The Spectator's Notes

Charles Moore’s Notes: what the Labour party needs is a parliamentary representation committee

19 September 2015

8:00 AM

19 September 2015

8:00 AM

When the Labour party began, its purpose was the representation of labour (i.e. workers) in the House of Commons. Indeed, its name was the Labour Representation Committee. Its goal was gradually achieved, and then, from the 1980s, gradually annihilated. With the victory of Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour leader is supported by only 10 per cent of the party’s MPs, and yet it is imagined, at least by his backers, that he will eventually be able to get into government with them. It is an impossible situation. What is needed today is the opposite of how it all started — a Parliamentary Representation Committee in the Labour party.

When the history of Corbynism comes to be written, many will assume that his form of leftism arose as a protest against the Thatcher era. This is not so. It predated her. There really was a belief in the 1970s that capitalism would ‘collapse under the weight of its own contradictions’. The formative experience of the Corbyn generation was not Thatcher but the crisis of 1976, when a Labour government was forced to bring in the IMF. It was then that the campaigns against ‘the cuts’, which have been going on ever since — and the hard-left infiltration connected with them — really took off. (Indeed the Jim Callaghan/Denis Healey cuts were much more severe than any imposed by Mrs Thatcher.) The left, supported, in some cases, by the Soviet Union, thought revolution was nigh. When the revolutionary turned out to be Mrs Thatcher, they half-admired her — or at least hated her only in a bogey-woman sort of way. The bitterest disputes are internecine, so the figures of true loathing were Callaghan, or Roy Jenkins, or right-wing trade unionists, who had cheated them, they thought, of power. The emotional appeal of Mr Corbyn in the left today is that he is the apostolic successor of the man they wanted most — the late Tony Benn.


Mr Corbyn’s hobby is manhole covers, on which he is an expert. I was about thoughtlessly to mock this leisure activity when I was prevented by the learned Christopher Howse. He speaks as a connoisseur of a distinct, but related genre — coal plates, which cover coalholes, and are often neglected. In the 19th century, a man called Shephard Taylor sketched 150 coal plates, and these were published as a book called Opercula: London Coal Plates, in 1929. Christopher has now photographed 1,019 coal plates on his mobile phone and tweeted them (#opercula). Despite his preference for coal plates, Christopher is generous about students of manhole covers or (with which they must not be confused) drain covers. ‘Such interest,’ he says, ‘is fundamentally conservative’, so there ‘may be hope for Mr Corbyn’. I wonder if Mr Corbyn would like the manhole covers commissioned by my friend Greville Howard (Lord Howard of Rising) for his village in Norfolk. All of them bear his coat of arms. Probably Mr Corbyn would prefer to impose new ‘people’s’ manholes. In fact, I wonder if he is happy with the word ‘manhole’, which lacks gender neutrality.

Perhaps Mr Corbyn’s Labour detractors in Parliament will learn a touch of Australian brutality. This week a coup among the Liberals turned out the prime minister Tony Abbott and put in Malcolm Turnbull (who had himself been similarly thrown out of the leadership in 2009). I feel conflicted by this. Mr Turnbull is a bit of a green nut, and an anti-monarchist, but I have fond memories of him (see also Notes, 3 October 2009). Returning to the editor’s office at The Spectator one dark afternoon in 1984, I found Mr Turnbull, whom I didn’t know, sitting on my sofa with a proprietorial air. He told me that his boss, Kerry Packer, would buy the magazine the next week, a fact which the then proprietor, Algy Cluff, had somehow failed to mention. ‘Why does Mr Packer want it?’ I asked forlornly. ‘Well,’ said Turnbull, ‘Kerry’s not only motivated by greed.’ Then he paused, clearly thinking he had done his boss an injustice, and added, ‘Well, not all the time anyway.’ Luckily, Mr Packer was embroiled in a scandal that very week and the deal did not go through. The next time I heard of Turnbull, a couple of years later, he was trying not to buy The Spectator but to sell it. Rupert Murdoch rang me up and told me he had been offered it by Turnbull when the owners, Fairfax, were wanting to sell. I was a bit confused about what standing Turnbull had in the matter, but that sale, too, did not happen. Then, in the 21st century, I met Malcolm once more, and his charming wife Lucy, and took them out to dinner. I found him brilliant and delightful. I suppose he could now buy The Spectator with Australian taxpayers’ money, but I don’t think it is for sale.

