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Books

Sebastian Faulks returns to the psychiatrist’s chair in Where My Heart Used to Beat

Fans of Faulks will welcome the ambitious scope of his latest novel on the effects of war — but the aim is more admirable than the execution

12 September 2015

9:00 AM

12 September 2015

9:00 AM

Where My Heart Used To Beat Sebastian Faulks

Hutchinson, pp.325, £20, ISBN: 9780091936839

There can hardly be two novelists less alike than Sebastian Faulks and Will Self, in style and in content. Faulks writes in the grand tradition of realist fiction: a list of his themes might include the brutality and waste of war, France and, of course, romantic love. Self, meanwhile, has created dystopias in which to satirise different aspects of humanity, while conjuring with all manner of stylistic invention.

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