest paid”. In which case you are saying that wage competition is greatest among the immigrant community itself. Not many people would deny that. Immigrants, unless they are particularly qualified, normally enter into employment at the bottom of the chain, competing with each other for menial jobs that the natives don’t want anymore, hoping to work their way up the chain from there. That is how it has always worked.

          You people always claim there’s PLENTY of evidence, but you can produce nothing but hearsay in support of that claim. I listened to all that crp in my childhood. Crp about the “dirty Irish” coming over here after the war, stealing “our” jobs and undercutting wages. I can tell you for certain that if there was any truth in that story, it didn’t last five minutes! Absolute fortunes were made in the building trade as rates for skilled men soared, driven by the Irish!

          The government has recently showed that wages are at long last returning to their pre-2008 global crash levels. Better late than never. Economists are saying that the rate of wage increase is about to rise much more faster.

          Well now, you tell me. Immigration is at its highest levels ever, yet wages are rising. How does that work?

          • red2black

            Is anything really sustainable as long as the government is borrowing £2bn a week?

          • Abie Vee

            Indeed it is. That £2 billion is also a gilt-edged investment. Investment very largely (70%+) from British institutions… and from anyone with a pension scheme, a deposit or saving account, a share portfolio or even an overdraft.

            Borrowing money over a 30 year term at the lowest interest rates on record makes astonishingly good sense. One would be an idiot not to!

          • red2black

            How are the repayments going?

          • Abie Vee

            Over 30 years? A piece of cake. Borrow good pounds today, invest them in infrastructure, pay back the borrowed sum in 30 years with Mickey Mouse currency.

            Inflation and devaluation takes care of most of it.

          • red2black

            I suspect you’re being facetious. Where do these British institutions get so much money from, and who controls the interest rates?

          • red2black

            I suspect you’re being facetious. Where do these British institutions get so much money from, and who controls the interest rates?

          • Abie Vee

            Besides the point. The vast and overwhelming amount of money comes from investors in hedge funds, mutual funds, pension funds and the like, oh and from The Masters of the Universe.
            Interest rates? That’d be the National Bank.

          • red2black

            Now I know you are.

          • Steed

            “In which case you are saying that wage competition is greatest among the immigrant community itself. Not many people would deny that.”

            You spout completely missing the argument. Confirmation bias or just stupidity? The point is that mass immigration causes

            “You people always claim there’s PLENTY of evidence, but you can produce nothing but hearsay in support of that claim.”

            No, you are just too stupid to do a quick google search. Here’s a source for you, it’s Oxford University – that good enough for you? http://www.migrationobservatory.ox.ac.uk/briefings/labour-market-effects-immigration

            This shows that wages for those at the bottom end are suppressed by mass immigration. There isn’t a debate about this anymore – except in your head.

            “I listened to all that crp in my childhood. Crp about the “dirty Irish” coming over”

            The problem with idiots like you is that everything becomes about identity politics – I belong to this group and I label myself thus. I’m British, and care about the British people first. I do not want to victimise or discriminate against one nationality over another, I simply think that there is an optimal level of immigration and adding 1m people to the population every three years is unsustainable and not in the best interests of the British people. This logic is clearly beyond you.

            “Well now, you tell me. Immigration is at its highest levels ever, yet wages are rising. How does that work?”

            Again, you are too simple to realise that an average rise in wages hides huge disparities. Wages for the lowest paid are not really rising at all, and have been stagnant (or falling) since 2003 – so it doesn’t work for the poorest, just like the article says.

            Tell me, how can you keep your head in the sand about mass immigration negatively affecting the poorest in our society?

          • Abie Vee

            “Confirmation bias” wails he while running to Oxford for help and support. Good grief. And who says irony doesn’t travel well on this media…

            Bet that as it may. Your Oxford chums reported this: “The available research shows that adverse wage affect of immigration are likely to be the greatest for workers who are themselves immigrants”. Which was my main point. As I recall, they quote an average figure of less than 1% overall (adding that immigration actually increases wages the higher up the skill chain you look)

            It is difficult, if not impossible, to prove a direct correlation between immigration and low wage rates. The situation is far more complex than that. If anyone persuades you otherwise, they’re lying.

            Unionisation in the low wage sector is much weaker than in other sectors, and there is a general absence of collective bargaining and collective wage agreements. Far bigger players are on this murky scene… businesses and government. The stampede towards out-sourcing and privatisation has resulted in wholesale attacks upon workers pay and conditions … job insecurity, zero-hours and minimum pay terms and conditions proliferate everywhere. This attack enables and supports the tendency of business in this sector to break the law with apparent impunity. I doubt you’ll find there have been ANY convictions worth mentioning of employers paying below the legal limit. In this respect, the government pays only lip service to the law.

            The current narrative about job-taking or wage suppression are in fact only modern re-workings of the old “lump of labour” argument… the idea that there is only a set amount of work in the system, and thus one-in means one-out. This concept is without foundation (as your Oxford MO acknowledges). Job markets are dynamic and change rapidly and substantially, growing and shrinking in one sector today, another tomorrow. Immigrants are pulled into (and thrown out of) this dynamic at will according to demand. Like the rest of us.

            Immigrants, like everyone else, are a part of this problem, but, like everyone else, they do not cause it. You must look elsewhere for the real bogeymen!

            Incidentally, and only tangentially, while I’m here, NIESR had this to say : “… the debate between what they cost [immigrants] and what they contribute is firmly weighed towards a very substantial contribution.”

            My confirmation bias versus your cognitive dissonance.

          • Steed

            “”Confirmation bias” wails he, while running to Oxford for help and support. ”

            What does that even mean? So Oxford University is not an unbiased resource?

            “Which was my main point.”

            But not mine nor that of the article. It’s like you’ve been asked one question and answered another. What is clear though, is that you don’t want to put the interests of the British people first.

            “It is difficult, if not impossible, to prove a direct correlation between immigration and low wage rates. The situation is far more complex than that. If anyone persuades you otherwise, they’re lying.”

            No it is not. There are a number of peer reviewed studies which show there is a direct correlation. There are several referenced in the above link.

            “re-workings of the old “lump of labour” argument…”

            No. This is why I called you an idiot before, and in fact why most cheerleaders of immigration are incapable of rational discussion. I stated that there is an optimal level for immigration (I should have added type to this as well) – had my argument been the “lump of labour” argument I would have argued that no immigration is the right level. People like you are seemingly incapable of talking about what would be the right level of immigration, or even the factors you would take into account. As far as you’re concerned it’s all good, there is no downside – which just is not true. Rotherham for example.

            “You must look elsewhere for the real bogeymen!”

            This argument is a false one. What you are saying is that just because there are inequalities elsewhere in society that you shouldn’t question immigration policy?

            “Incidentally, and only tangentially, while I’m here, NIESR had this to say : “… the debate between what they cost [immigrants] and what they contribute is firmly weighed towards a Incidentally, and only tangentially, while I’m here, NIESR had this to say : “… the debate between what they cost [immigrants] and what they contribute is firmly weighed towards a very substantial contribution.””

            Define “very substantial contribution.” – as it directly contradicts the work of the LSE CREAM study which showed that immigrants make a lower contribution than the indigenous population. Again, your argument is too simplistic. Some migrants make a fantastic contribution, others are a large net drain. Trouble is that we don’t discriminate between good migrants and the ones who aren’t up to scratch.

            “My confirmation bias versus your cognitive dissonance.”

            Nope. My facts against your overly simplistic and “let’s talk about something else” pseudo arguments.

            The difference between you and me is that I want the optimal amount and type of immigration, and you just want to throw open the borders regardless of the social cost. One is logic, one is a lack of logic.

          • Abie Vee

            You’re right. I do not want to put the interests of the British people first. What a meaningless and stupid generalisation. What do you actually mean, British jobs for British shirkers? Is that it? You’re entitled!? You’re entitled to preferential treatment because of the sheer happenstance of your place of birth. Ridiculous. No I don’t agree with that at all.

            “Rotherham” you trill, expecting to lure me into the defence of rapists. Tsk… how childish. I believe in human rights… equally of treatment for everybody. All that can be demanded of anyone in this country is that they obey the law of the land and pay their taxes. Otherwise, pay the consequences. That’s all. Nothing more. Zilch.

            The several links “referenced in the above link” should you ever care to explore them all , actually corroborate much of what I have said.

            “Define” you say? You first. Define “British people”; define their “interests”. Define how those interests are in the National interest.