It was politic that the Queen celebrated her record-breaking reign by getting on the reopened Borders Railway, doing her bit for the future of her kingdom. She got off at Tweedbank. The reinvention of this line should help the nearby wonder of Abbotsford, the house that Sir Walter Scott built (or rather, rebuilt and magnified). It is an inspiring place, especially for anyone who tries to live by the pen. As a poet and a novelist, Scott was a global phenomenon, and his house became a place of pilgrimage in his own lifetime. Despite his appalling debts (paid off honourably and industriously), he was able to construct an edifice out of his own romantic imagination and practical inclinations, where every interesting person came and every curiosity accumulated. The place is comically grand, and yet also the true home of a great writer — more interesting than the English equivalents such as Kipling’s Bateman’s. When we first visited years ago, it was sadly run-down. We went back this summer and found it marvellously restored by a grant from Scottish Heritage. But it struggles for enough visitors because the cult of Scott has long since waned. If only his ability to revive Scottish pride in British form could be rediscovered, a great many problems would go away.

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Show comments
  • Tom

    Does he need a cup of tea? Does he always ramble on like this?

    • Sausage McMuffin

      Dear Charles isn’t even very old – he’s only 58.

    • Tamerlane

      No, he’s just much more intelligent than you.

  • PeteTongue

    Turnbull, totally ignored by the British right. Why?

  • rtj1211

    Perhaps if you want to help save the Union you get someone to have a quiet word with Archie Norman about why the Rugby World Cup propaganda is that England and only England are going to win it. Particularly after last night’s fairly inept display.

    You want the Welsh, the Scots and the Northern Irish to remain in the Union, then coverage slightly less nationalistic an jingoistic would be appropriate………and there had better not be any match fixing for England, because if there is, I want the RFU all in internment camps, all the money from the World Cup spent anywhere but England and all the England squad on minimum wage jobs until they are 50 for being organised criminals whilst spouting bullshit about ‘heroes’, ‘spreading the game’ etc etc.

    The problem with you right wingers is that you spout Unionism but act like English master race apartheid supporters, crushing the Celts in perpetuity whilst telling them how dependent they are on lovely old England. Well, the Scots want the 4th verse of the National Anthem discussed (and why not?), the Northern Irish play rugby with the Republic and the Welsh feel deep down what the Scots feel but express it rather more subtly and less obnoxiously…..

    My view on rugby is that it would be very healthy if a team like Ireland, Wales, Argentina or France won the world cup, it would be very healthy if rugby took the tournament to South America for the first time and it would be very healthy if the DT, the Daily Mail and several other media outlets were not acting like the whole tournament is a fixed farce.

    England wearing red shirts last night was very suggestive of fixing scenarios being challenged by Warren Gatland…….

    • Johnny Foreigner

      I made the mistake of reading your post before breakfast, now I have a headache. When you push your trolley around Asda today, keep repeating to yourself, there is no perfect dynamic, not everything in life is fair and contradictions there are many.
      There now, as you buy your Heinz soups, that are, buy one get one free, you won’t have to stand there, wondering why that is. Your free.

    • Captain Dryland

      I think you will find that match-fixing always works such that the team to which the match-fixing players belong loses or is disadvantaged. A match-fixing player easily gives away points against his own side, by giving away penalties, failing to run a try, bowling wide, and so on. It is far more difficult to arrange to score points for your own side, without collaboration of crooks in the opposing team. If there is any England match-fixing, it will enhance Scotland’s chances.

    • Tamerlane

      I think Japan should win and then you can stick some sushi where the sun don’t shine.

    • Peter Stroud

      The Celts are certainly not dependent on old England, but they wouldn’t get far without good old English tax payers money.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Well, as that excludes you, what are you moaning about?

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      And they accuse me of off-topic blogging.

      • jjjj

        With justification.

  • Precambrian

    Nobody needs two Tory parties.

    • Jingleballix

      Britain doesn’t even have ONE at the moment.

