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Lead book review

Shakespeare's London: where all the world really was a stage

1606 was not only the year of Lear, Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra, but of plague, witchcraft and explosive politics, all vividly captured in James Shapiro’s latest tour de force

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

1606: Shakespeare and the Year of Lear James Shapiro

Faber, pp.423, £20, ISBN: 9780571235780

We don’t usually pay all that much attention, as James Shapiro points out, to the Jacobean Shakespeare. We’re in the habit of thinking of him as an Elizabethan playwright: look in most cradle-to-grave biographies for ‘what Shakespeare was doing after James came to the throne in 1603 and there usually aren’t many pages left to read’.

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