            Your “right level” is purely subjective. Nothing more than guesswork and emotions. Demographics alone have led the Government to conclude (through OBR, ONS, and Eurostat projections) that a total population of 77-80 million will be required by 2050 to pay for the pensions and healthcare of an expected 20 million+ pensioners by then (www, parliament. uk).

            So if you want a “right level” start with 80 million and take it from there. By the middle of the next century it will be half as much again. And seeing as how native-born women are now breeding well below the natural replacement rate, there is no rational alternative other than to make up that shortfall with immigration. Well, there are alternatives.. increase income tax to a starting rate of 50p in the pound; means test the state pension; increase NI contributions by 50% and remove upper limits; reduce the level of state pension; extend the retirement date to 70; limit free healthcare provision for the elderly and so forth. I’d love to see the government try to run that past the massed ranks of 20 million crumblies. They’d be out on their ear in no time.

            That’ll do for now. I shall return.

          • Abie Vee

            Tsk… such an old sophist aren’t you. Even allowing for the questionable veracity of your bold statement that; “immigrants make a lower contribution that the indigenous population” (as one might expect as they disproportionately inhabit the lower paid jobs, for now) one would still have to acknowledge the fact that this assertion of itself does not contradict NIESR’s conclusion of a “very substantial contribution”. Placing the two comments side by side, the only logical conclusion to be drawn is that the natives contribute more. Quite how that fits alongside other figures which show that immigrants are less likely to use the NHS than natives, are less likely to be unemployed than the native population, are less likely to take up in-work benefits than the native population and are less likely to be in local authority accommodation than the native population, I can’t really say.

            Throw open the doors you say? Hmm.. I can’t remember ever supporting such hyper-exaggerated nonsense; perhaps you are confusing me with Moses Farage and his absurd “29 million Romanians” ! To use the Goldilocks analogy, I think the current level is not too hot, not too cold, just about right. For now.

          • Sue Smith

            Yes, logic versus lack of logic. And when it does go pear-shaped the left will call out, “look over there …. to the right”!!!!!

            Unable, absolutely, to accept any responsibility for their infantile demands. I re-iterate: the left doesn’t think, it EMOTES.

          • marc biff

            As a skilled man my hourly rate has gone from £14.51 in 2001 to £12.65 in 2015 doing exactly the same job in exactly the same place,the only difference is the appearance of East European “skilled”labour over the last 14 years.what other explanation is there?

          • Abie Vee

            See above, “explanations”.

            Add to that the global economic slowdown. Add to that Osborne’s crazy austerity programme. Add to that the TFSE 100’s average CEO’s pay has risen has risen over the same period to an average of 131 times the pay of their average employees. In 1998 CEO average pay was only (i say “only”) 47 times that of their average employees.

            And that’s just averages… some CEOs now pull several hundred times their employees salaries! WPP: Michael Sorrel, 780 x. Next: Simon Wolfon, 480 x. Whitbread: Andy Harrison, 415 x. SAB Miller: Alan Clark, 365 x. And so it goes, and that’s to say nothing of enhanced pension packages and share options!

            What they are doing is stealing your wages for themselves. And the governments of Blair, Brown and Cameron have overseen this explosion of looting. Osborne so approves that he gave them all massive tax reductions.

            And it’s all those pesky immigrant’s fault.

          • marc biff

            what kind of salary are you on and for what,sucking on the taxpayers teet like so many of you self righteous f**kers are.I know what i see and i know what we as a workforce are experiencing all because a bunch of brain dead socialist assholes wanted to rub the rights nose in diversity,thanks a bunch.BTW “innit”are you taking the piss?

          • Abie Vee

            Yes dear. Bury your head in ignorance. It saves a lot of hard thinking. Your simplistic reasoning goes something like this, if I may paraphrase: I am poor. Immigrants are here. Therefore, I am poor because of immigrants .

            That is commonly known as an inductive fallacy. A text book example. Well done.

            No dear, I’m happily retired. Living in some comfort courtesy of the Sate Pension (to which I and my employers contributed the requisite number of years National Insurance Contributions) and my two occupational pensions to which we also generously contributed.

            “Innit” is common parlance around Ackney and Stokey: innit.

          • marc biff

            I am not from Ackney and Stokey where ever the bloody hell they are and what employers?

          • Abie Vee

            It’s where urricanes ardly ever appen. Innit.

            What employers? Why do you want to know that? All I will say is that they were two very large and very well known enterprises. Ah me… the good old days, when a job was a job for life (if you wanted it) and the companies valued and looked after their employees (no truck with zero-hours and minimum wages then). Not like today’s greedy bstard employers keeping all the profits for themselves.

            We had decent people in those days, fair people, old families, running the concerns… not faceless offshore tax avoiding thieves of today.

            And it’s all the immigrants fault? Yeah right.

          • marc biff

            State or private ,anyway you are retired ,you are out of the game thank your lucky stars and you will be dead and buried when the real shit hits the fan i hope you don’t live near any large cities good luck any way.

        • Sue Smith

          The same thing has been said in Australia: immigrants will work for much lower wages, thus reducing these wages nationally! There IS a God!!!

      • Thomas

        This is such a stupid thing to say. Wages almost certainly will rise with a better global economy, but using that to deny that immigration has any effect on wages is absolutely ridiculous.

        • Abie Vee

          It is not ridiculous. There’s not a shred of evidence that immigration depresses indigenous wages.

          • Steed

            Liar. Why would there be several peer reviewed studies that show this?

            Are you an idiot or a troll? Both perhaps?

          • Abie Vee

            Routine reply as expected. Been there, done that. Go on then, over to you: which ones?

          • Steed

            “The effects of immigration on workers within specific wage ranges or in specific occupations are more significant. The greatest wage effects are found for low-waged workers. Dustmann et al (2013) find that each 1% increase in the share of migrants in the UK-born working age population leads to a 0.6% decline in the wages of the 5% lowest paid workers and to an increase in the wages of higher paid workers. Similarly, another study focusing on wage effects at the occupational level during 1992 and 2006, found that, in the unskilled and semi-skilled service sector, a 1% rise in the share of migrants reduced average wages in that occupation by 0.5% (Nickell and Salaheen 2008).”

            From http://www.migrationobservatory.ox.ac.uk/briefings/labour-market-effects-immigration

          • Abie Vee

            So er, all this is about road sweepers then? What a way to run a campaign.

          • Steed

            So you now admit that mass immigration pushes down wages for the lowest paid?

          • Abie Vee

            Or Syria?

          • Thomas

            I’m sure you believe that, but how many shreds of evidence there are available suggesting immigration depresses wages is irrelevant. Your claim that wages can’t possibly be effected through immigration because wages are all down to global economy is what’s ridiculous.

          • Abie Vee

            Um, I didn’t say it was “all” down. At least, I don’t think I did. Executive pay, perks and bonuses is another jolly good place to start sniffing.

            If you work for a FTSE 100 company, and say you earn £700 a week, your CEO alone will be trousering at least £92,000 a week basic, plus share options and la di da. And that’s an average figure. Some CEO’s earn five/six/seven hundred times the wage of their average employees! Imagine that! It is, of course, theft. Theft of their employees pay.

    • jasoli

      And have overwhelming competition for affordable homes.

  • dwarfpoo

    If two blokes selling cereal acquire and pay for the premises, provide jobs and pay taxes that would suggest that anyone with the means could get of their arses and do likewise. What is endemic is the 1 /under funding in the education of white working class boys 2/ social housing is now predominantly taken over and turned into multicultural slums : requests to London Councils for ethnic status of successful applicants have been declined with various reasons including they do not keep the data, of course they keep the data. Hate crimes against white people is on the rise and under reported. i work with people across a broad spectrum and my friends live in little bubbles, collect clothes for Calais refugees. One such charity declined used clothes and wanted new clothes to send to Calais, really?. l have told my son, work hard at school and move country, they do not like you if you are a white male!

    • mdj

      Did the charity collector also decline womens’ clothing?

      • dwarfpoo

        Calais! they don’t need womens clothing

        • Patricia

          I don’t think they need men’s clothing either. The “asylum seekers” I saw a few months ago were very well dressed – and not by courtesy of well meaning libs.

          • Sue Smith

            Why weren’t they back at home protecting families and helping protect the nation? I ask again, “what would Europe look like today if the French had abandoned France in 1791”? Oh wait…..

          • Patricia

            ” ….what would Europe look like today if the French had abandoned France in 1791″? Oh wait…..

            Yes indeed. Do these thoughts not occur to anyone else ?

        • mdj

          This, we know! But when you ask them why, it gets a bit uncomfortable…

        • Sue Smith

          That’s right – they’re all wearing “suffocating female containment units” (Bill Maher).