  • pobjoy

    There really was a belief in the 1970s that capitalism would ‘collapse under the weight of its own contradictions’.

    There is still that belief. There are none who do not believe it possible, and there are very sensible people who think it is not far off. If it is, Corbyn nationalising the railway, supported by 62% of the nation, is not going to make much difference, is it. What are you afraid of, Moore? Losing a bit of pelf?

    The aims of the Methodist Hardie are no less relevant to people queuing for food to feed starving children today* than they were for parents who could not afford coal to save their children from hypothermia in 1906. If capitalism is so wonderful, Moore, explain how that is, without putting the blame on the children.

    Moore says he believes that a nonce in a black frock can turn bread into God, so that fat slobs can remain fat slobs. So don’t expect anything but slobs’ nonsense from him.

    * http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/apr/22/food-bank-users-uk-low-paid-workers-poverty

    • Tamerlane

      Jiminy Cricket it’s 1954!

      • pobjoy

        ‘Dr John Middleton, the vice-president of the Faculty of Public Health, said: “Poverty is already creating massive health issues for people today, and if we do not tackle the root causes of food poverty now, we will see it affecting future generations too.”’

        • Observer1951

          The major health issue by far in the UK is diabetes, type2, caused by life style and poor diet. The poor diet is not caused by poverty it’s caused by the overconsumption of processed foods. It’s cheaper to eat good healthy fresh food but you do have to cook it and not just microwave it.

          • pobjoy

            The major health issue by far in the UK is diabetes, type2, caused by life style and poor diet.

            At present. Are you blind, or just one more who deserves to die?

          • Observer1951

            No not blind, just a scientist who’s worked for years discovering drugs and the causes of disease. I take my judgement and knowledge over yours, thanks.

          • pobjoy

            A scientist does not assume that another person is not a peer. But let’s suppose that you write the truth about yourself.

            What drug will raise a starved corpse to life?

          • Observer1951

            If that’s the level of discussion you’re capable of forget it. Drug raising a corpse… Pathetic. You clearly don’t have the scientific background needed to engage with. When you know something about genomics, pharmacokinetics, DDIs, SNPs or dare I say CRESPR get back to me.

          • pobjoy

            You clearly don’t have the scientific background needed to engage with.

            I see. So this poster has indeed got a potion to raise the dead. Perhaps he will pass on the details to those with the required ‘background’.

            http://www.fph.org.uk/officers

          • Observer1951

            So what’s your point? You produce a poster showing some academics related to public health? I repeat do you understand any of the acronyms I posted? What’s your level of scientific training specifically within the health and pharmaceutical sector

          • pobjoy

            You are in a state of dementia.

          • Observer1951

            Ouch that’s a stinging reply. I have actually published on Alzheimers as I have worked on so called central nervous system drugs. I’m happy I don’t have dementia yet, you however do exhibit some interesting responses. Still struggling to understand those acronyms aren’t you?

          • mike53

            I think he ( Observer 1951 ) has made you look rather foolish my friend.

          • pobjoy

            If you are telling the truth about being ‘my friend’, is that reason to suppose that you ever tell the truth?

          • Jingleballix

            ‘Poverty’ causes starvation and illnesses of deprivation……..there is no ‘poverty’ in Britain.

          • pobjoy

            You’re doing well, Jingleballix. You’ve learned to read and write, fixed up broadband, and got yourself a really apt nick.

          • Jingleballix

            Get a proper job and a mortgage, learn something about life, cut the smart-arse comments……and one day, you may eventually become a worthwhile poster.

          • pobjoy

            learn something about life

            From someone who wrote that there is no poverty in Britain?

            Phone the clinic, first thing.

          • Jingleballix

            If there is ‘poverty’ in Britain……..how come all these economic migrants want to live here?

          • pobjoy

            ‘Dr John Middleton, the vice-president of the Faculty of Public Health, said: “Poverty is already creating massive health issues for people today, and if we do not tackle the root causes of food poverty now, we will see it affecting future generations too.”’

            Is Dr John Middleton, Vice-President of the Faculty of Public Health, a ‘leftie’? Or does he just need to cut the smart-arse comments? Do the >3 000 professional members of the FPH need to get a proper jobs and mortgages, and learn something about life?

          • Jingleballix

            You STILL need to cut out the smart-arse comments……..and ANSWER my question…………no matter a Common Purpose ‘stats machine’ might say, there is little material poverty in UK.

          • pobjoy

            Is Dr John Middleton, Vice-President of the Faculty of Public Health, a ‘leftie’? Or does he just need to cut out the smart-arse comments? Do the >3 000 professional members of the FPH need to get a proper jobs and mortgages, and learn something about life?

        • Tamerlane

          Cripes. Was he the one who also said the world is flat? I guess it must be if he says so. He’s got no public funding dog in the fight.

          • pobjoy

            Was he the one who also said the world is flat?

            Tamerlane? He was the one who reduced the world’s population by 5%. Sounds as if you’re offering to make a small contribution of your own to further that project.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            So you think the world is flat…sad.

          • Tamerlane

            Yadda yadda yadda…

          • Leon Wolfeson

            And you still think it’s flat, right.

    • Terry Field

      ”There really was a belief in the 1970s that capitalism would ‘collapse under the weight of its own contradictions’.”
      Well there are a very large number of unintelligent, foolish and ill-educated people in the world, so the idiots will have to believe something, will they not???
      Healey was sufficient of an idiot to continue expansionist State spending without reserves and with horrific trade figures. Rational capitalist markets then told the Beach-master to get on his bike!!!!!!
      And Capital allocation by free markets beats soviet dirigiste crap anyway of the week, Little Lenin! It is not perfect, but it is butter than a State Committee of Corbyn clones deciding on who gets to spend what.

      • pobjoy

        Why is it idiotic to suppose that capitalism will collapse? The Roman Empire believed it was eternal. The European medievals believed exactly the same of their feudalism.

        • Jack Rocks

          You didn’t think about it very hard did you.

          • pobjoy

            Mummy doesn’t like you playing with her computer.

          • jjjj

            Why does almost every debate have to end up with childish comments? The ‘mummy and computer’ and/or ‘basement’ variant should be consigned to history.

          • pobjoy

            Why does almost every debate have to end up with childish comments?

            Because people go through years of ‘schooling’, learning to read, write, use a calculator and text a message, and little besides. So when these children meet something that they don’t like, they write something like:

            ‘You didn’t think about it very hard did you.’

            And other children vote for that. They can’t explain what they mean, because they don’t have the resources to go that far. They know what they like, and what they don’t like. Their hormones are working, but their cerebral hemispheres lie fallow, have never been developed. They spend more mental energy thinking up a ‘clever’ nick than they ever will in writing posts to go under them. They think they are adults, they are told they are adults, but in fact they are children. Thank Thatcher/Blairism for that.

          • jjjj

            Then you can also thank Atlee, Churchill, Wilson, Heath and Callaghan because otherwise there wouldn’t have been many voters for Thatcher nor Blair.

          • pobjoy

            The people who make voters are people who go into bedrooms and get themselve comfy. It is those people who produce those who continue to add value to the raw materials of the planet. Governments since the rise of capitalism have taken an interest in education, because by that means, more of that value is added. Thatcher and Blair reversed that profitable process, and the dire results are increasingly evinced on the internet.

        • Terry Field

          Oh. capitalism will of course change and be replaced as time passes. we cannot know what will come, as the future is always veiled and our comprehension, as the absurdities of ‘Marxism’ clearly show, remains primitive and almost entirely erroneous.
          The desire, however, to see capitalism go for emotional reasons, usually expressed by more-or-less economic or social failures or people whose lives are, as the French would say, ‘marginal’, is nothing more than a wish. There is a present difficulty for the old first world – their populations are experiencing the partial transfer of capital to other places where vast hordes of competitor workers- all brighter on average than us Caucasians – are starting to strip our advantages away.
          At present I see capitalism vital and unassailable as it acts to raise up new regions -and possibly buries ours.
          This was anticipated by economists as early as 1905, when the distortions of empires and protected trade routes were noted by these observers for their fragility.
          The global neural network of the internet has propelled competition in less than twenty five years, and our comfortable life is at an end.
          The worst threat however, is not from economic eclipse but from barbaric belief systems the west seems so unwilling to remove that it seems our civilisation is about to go the way of the Latin order in the fourth century.
          Finanlly, what fun to see the British trade unions railing against global capitla movement and labour competition – how very ‘internationale’ of them!
          Many of the Celtic barbarians north of the wode-line and west of Hereford may like this.
          As Walpoe said ‘they are ringing their bells now, in a few months they will be wringing their hands’

          • pobjoy

            the idiots will have to believe something, will they not???

            capitalism will of course change and be replaced

            T’internet. Innit wunnerful?