    • grammarschoolman

      If the white working class boys didn’t spend their entire time pissing around in class, then maybe more people would be inclined to spend their time educating them.

      • dwarfpoo

        or…if white working class boys had the same funding directed as ethnic minorities with earlier flags + the same one to one help with classroom assistants as children that do not speak English. If schools had space and not a constant noise problem from construction of new classes due to the “boom” in birthrates. If Boys were privy to an education that was more suited as research shows for decades there has been a feminisation of the curriculum. Your comment is such a boring generalisation.

        • Kin62

          The answer is probably a bit of both though isn’t it?

          • dwarfpoo

            yes of course. Schools have to deal with some very troubled children, if the schools try to isolate these children they are marked down by Ofsted. Male teachers are so important in schools.

      • Dogsnob

        Chicken. Egg?

        • Sue Smith

          No; cup/ball, ball/cup!!

          • Dogsnob

            Genius wasn’t he?

          • Sue Smith

            Totally!!

      • red2black

        Grammar school discipline would put a stop to most of that.

        • dwarfpoo

          Ofsted now will downgrade comprehensives for excluding kids that are aggressive and disruptive. Head teachers downgrade serious infractions and assaults due to inspections + preserve their own job.

          • red2black

            Happy days.

      • Sue Smith

        You’ve got it in one!! I used to say to my students (high school) I’m offering you a first class free education – at absolutely no cost to you. Don’t complain that you cannot make a go of it. Nobody will be interested in listening to your complaints!!

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      I contacted a charity to give away appliances when I was selling up and flying the UK coop, and the dude that showed up said they wanted nearly new machines. “Our clients may be impoverished but they have their pride.”
      “Suit yourself. Let them eat cake.”

      • dwarfpoo

        Dignity I was told. Decent clothes rejected this end , they prefer the money now. I hope many rethink donating and give to the real destitute on our own streets.

      • Observer1951

        Had the same problem. A national homeless charity would not take our 3 year old sofa because there was some slight ruffing on one leg caused by our cat. Not good enough for people who cannot afford furniture! What the hell is going on in this country. I subsequently found a local small charity who thought the article was perfect

        • Vera

          Perhaps nearly new contributions are sold on rather than given to those in need.

      • Labour Mole Catcher

        Your butt plugs?!

        • Jackthesmilingblack

          The deranged, like the poor are always with up. But sadly, the misguided Spectator provides this particulat lunatic with a forum.

          • Labour Mole Catcher

            Been looking at a mirror lately?!

  • Roger Hudson

    I was taught never to trust men with beards and only eat porridge for breakfast.

    • Frank Marker

      Gulp. That’s me done up like a kipper then.

      • red2black

        “Porridge? …You’ll be lookin’ at a fifteen to twenty stretch, Frankie…”

        • Frank Marker

          Well if I do go down I think I will be able to keep my honour intact, as these days I don’t look anything like my byline photo. Phew!

          • red2black

            “Bendin’ over for the faith an’ ‘ope when yer in the Eiffel Towers ain’t a good idea, Frankie… Not in when yer in Jimmy Nail it ain’t, Frankie… Frank?

  • Des Demona

    It is not ”an anathema” it is simply ‘anathema’.
    Thank you.
    P Dent

    • blandings

      “It is not ”an anathema” it is simply ‘anathema'”

      I wouldn’t want to cross swords with an expert but I thought anathema was a noun. In which case using an article is correct. We often use it without an article, as an adjective – that’s the odd thing.

  • Hipsters are just the harmless but weird-looking worker ants of gentrification:

    http://semipartisansam.com/2015/09/29/cereal-killer-cafe-vs-the-selfish-anti-gentrification-mob/

    Rod correctly identifies the real enemies – those who cloak their naked economic self interest in the fatuous language of altruistic multiculturalism.

  • MikeF

    I wonder how many of the protestors went home afterwards to nice neat little houses in ‘mimsy ghettoes’.

    • red2black

      It seems that the earliest comments posted here, some of which claimed that Class War adherents are mainly working class, were removed for some reason. I wanted to reply to posts by SeanL and Liberanos, but their comments had vanished.

      • MikeF

        That is just the teething problems of the new website – I think

        • red2black

          Perhaps, but claims in some of the comments that vanished did seem to undermine the premise of the article. Still, small beer in the scheme of things.

  • NavyBlueMoon

    Life imitates art. “Dr” Lisa Mackenzie – Peter Simple’s Ken Slabb come to life.

  • Steamy left-on-left action. They only people they hate more than the rest of us are each other

    • freddiethegreat

      Remember this?
      Below a dark forest in caves of black granite
      The children of darkness dwelled in oblivion
      Betraying one another in endless confusion
      But the Lord of the Dark had bewitched them

  • mdj

    Can one rent Class War by the hour? Who would have guessed that two posers with a twee, worthless product could command such a wave of national sympathy overnight? How much would such PR cost, could one buy it?

    • dwarfpoo

      don’t buy it then! same price or less than a full english breakfast in London, don’t hear of local cafes being vandalised over a sausage and egg sarnie.

      • mdj

        You’ve misread me, unless you intended to reply to somebody else.

        I wouldn’t buy it, as it happens; but we agree that it’s a mystery that selling cereal at a retail mark-up inspires so much more venom than doing the same for coffee or sandwiches.

        • dwarfpoo

          sorry , I may have. There is a cafe that has cats in London so you can buy a bun and stroke a cat, it is popular and keeps people in a job. All harmless gimmicks that bring people in. Coco pops v killer fried tomatoes.

          • blandings

            “so you can buy a bun and stroke a cat,”
            At home I get the wife’s bun for free, but the cat charges.

          • dwarfpoo

            cats are utter tramps , beholden to none.

  • AJH1968

    I love seeing these confused a……..s protest against austerity and at the same time march in favour of taking more migrants (Germany has, we should do our bit). Who pays? Entrepreneurs risking elbow grease and capital or deluded numpties writing epiphanies you would not want to wipe your bottom with.

    • vieuxceps2

      Not sure if it’s possible to write an epiphany.

      • AJH1968

        Bad grammar; sorry.

  • WFB56

    Rod, they can’t say anything about Redcar because its the idiot energy policies of your beloved Ed Miliband and his overlord Brown, perpetuated by the Tory wimps that killed the place. Electricity is the biggest single cost in steel production and in the UK it costs twice as much as in Germany, three times as much as in China and almost six times what it costs in the US.

    Next to go, the car manufacturers – except of course, Bentley, RR, Aston, McLaren and Formula One – all toys for the dreaded rich folk .

    • rodliddle

      My beloved Ed? Not sure about that.

      • WFB56

        Okay, “beloved” was going too far, but surely that fits with your style.

  • stedman_dantes

    I feel a bit sorry for the cereal café chaps. £4 isn’t remotely outrageous a price for a bowl of cereal given that you can easily spend as much or more on a pint or a bowl of soup. Unfortunately for them they are the embodiment par excellence of the type of Shoreditch twat we have grown to know and not love. Ultimately though they’re doing nothing wrong, any more than any other café.
    And as Rod point out, Class War have no objection to the immense, apparently permanent, organised process by which working class English residents of London are being extinguished.

  • Suzy61

    McKenzie embarrassed herself beyond expectation on Newsnight a couple of nights ago.

    Unable to articulate her point and contradicting herself – a bemused Kirsty Wark let her off lightly.

    And….why are they always so damn ugly?

    • Mongo Part II

      their ugliness underpins their rage. They drew the genetic short straw and want to blame someone for it

      • ill-liberal

        Think that’s about right. Social outcasts who feel the need to drag the world down to their level because they are unable to compete. Kind of sums up socialism generally I guess.

        • Frank Marker

          If you can bear to have a look at their website. It’s full of bile and expletives. They appear to think that ‘F*ck the rich!’ is a reasoned argument. Yep, a bunch of embittered losers, and ugly to boot.

          • ill-liberal

            A real smelly bunch by the looks of them. Seem to want everything handed to them on a plate, lazy tw@ts.

          • red2black

            “Keep yer loaf dahn… It’s that Marker geezer again…”

          • Frank Marker

            O stone me! Look what the bleedin cat’s dragged in! I thought that old slapper Pat Butcher had sorted you out! 😉

          • red2black

            “Me Albert ‘Alls are still black an’ blue, Mr Marker…”

          • Frank Marker

            Yer can’t ball n chalk to the karzy for a jimmy riddle then?

          • red2black

            “Nah… crawlin’ rahnd on me biscuits an’ cheese… an Elliot Ness in me rows of houses… It don’t ‘alf pen an’ ink…”

          • Leave “the cat” out of this!

      • freddiethegreat

        I don’t know why, but left winger / progressives are always ugly.

        • Frank Marker

          I know I shouldn’t judge by looks but in Class War’s case I will make an exception. I think it is immaterial whether we see them as middle-class dropouts or bitter working class youths. The point about these tossers is most of them have never worked in their lives and certainly have no intention of either.

          • red2black

            Typical career politicians.

        • Sue Smith

          Awe, come on now. There are other people in the movement apart from Glenda Jackson! Think Jon Stewart, George Clooney (Rolex man), Robert Downey Jnr., and many many more… From their comfortable and smug positions of affluence they can look down on the great unwashed and make their faux caring pronouncements. Narcissism on steroids.

  • edithgrove

    ‘Class War is simply the provisional wing of the liberal elite’ made me laugh out loud. Great stuff though, and serious.

  • ViolinSonaten b minor.

    Rod what’s happened to all our comments from this morning, a huge bunch of us are missing
    from here. Assume the disqus server is struggling with this changeover.
    Will the comments reappear, or are they lost within the tunnels of blogosphere, having a party or whatever. No one is going to regurgitate posts now are they ?

    • red2black

      The disqus server seemed to be struggling with the idea that Class War may be working class rather than middle class, which wasn’t doing much for the premise of the article.

  • Murti Bing

    It’s the poor white working class who always get growled down on Question Time too, whenever they ask a question about immigration or the loss of their communities. This is an older phenomenon than the recent bout of Corbynitis – the left HATE the working class.

    • The_greyhound

      It’s interesting that the traditional road out of the working class – the grammar school – was an object of especial hatred to the left, despite most Labour education ministers having had a private education.

      • red2black

        Grammar schools exacerbate social division by removing the ablest from the working class.

        • dwarfpoo

          Not so sure about this, I have very mixed feelings. Whilst every child should have a decent chance at education , many children in school that struggle make life utter hell for the more able. Grammar schools and the 11 plus whilst unfair did give working class children a fighting chance to compete. The children who failed the 11+ would then have streaming in the secondary schools with the options to move up levels. Many less academic children do not want to sit in lessons that bore them, in the past these children had better options for learning a trade with direct links to proper apprenticeships. Less boys now are applying to University, they have less support in school and are falling behind. I think same sex grammar or comprehensives benefited boys.

          • red2black

            I’m from a working class class family and went to a very good grammar school for boys in the 1960s. Like you, I have very mixed feelings.

          • grammarschoolman

            I had exactly the same experience in the 1980s and it was by far the best thing that ever happened to me. No mixed feelings here.

          • alfredo

            ‘Less boys’? Lesser boys? Les Boys? Or Leslie Boyes, the well-known contortionist?

          • dwarfpoo

            pick and mix. all of em innit

          • Dogsnob

            Lesboes?

          • Sue Smith

            Garbos, yobbos, hobos – not more “oes”!!!

          • dwarfpoo

            You are right…that Grammar school ed was lost on me, i blame the nuns myself. Asking questions about sex ed was much more fun when the sisters were about.

          • Sue Smith

            LOL

        • alfredo

          So you should always bloody well stay in the class you’re born into and shut your mouth?

          • red2black

            I wouldn’t be commenting here if I thought that.

          • Sue Smith

            It’s when the mouth opens to spew garbage which becomes the dead give-away. No amount of grammar school education is going to serve you if, inside, you are a seething class warrior. Counter-intuitive.

        • grammarschoolman

          In which case, you acknowledge that comprehensives prevent the ablest from realising their potential, because if they did, they wouldn’t go into working class occupations when they grew up.

          In other words, abolishing grammar schools is a way of keeping down the brightest children from the working class.

          You have, presumably unintentionally, provided the best argument for grammar schools.

          • red2black

            I did mean in a general sense, not a personal one. As far as I’m concerned, the school I went to would have made a good benchmark for all secondary education. I find the idea of keeping any child down offensive. Perhaps such a process takes place when children are segregated at age eleven on the basis of academic ability. New Labour and the Conservatives have had plenty of time to reintroduce grammar schools, and Mr Major’s efforts to do so fell on deaf ears. I think Mrs Thatcher continued with the conversion to Comprehensives because it was all but done and dusted. Now we have Academies.

          • dwarfpoo

            working class occupations should not be sniffed at, many tradesmen are in a higher earning bracket than graduates.

          • right1_left1

            Working class occupations are absolutely vital to maintaining a decent healthy quality of life for all.

            Which is more important ?
            The abilitiy to design ( probably middle class ) and the ability to build ( probably a mixture of middle and working class ) an effective sewage system
            or
            the existence of sequestered academics knowing lots about many arcane things; doing little about anything useful and who occasianlly emerge on say Bragge’s In Our Time. or the personal tour de force Starkey’s History of the Tudors.

            Society NEEDS dustmen but could survive without Helen Mirran

          • Sue Smith

            Absolutely. And there are growing armies of discontented ‘academics’ who are ‘all dressed up with nowhere to go’. Then they join the Labour Party. Turns out it all OUR fault!!

          • Vera

            But society as we know it couldn’t survive without the clever and well-educated. It would surely collapse if everyone had only the education of the bottom class of a less than bog standard comprehensive.

          • right1_left1

            quote:But society as we know it couldn’t survive without the clever and well-educated
            Whether society would collapse is a moot poot.
            I dont think it would

            Consider Irish travellers who buy land, manipulate the planning system and over a few days transform that land into a tarmaced road surface with parking space for gas guzzler 4by4’s and bottled gas connections to their caravans In general they change a location so that it may be lived in.
            I assume you agree that none who do that are ‘well educated’ and posses not one degree between the lot of ’em ?

            The UK is awash with the ‘well educated’ who are living on welfare to work in different forms of admin employment.
            As more is spent on 3rdl level education the situation will get worse as more graduates become unemployable..

            I’m 100% in favour of education .
            What is crucial is what sort, who pays and what the graduates learn !

          • Vera

            Even travelers don’t live in complete isolation and depend on services provided by industry such as fuel for their trucks.

          • Sue Smith

            Absolutely spot on – particularly in Australia!!!

          • Vera

            Absolutely right but that doesn’t mean destroying grammar schools was the right policy.

          • dwarfpoo

            I agree.

        • Dogsnob

          How long now is it since the Grammar School system held sway? And how’s the amelioration of social division thing coming along?

          • red2black

            Held sway? I don’t think they ever really did, although many of them were fine schools. It will take far more than the reintroduction of selective grammar schools to ameliorate social division.

          • Dogsnob

            Held sway as in, operated freely.
            You now seem to be granting a degree of qualified credit to Grammar Schools: they’re positive but insufficient?
            Your former accusation was of their having exacerbated social division. They didn’t.

          • red2black

            I’ve said quite a few times elsewhere that the boys only selective grammar school that I went to would have been a good benchmark for all secondary education. I don’t agree with segregating children at age eleven based on academic ability because it’s socially divisive. All schools should be as good as grammar schools.

          • PasserBy

            Except that’s just not possible. Not to mention, how do you define good? Latin, History, Politics and English Literature may be good for someone is intellectual and capable enough to do very well at university, but should someone have to shuffle through that, get poor grades, spend three years and £50,000 at a former-polytechnic when in reality a trade education would have set him or her up better for a future career without wasting everyone’s time and making sure our country has the skills it needs in its workforce.

            I agree that 11 is a bit young to make that decision, but I think by the age of 13 or so, it should become clearer to children what is expected of them and to impress the importance of what they were doing. And of course, you should have the option of moving schools afterwards.

            In the public school I went to, we had a wide array of subjects which people took depending on what they wanted to do and we had different classes for different abilitities. Those who performed well in intellectual subjects were in the higher classes for them (5-A, 5-B, 5-C, etc) where teaching was altered to cope and adapt. Those who performed well in more physical subjects or subjects closer related to employment and trades were in their own areas or in the certain classes such as textiles, materials, PE, music, etc. It was pretty much a micro-cosm of the old grammer/other divide. And it worked very well.

            Right now, the current education system selects by wealth or connection. You have to live in a certain area to go to a certain school and because of that, you have to buy/rent a house close enough to the school to get your children to attend that school. No merit, no selection for ability. Nothing but how rich your parents are. Or you just go private and sod the lot. It’s probably cheaper to go private then to buy a house to attend a good comprehensive.

          • red2black

            I agree with most of what you say. What you describe doesn’t sound too far removed from what I experienced, and I think we’d both say our experiences were good. Of course, what constitutes good has to be decided and agreed. I’m glad we agree about segregation at eleven. Where I live, I don’t think most people have much choice or say in which school their kids go to, and I’d say that’s a sound reason why all schools should be good schools that can give every child a decent education.

          • Vera

            At my grammar school and others I believe, selection went on after the 11 plus. Pupils were moved out to secondary schools or came from secondary schools over the first couple of years, so selection at 11 wasn’t set in stone.

          • red2black

            I remember a small number of boys joining my school in the way you describe over the time I was there, but I’m not sure if any were sent to a secondary modern as part of the same process.

          • Dogsnob

            That’s the classic ‘baby out with the bathwater’ tactic.
            We all know that not all schools can be as good as grammar schools. Why should the reaction to that, be the comprehensive quagmire that exists across the whole system?

          • red2black

            You mean there are no good comprehensive schools?

          • Dogsnob

            There are some excellent comprehensive schools. They attain and maintain their excellence due to the astute manoeuvring of responsible parents who make their home in the catchment area. The area, understandably, becomes select.
            As such, the school has a ‘comprehensive’ intake restricted to a very narrow socio-economic stratum of the wider society.

          • red2black

            Which also leaves a lot of families, however interested or disinterested they may be, unable to move to an area with a better school; basically, because they can’t afford it.
            They’re stuck with the school or schools that serve the community they’re in. As you almost say, it’s selection based on affordability. There will always be schools that are better than others, but perhaps it would serve us all better if the gap between best and worst was narrowed.

          • Dogsnob

            Agreed. It’s the ‘how’ though?

          • Sue Smith

            All the world should be completely wonderful, too. Wishing it don’t make it so. There’s a little matter of parents not factored into this equation – and, frankly, many of them don’t give a damn or value their kids’ education anyway. There’s such a thing as ‘generational’ disadvantage and I’ve seen it when I was teaching: “I don’t need an education miss – I’m goin’ on the dole”.

          • red2black

            I agree with you. What’s done to children is done to the world.

          • Vera

            Indeed they should. Unfortunately not all children are born equal. No matter how good the schools there will always be those who fail to achieve anything at school.

          • red2black

            I agree with you.

          • Sue Smith

            Say again, “not all children are born EQUAL”? Sorry, ma’am – but there’s a whole social ideology now built on disclaiming that fact. All people equal!!

            Shows you just what unmitigated garbage it all is!!!

          • Sue Smith

            Can you please explain to this Australian the differences between ‘comprehensive’, ‘grammar’ and ‘private’ schools? I don’t get it.

          • Dogsnob

            We had Grammar Schools (a very few survive just as they did in the past, others just use the name to ride on the image).
            Grammar Schools used to scoop up the brighter kids, giving them access to a more academic curriculum, with the aim of entering ‘the professions’. The rest were educated with a view more towards entering a trade.
            By the 1950s/60s, the thinking was that this was an unfair system which consigned the majority to a second-rate education. The Grammar Schools were to be axed – replaced by a ‘Comprehensive’ system which would allow all to rise according to their abilities. Controversy abounds as to the success of this project.
            The label ‘private’ is, I think, more of a US thing, by which those who can afford it, pay for a – supposedly – higher quality education than that which is received by the mainstream.
            Rather weirdly, in the UK, schools which operate in that same way are termed ‘Public Schools’. Some attend on a daily basis, whereby they go home at the end of the school day; some offer ‘boarding’ which means the pupils actually live in halls within the school. Hence another term: ‘Boarding School’.
            To send a child to even the most affordable public schools is very expensive.
            Hope that helps.

          • Vera

            And when grammar schools held sway, apart from the truly rich only those whose children failed the 11 plus exam would consider sending their children to private schools. The education at many private schools was considered inferior to the grammar school education but private education gave your child polish and the right accent.

          • Sue Smith

            Thanks. These sound like our “selective state schools” where kids enter based on the results of their final primary year. I had 2 sisters who went to these from the Catholic system and they had to complete exams to get a place because they were not already in the state system.

            The reason they’ve largely been phased out (in Australia too) is that we live in a dumbed down socially engineered paradise where nobody is seriously encouraged to excel. Oh, they’ll SAY they do, but it’s all about improving “self esteem” for students; and if they get upset they feel depressed, suicidal or engage in ‘cutting’. I’m so bored with hearing this!!

            I knew one fellow who had been through your Grammar school system in England and he had a very working class background; he complained that there was snobbishness there and that he felt ‘ashamed’ of his own parents because of his own experience (which he wasn’t proud of!). I was surprised to hear from him that these were the children of doctors, accountants and other professionals – thinking it might be like Australia where those kids mostly go to private schools. (We have some excellent private schools which cost up to $30,000 per year!).

            All the same; no system is perfect and the one which gets you the short-cut to what you want is the way to go IMO!!

        • Darwin

          Labour politicians exacerbate social division by closing down grammar schools and sending their kids to private schools.

          • red2black

            They make it even worse. I’m not here to defend what Labour politicians do.

          • Darwin

            They drive the clever kids down to the level of the dumber kids or those who do not want to learn…I was at state school no point trying to lecture me on the ‘success’ of state schools.

          • red2black

            There were some extremely disruptive kids at the very good selective state grammar school I went to, and how whichever system is in place deals with them is an open issue. Where and when did I try to lecture you, or anyone else, on the success of state schools?

        • Vera

          You’re being sarcastic, aren’t you? Grammar schools were full of working class children who went to on to university, join the professions, get worth while jobs. Now the ablest working class children have little chance of moving out of the class they were born into. It was the ablest that did well, now it’s the wealthiest.

          • red2black

            Wealth has always had its advantages. I always felt that grammar schools did as much to reinforce the class system as they did to soften it.

      • grammarschoolman

        ‘because of’, not ‘despite’

      • Vera

        I read somewhere recently that Anthony Crosland and Shirley Williams who are the two most responsible for destroying grammar schools suddenly realized party leaders, Harold Wilson and Margaret Thatcher, were products of grammar schools. They were horrified that these ‘oiks’ were managing to climb so high up the greasy pole that they decided to do something to stop it. And they have almost succeeded. Most politicians, those that reach the highest levels in business, even top athletes are products of posh schools. The class divide is as wide as it’s ever been. And all done apparently to make opportunity fairer for all. If they had spent their energies instead on improving technical schools and secondary schools we might now have an education to be proud of.

    • red2black

      By far, most of the QT panellists, studio audience and television audience are middle class, so what else would you expect?

      • digiman47

        QT audience usually 90% Labour supporters. Don’t know what went wrong last night.

        • red2black

          They were in Wales.

  • The_greyhound

    “Sort of Emily Thornberry MP, with added spray paint.”

    It would be very ungallant to mention the immense quantities of paint that would be involved. I trust no one will.

  • Gergiev

    Excellent piece Rod

  • plainsdrifter

    “blue-collar areas of the city are being turned into mimsy ghettoes stocked with smug and affluent ‘hipsters’. Lefties, Rod. Come on, you are slipping.

    • Oedipus Rex

      No – I have anecdotal evidence that the ‘hipsters’ sometimes vote Tory; you know, ‘shy Tories’ – they never admit it in public. And it would make sense since they are running an upmarket business for the well off.
      Shoreditch was a weigh-the-vote dead cert Labour constituency for generations – let’s see what it is in a decade’s time, eh?

  • The Wiganer

    The easy way to test if someone is middle class is to ask to three simple questions.

    1. Do you host dinner parties?
    2. Do you use the word ‘Artisan’ for food and not metalwork?
    3. Can you taste the flavoursome bouquet in a bottle of wine?

    If the answer is yes, then you are middle class. Deal with it posh git.

    • red2black

      What time is dinner-time?
      Got it in one, squire.

    • Sardo_Numpsa

      You don’t think level of disposable income is more useful?

      • The Wiganer

        No because I know people who are quite wealthy, but have poor qualifications and who’s idea of bliss is watching rugby in the pub.

        Conversely I know people who are awfully middle class who are earning little over the average wage.

        • Sardo_Numpsa

          Your post proves the point I want make.

          I don’t really care if somebody prefers wine to lager, or football to rugby, that is meaningless in my opinion.

          Surely what’s far more relevant in determining which social stratum a person belongs to is their level of material comfort.

          I probably think about it differently being from foreign shores, the English attitude to class is confusing. I can’t get my head around people who live perfectly comfortable lives clinging to the label “working class” like it’s a badge of honour.

          • red2black

            I’m working class and live a comfortable life.

          • Sardo_Numpsa

            By which criteria do you consider yourself to be working class?

          • red2black

            Agreed ones.

          • Sardo_Numpsa

            Dare I ask which agreed ones?

          • red2black

            Most of them.

          • Sardo_Numpsa

            OK. Well as you are living comfortably I am sure you will understand if I don’t get too concerned with the plight of the working class, so-called.

          • red2black

            Same here, but too old for Rugby Union these days.

  • Eastsix

    The lack of self awareness in these people is hilarious. What they are effectively saying is;

    “We don’t want you people moving into our area, changing the character of it, and making it more expensive for locals to live here!”

    This is apparently fine and acceptable when shouted at trendy and /or reasonably well off types moving in, but not ok when people say it about immigrants. I’m not saying either should be acceptable, but I’m not sure there is any intellectual honesty in believing passionately in the former and berating people who believe the latter.

    • Mongo Part II

      I don’t see what’s so bad about gentrification. It turns slum sh!thole areas into reasonably pleasant places. I guess that makes me racist

      • Eastsix

        I lived in Hackney for a decade until 2009, and gentrification was most welcome. Everyone I know there (mostly born and bred in Hackney) is delighted the place is now a much nicer place to live.

        • Mongo Part II

          I bet your Marxist Hippo of an MP tried her best to block all gentrification of the area

      • red2black

        The poorer the community, the less say the people who who live there have in what goes on.

      • vieuxceps2

        i find that eveything makes me racist,especially reality.

    • vieuxceps2

      “The Plebs stood in the burning streets
      Whence all but they had fled….”

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        Hum the first verse and I’ll fake the rest.

        • vieuxceps2

          “I’ll fake the rest”-Don’t you always?

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            “Don’t you know there’s a crisis in Syria?”
            “Hum the first verse and I’ll fake the rest.”

            Kids today! What would you do with um?

          • Labour Mole Catcher

            Does the word “um” a code for “I am female genitalia”?!

  • Mongo Part II

    however ridiculous you may think an overpriced cereal cafe is, it’s depressing to think a couple of people put hard work into building up a small business only to have a bunch of idiotic thugs try to tear it down because it represents ‘capitalism’.

    Maybe those ‘hipsters’ should just jack in any aspirations to better themselves and join the Class War knuckle-draggers on the dole

    there were also apparently terrified children inside the cafe while it was being attacked. I suppose it’s OK to terrorise middle class children

    • freddiethegreat

      A simple answer would be to offer tasteless muesli as well. Difficult to barricade premises from the outside when you’re inside filling your worthless mouth.

    • Kin62

      You’re right. These guys built up a business, employing people and paying tax while they did it. Nobody is being made to buy their product.

  • Mongo Part II

    London’s always been a patchwork quilt – incredibly deprived areas nestle right next to some of the wealthiest in the country.

    but I’ve noticed these divisions have polarised and intensified even more over the past decade or so. London now mainly consists of incredibly wealthy enclaves surrounded by a sea of urban ethnic slums and Third World ghettoes. Meanwhile the white working/middle class have all but fled – to the outer suburbs or left London altogether. I don’t blame them

    The cultural Marxists will tell you this is ‘diversity’ and is healthy for a city. It isn’t diversity, it’s division and segregation

  • Sten vs Bren

    “Most working-class people find identity politics an anathema, perhaps because they have imbibed insufficient quantities of Marcuse and Gramsci and Habermas and are therefore not, in a Marxist sense, fully conscious. They are still asleep, these legions of the lumpenproletariat, unenlightened and averse. That, I suspect, would be Class War’s analysis”

    No, Class War are not Marxists. Why are you making out that they are?

    Oh; Corbyn. 🙂 Corbyn, Corbyn, Corbyn.

    • Sean L

      Because class war is Marxist by definition. Whether the people in question identify themselves as ‘Marxist’ is another matter. Where he’s wrong is in referring to the working class as ‘lumpenproletariat’, Marx’s term for the criminally inclined underclass.

      • red2black

        Class war waged in order to create a Workers State has nothing to do with Anarchism, and Marxism has no monopoly on how class war is defined.

        • Sean L

          No doubt you are right. Though I can’t see how any concept, or indeed any person, could have a monopoly on how *anything* is defined. Not even the OED would claim that. The point is to do with the origin of the concept. Marx was the first *theorist* of class war.

          • red2black

            I’d suggest he wasn’t the first, but the most influential; mainly because he had a ‘complete’ theory that basically replaced religious man with economic man at the centre of a historical world-view. Marx’s idea of class struggle was inspired by the idea of race struggle, as had been discussed by French historians. By the way, my only real interest in all this is in the history of the Anarchists in the Spanish Civil War.

          • vieuxceps2

            Call ’em all “marxoids” . I do.

          • Sean L

            I call them tw*ts mate.

  • beenzrgud

    Dipsticks like Class War don’t protest in real working class areas because they’d get a good kicking, in all senses of the word. I suspect they know this, as they also must know deep down that really they’re just full of sh*t.

    • red2black

      They protest in the former coal-mining Northern town where I live.

      • beenzrgud

        You’re probably mistaking working class with self entitled (non working) underclass. I know a lot of miners who were on the picket lines, and they couldn’t stand all the militant ‘socialist workers’ who were arriving by the coachload to lend a hand (sh*t stir). I’m from a council estate that was working class, now underclass, and no-one I know can stand them either. You’re entitled to your opinion, but so am I.

        • red2black

          The idea of an underclass is divisive, and has become economically, if not socially, acceptable. Working class people who are unemployed remain working class, even if they’ve never had a job. I agree with you that the vast majority of miners objected to outsiders poking their noses in on the picket lines, but I also know that miners families appreciated the money, food and other stuff that was donated when things were at their worst. Of course, there were a few exceptions like Dave Douglass; miner, author, and Class War affiliate.

          • beenzrgud

            Most of the miners I know got on with their lives and found other employment, South Yorkshire. I doubt many of those now protesting in places like Doncaster have ever even been down a coal mine, since most of those that were miners are now coming up for retirement. I disagree with your comment about those who’ve never had a job. When I was a youngster there were still those who thought the state should provide and did all they could to avoid work, I personally knew quite a few. There’s just a lot more of them nowadays, or so it seems in some areas. My working class friends made sure they got an education and made the best use of it, even if that meant moving to a different area or taking work abroad. There’s no excuse for not making the best of the educationall opportunities on offer, and then putting it to good use. Anyone can sit on their a*rse and complain about lack of opportunity, and plenty do exactly that.

          • red2black

            You’re right, and I wouldn’t defend anyone who milks the system. I’ve never been down a coal mine myself, but I’ve known miners in the past. I’m in my sixties and a product of the sixties – a time when work was plentiful and jobs were far more secure. Young people live in a very different world these days, and they will have their own battles to fight.

  • Lauren Mayhew

    Rod Liddle is a real treat.. Always gets it right

  • sandy winder

    Corbyn and Co seem more interested in promoting violent activism than actually governing the country. Hence all the left wing mobs protesting about class, capitalism and austerity etc. No doubt he will be encouraging the yobs to fight for pacifism next.

  • Liberanos

    The lack of protest about Redcar is strange, bearing in mind the importance of ‘The Man of Steel’ in the hagiography of the far left.

    • red2black

      Hundreds of people will be out of work with little chance of being re-employed.

    • Mongo Part II

      The Class War types want to see as many people out of work as possible so they feel better about themselves and can then moan about austerity. protesting about Redcar wouldn’t fit in with that mindset

  • I unlock my Browning

    The mark-up on a bowl of cereal at four quid is a lot less than the mark-up on a single whisky in the pub, or the mark-up on a 2p tea bag in a tea shop.
    So let’s attack and close down all the pubs and tea shops, shall we?

    • jonkle

      Had it been a chippy selling spuds fried in fat with curry sauce at a 3000% markup, they would have been quite happy.

      • red2black

        You boys think it’s all about money. It isn’t.

        • Mongo Part II

          yes it is – it’s the politics of envy. They can’t bear to see people with more than them.

          What else are they protesting about?

          • red2black

            It’s the politics of anger.

          • Mongo Part II

            they’re angry because a couple of enterprising guys tried to better themselves by opening up a cereal cafe? They’re angry because a run-down area is becoming a little more plesant?

            is that seriously where anger should be directed?

          • red2black

            I don’t agree with attacking businesses or whatever else, but to protest against developments that are marginalising and driving out local people seems fair enough to me. Class War protest about gentrification, while others object to immigration in such places.

          • jonkle

            In what way does a cafe selling bowls of cereal drive out local people ?

          • red2black

            On its own, I’m sure it doesn’t.

          • jonkle

            They were carrying out a lawful business, did they deserve to get their premises trashed ?

          • red2black

            Certainly not. I know there was damage done, but I don’t think the place was trashed.

          • Frank Marker

            Really? Not really sure I see this lot as Robin Hood figures to be honest. They are just odious people who need something to get into a ruck about. What Class War don’t understand is that this country has always disliked extremists of any kind and three cheers for that too.

          • red2black

            I wouldn’t describe them as Robin Hood figures either; far from it.
            Britain has a tradition of offering a safe haven to people that a majority of people consider extremist: Karl Marx for example.
            I recently read a book by a militant anarchist who’d fought in the Durruti Column and the Iron Column during the Spanish Civil War who was allowed to spend the rest of his life here.

          • Frank Marker

            I agree. Garibaldi was seen as a pin up boy by Victorian England and with all Victorian heroes his image was immortalised in Staffordshire pottery figures. Not sure how true this is but apparently Notts Forest adopted their red shirts in honour of his patriots.

          • red2black

            They were all biscuit-fired as well. (tee hee)

          • Frank Marker

            Kindly leave the stage sir.

      • MikeF

        I once visited a factory making that archetypal proletarian food – baked beans. Now there is a rip-off. They start off as tiny dry pips that are put in a can with nothing more than water and a dash of tomato sauce after which the can is sealed and heated before a label is applied. That’s it – cost of raw ingredients next to nothing. If only Class War knew that – they might start attacking ‘greasy spoons’ selling beans on toast.

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      Is it true that Morrison’s are retailing own-brand 12-year, 70cl single-malt which is identical to Bowmore Islay, for some Stg.20.00? Only slightly more than the branded product here in sunny Japan. Some Asda and Tesco own brand products occassionaly show up in supermarkets here, so we could be looking at a bargain. Face it retailing’s a racket only possible because the mug-punter public need to be soft-soaped before they’re shaved. Nothing is bought, everything has to be sold.
      Jack, the Japan Alps Brit

      • Labour Mole Catcher

        Whisky and antipsychotic medications (for your schizophrenia) do not mix, you know that!

  • Silas_Tomkyn_Comberbache

    Muswell Hell is full of bankers now pal.

  • whistler80

    Why is it “repellant” for a cafe to sell cornflakes at £4 a bowl when every cafe in London sells coffee or toast or any other similar ‘breakfast’ fare at the same price. The £4 is not for the cornflakes, it’s for the table space, the service, etc etc.
    In fact £4 is cheap if that person sits at the table for half an hour or more, I’m surprised they can make any money at all.

    • Sean L

      Yeah as if Rod wouldn’t pay at least that for his aperitif to say nothing of his hors d’oeuvres et entrees…

      • whistler80

        quite right!

    • Vera

      Setting up a café selling cereals at a time when food science has done another U-turn. Carbs and sugar now bad, cause obesity. Protein and fat good. Not too clever of them.

      • whistler80

        jeez, I bet you’re fun at parties

        • Vera

          Never did like small talk.

  • Sean L

    ‘Gentrified’ is now a racially loaded euphemism. Brick Lane in particular is noted for its curry houses. No doubt the Weetabix mark up far exceeds that of the poppadom and spinach bhajee…

    • Mongo Part II

      everything is racially loaded now, it’s getting ridiculous. The word ‘immigration’ has become practically taboo – just utter it and it’s assumed you’re racist, doesn’t matter the context.

      • freddiethegreat

        “Immigration”

  • Daniel Jeyn

    Wow, this is brilliant writing. And I’m a Yank, watching the asinine pantomime parade that is our current endless election cycle. The same observations would ring true here as well, point-for-point, of our urbane, hipster, bien-pensant, over-educated/under-calloused “Class Warriors.”

    • freddiethegreat

      You think you have problems? We’ve got an animated chocolate peanut that think’s it’s a president.

  • Jaysus. I still have a slight callous from the day when I decided (yes, stupid waste of time) to cut back the crape myrtles on our property (don’t ask: it’s a cultural thing). The smart American realizes that I’m an English gardener and am not overly impressed by his landscape-janitorial techniques. I can do it myself with the best of them, but don’t always want the horny hand. (Why is it that when I talk about gardens I end up sounding vaguely blue-magazine?)

  • Jay Igaboo

    Thank you, Class War, for providing THIS “horny-handed son of toil” for the justification for using the phrase ” What a bunch of complete and utter middle clarse libtarded wankers.”
    There can be no other description.
    I had considered describing them as comfortable , privileged, unctuous zealots with lives to empty and purposeless that they have to seek umbrage on behalf of others in order to believe in their right to exist, but as the plumb the Marianas Trench of wankerism, the above will do.

  • MathMan

    Why are servants always ‘little’ men or women? Is it genetic?

    • blandings

      Malnutrition

    • red2black

      Like Lurch in the Addams Family?

    • I didn’t know that they were. Most households preferred very tall girls because they could do more work without a step ladder.

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    I just don’t get it. A restraunt providing a cheap breakfast is at arget for Class War? What a bunch of nutters. Did the Dorchester’s buffet slip by them?

    • red2black

      None of them are up that early.

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    “I had to stay at home to supervise our gardener”
    I told him to paint the porch, but the idiot painted the car.

  • David Mustard

    good article..,partly explains the rise of UKIP..,i don’t support them but getting 4 million votes and then only one MP kinda stinks..,

  • Sue Smith

    Class War is soooo last century. Oh, wait. The one before that.

    • red2black

      1832?

      • Sue Smith

        Well, think Dickens.

        • red2black

          I’ve only read ‘Oliver Twist’, which was great, and a couple of chapters of ‘Hard Times’, which was dreadful. Unless you mean Monica?

          • Sue Smith

            Pip in “Great Expectations” – wanting to be a “gentleman” but absolutely aware and humiliated by his class. Then there’s Trabb’s Boy, at the tailor shop, where Pip goes to get his ‘gentleman’s outfit’. Trabb’s Boy hits the walls the the shop with his broom, “signalling, as I understood it, equality with any blacksmith alive or dead”! Priceless.

          • red2black

            Sorry, I’m not sure what you’re saying. I know Dickens was a reformer; not a revolutionary.

          • Sue Smith

            I was a bit obtuse. Dickens wrote about class envy and the things people will do as a consequence of that. Class permeates all his novels. Well it would; it was about England. But his characters were often nasty and embittered (with some exceptions, notably Joe Gargery from GE) as a consequence of the class to which they belonged. The satirical riff in GE about Trabb’s Boy (notice the capital letters on ‘boy’) was precisely about that. He also showed how appallingly privileged people could behave (Bentley Drummel in GE, for example).

          • red2black

            Well, I’m from a working class background and educated to degree level. I mixed with middle and upper class people during my working life, but I’m still working class. I’m sure that’s how they saw me as well – probably due to me having kept a strong regional accent, tha’ knows.

          • Sue Smith

            I don’t discriminate between classes myself; I take each person as I find them. But I loathe class warfare because of its strong strain of hate and envy. Those are such wasted emotions. My late father used to say the social morality goes vertically through all the classes and not just horizontally through one. There’s snobbishness from the upper middle class and elites, and these latter are to be found in the law and academe and they think they are a cut above everybody else – which is, itself, another version of class warfare IMO.

            My attitude is “be the best person you can be, and with dignity”.

  • WhiteVanMan

    Miners strike, you mean their own countrymen, who were breaking the law, blocking the Queens highway, so working miners couldn’t get in the entrance

  • TrulyDisqusted

    Why is £4 for a bowl of cereal served at a table with cutlery and proper bowl considered extravagant by people who probably pay just as much for coffee to go served in a cardboard cup?

  • edlancey

    Excellent article. The Left vs. Right debate has been replaced by Nationalism vs. Globalisation – and the lefties are stuck.

    All their multicultural pieties demand they hate nationalism and support globalisation but they can’t be nationalists since they hate their own fashist, raycist culture and they’re too skint to avoid living “up west” so are stuck with the knife-wielding dregs of the Third Underworld.

    If it wasn’t so pathetic it would be hilarious.

    • red2black

      Globalisation seems to be a Left / Right issue on its own (?)

      • edlancey

        the old left want it because they hate their own cultures then whine about it when it happens.

        Anyway these clods aren’t really the “left” – they are just jealous. Their only problem with the housing crisis is that they never managed to grab themselves a bargain.

        • red2black

          If you mean the sale of council houses to tenants, which had something around an 80% take-up, I’m sure there must have been a few of the Old Left somewhere in the mix who’d ‘sold out’, at least as far as everyone else was concerned.

          • edlancey

            No I don’t.

          • red2black

            ‘they never managed to grab themselves a bargain’?

          • edlancey

            “If you mean the sale of council houses to tenants”

            I didn’t mean that and the sale of council houses had/has nothing to do with what is universally recognised as the “housing crisis” of 2007/2008.

            It’s like speaking to a ‘kin brick wall.

          • red2black

            Thanks for explaining. I understand now.
            Sorry if I annoyed you.

  • Cobbett

    I hate ‘Hipsters’.

  • Lisa McKenzie is on record arguing precisely the opposite of the view that Rod attributes to her as ‘current star’ of Class War:

    In an article published in The Guardian (16th Sept 2015) entitled ‘The refugee crisis will hit the UK’s working class areas hardest’, McKenzie argues that the ‘liberal left’ consensus in favour of taking refugees ignores the damaging effect on working class areas.

    The article concludes with:

    “While the wealthy and the powerful make grand gestures of buying islands and giving homes, and the liberal left offer their spare rooms, in reality it will be the working-class people of Britain who will share the little they have.”

    It’s a real shame that Rod couldn’t be bothered to read this article before writing his own. Or maybe he did, but decided to plough on with Plan A anyway.

  • boiledcabbage

    I envisage a whole shop selling Class War merchandise @£4.50 a pop, who would like to co-invest with me? The sales to tourists attracted to the Dickensian slums of Hoxton will be tremendous. Forget copyright and all that nonsense, they are not trading, and they can’t afford lawyers and anyway the phrase is out of Marx or Engels. Stuff all made in China by hand with real bloodstains etc. Who is in ?

    • Frank Marker

      Like it! How about we re-enact, in the manner of the Sealed Knot Society, classic Class War Vs Cops rucks? I would just love to do the great Cereal Cafe siege of 2015.

      • boiledcabbage

        Just think of the £££. “Fuck London’….what a phrase! Mugs T-shirts, knickers, tea towels – the lot!. Sold by the Original Class War Shop.

        • Frank Marker

          Loving your creative genius. I’m thinking Ian Bone toby jugs here. I know this is stretching it a bit but do Class War have anyone attractive we could use as poster boys and girls? Is there an equivalent of a Cara Delevingne or a David Gandy we could employ? I know Ian Bone is CW’s sort of head but he’s hardly attractive enough to sex up their image is he?

          • boiledcabbage

            He is ideal. Just photoshop him in some black pvc and fishnets and jobs done!

          • Frank Marker

            In the words of Colonel Kurtz, “The horror… The horror…The horror’…

        • Frank Marker

          Ian Bone talking dolls? “Middle class scum!…F*ck off!… F*ck the Pigs!.. Five more years of this f*cking government!…and my personal favourites “I need feeding” and “I need changing. I have wet my underpants”.

        • Jackthesmilingblack

          Bugger doubling.
          Bugger London, too.
          The old ones are the best.

  • Feminister

    “Their next protest, for example, is against the Jack the Ripper museum in London, on the grounds that it glorifies violence against women — which is a bit like saying that Auschwitz glorifies anti-Semitism.”

    Well a bit like saying it in the sense that Auschwitz isn’t called the Mengele museum and doesn’t sell comedy souvenirs.

  • Davedeparis

    Great piece. Ironically the patrons of Cereal Cafe would, if asked, most probably agree with almost everything “Class War” has to say. The radical left has intellectually collapsed and now has retreated into a sort of more extreme (and thus holier) than thou competition and is thus busy eating its own.

  • Augustus

    Thankfully never heard of these ‘very stupid and irrelevant’ people before, but I suppose there’s some truth in the article. But I would say that not all gardeners are quite the ‘servants’ you describe. We also have a ‘surly’ individual to do our garden, but he’s self-employed and makes quite a nice income from his stream of customers. He’s just returned from a three-week holiday in Florida which probably cost much more than quite a few of his customers could afford. So, good for him, and all the other working people who keep our homes and gardens neat and tidy.

    • Sean L

      it’s irony mate.

  • Solage 1386

    Whenever I see one of these Hipster beards, I reach for an imaginary flame-thrower……

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    If that sort of violent protest had taken place in Tokyo, Japanese police would have been down on it like a ton of bricks. Literally hundreds of uniformed officers, arresting protesters, throwing in the “Black Mariah” en route for a fine and or slammer time, plus a criminal record which would preclude many types of paid employment .
    Face it Britisher pals, you’ve got a failed police force (service) on your hands.

  • Sue Smith

    This guy can be a lefty idiot, but sometimes he gets it JUST RIGHT:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dmd48kLanao

  • Richard

    If the cereal restaurant had been owned by people other than white, there would have been no protest. If the middle class liberal elite were other than white, there would be no protest. Indigenous people in the UK are too brainwashed to survive. This is actually simply a manifestation of that.

  • Roger Hudson

    Two men with beards standing in front of a wall of factory made sugar, OMG.
    Everyone knows that porridge is the only way to eat well ( add a banana, perhaps a little honey).
    Everyone knows that beards are ‘dubious’,and why ( or have people seen too many ‘brazilians’.).

  • Cornelius Bonkers

    I fear also that modern bien-pensant Conservatism will be no answer for the discarded and abused white working class; they’re done-for, dying-out and soon will be small rump. Furthermore, UKIP is no answer in the face of Conservative wealth.

  • Minstrel Boy

    Lots of Class War warriors, crusties, fellow crusty-punks, and anarchist New Age bin-diving travellers are actually quite posh. Even that Rees-Mogg fellow recently claimed to have been one, at least in spirit anyway.
    It is a great way to see the world and annoy Mummy and Daddy, while always having the bail-out-of-bother card in reserve.
    I wish I could afford to be an anarcho-punk, tree hugging traveller. I’d be right good at it, but probably not so hot at the begging. Unfortunately, I have a lot of big bills to pay. So it is back to slogging on as a wage slave. There’s got to be a better way, without eating Sainsbury’s skipped left-overs.
    Depressing, this anomie-alienation malarkey. Think I’ll get sozzled to comfort myself.

  • Linda Smith

    Odd you’re on the same rag as Alex Massie, Rod. I wonder if Frazer’s read this article. Does the left hand know what the right hand’s doing?

  • Linda Smith

    Odd you’re on the same rag as Alex Massie, Rod. I wonder if Frazer’s read this article. Does the left hand know what the right hand’s doing?

  • Neil Saunders

    ISIL, or whatever they’re called this minute, hate some of the right people, too.

    However, this doesn’t endear them to me.

    As any six-year-old child in a primary school playground can tell you, the enemy of your enemy is not necessarily your friend.

  • Thomas

    I agree with plenty of this but I don’t really think it’s good or right for pretend lefties to hate the one middle class hipster that realized their friends and people like them would pay £4 for a cereal bowlful and exploit that.

    Gentrification, in the way class war uses it, is just more faux-left memespeak aimed at attacking anyone who has money. This place isn’t exploiting anyone except people stupid enough to pay the idiotic mark-up. But no exploitation has taken place here, one overtly hipster cereal parlour is the target of hatred of middle-class hipsters because it is attracting middle-class hipsters to the area.

    Bien-pensants and their irrational oikophobia and oblivious self-hatred is amusing but not something you should be praising them for. Even if hipsters are insufferable cunts and the restaurant owners worse, and the area has been infested moneyed hipsters, so what? I suppose these leftists would prefer a pound shop or an aldi or some other big brand name? We need poor shops for the poor, after all. We can’t force our hipster culture onto them, we must protect them. Introducing money into a poor area can only possibly be a bad thing.

    It’s really important to note that selling cereal at extortionate prices only works and property prices are rising and all the either supposed ‘evils of gentrification’ are because London is getting richer, in some form or another- money is moving to London. The distribution of the movement is clearly off. But hate hipsters because it’s the common sense thing, hate the incidental unfairness of money movement and wish to rectify it, don’t encourage hating someone who took advantage of a market because of their associations with things you don’t really like. That’s what the faux-lefties do. Them because Cereal Killer are part of the evil forces of gentrification, Liddle because they’re probably insufferable hipsters.

  • C. Sipe

    Class War want to be careful with a cry to arms of ‘Fuck London!’ … they might get some nasty disease if they follow through on it.

  • Kin62

    Rod for PM!

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