      • MickC

        But we don’t have free markets, or competition, that is the problem. There is no competition in the energy market, or on the railway. That is why Corbyn’s ideas on these aren’t bonkers. If we are to have corporatism, why not have it owned by the UK state?

        Also NATO is now just a US vassal rather than a defence pact. Trident cannot be used wothout the consent of thd US, and there are no circumstances where that would be given.

        What is wrong with a National Investment Bank, if corporatism is our economic choice?

    • Jules Wright

      That belief only resides in the minds of those that do not understand human nature. Capitalism is the very definition of the human condition, imperfect as we – and it – are. And even if capitalism as we know it does collapse, humanity will simply re-invent it. As long as one person has fur and the other has food, trade for mutual benefit will always survive. All the other alternatives have, funnily enough, failed every time.

      • pobjoy

        Capitalism is the very definition of the human condition

        Humanity has existed for perhaps a million years; capitalism, since the Industrial Revolution. On balance, non-capitalism seems more likely.

        even if capitalism as we know it does collapse

        So it’s not correct to say that it is ‘idiotic’ to suppose a collapse even an impossibility.

        humanity will simply re-invent it.

        Capitalism was not invented. It arose out of a particular combination of circumstances that may never recur; and it was not thought to be inevitable when incipient.

        • Jules Wright

          What a load of total bollocks. In other important news, Japan beat South Africa in the group stages. pobjoy: the very first barter deal was capitalistic. Set a trend y’know? Get back to CiF: you are an intellectual mong. Seriously. Utter cretin. Bye.

          • pobjoy

            the very first barter deal was capitalistic

            ‘For the capitalist mode of production to emerge as a distinctive mode of production dominating the whole production process of society, many different social, economic, cultural, technical and legal-political conditions had to come together.

            For most of human history, these did not come together.
            Capital existed, commercial trade existed, but it did not lead to industrialisation and large-scale capitalist industry. That required a whole series of new conditions, namely specific technologies of mass production, the ability to independently and privately own and trade in means of production, a class of workers willing to sell their labour power for a living, a legal framework promoting commerce, a physical infrastructure making the circulation of goods on a large scale possible, security for private accumulation, and so on. In many Third World countries, many of these conditions do not exist even today, even although there is plenty of capital and labour available; the obstacles for the development of capitalist markets are less a technical matter and more a social, cultural and political problem.

            Capitalism in its modern form can be traced to the emergence of agrarian capitalism and mercantilism in the Renaissance.’

            Wikipedia (even that is right, sometimes!)

          • Jules Wright

            Oh god. A cut-and-paste-jockey. Your point is? Back to Komment Macht Frei please!

          • pobjoy

            Grunt, swine.

  • Terry Field

    Why would any rational person wish to save the repulsive and catastrophically damaging Labour party??????
    It was dead and twitching when Blair took it over and made it into a sort of political Frankenstein.
    Now the fruit and nut brigade have taken over the membership it is, at last, a nasty little marginal protest party.

    • Texas Sunday Morning

      With three times the membership of the Conservative clique, whose average age is 71.

      • Observer1951

        Remind us who won the general election?

        • Texas Sunday Morning

          First Past the Post.

          • Observer1951

            Correct but that’s the system we have. Don’t forget that proportional representation would have produced an even larger Tory/UKIP majority!

          • Mary Ann

            uggg

          • Observer1951

            Thanks for the detailed analysis.

          • Mongo Part II

            PR is a lefty cause celebre, but they seem to forget that UKIP would have got over 80 seat with PR!

          • Leon Wolfeson

            …based on a straight-line analysis, which never works.

          • Jingleballix

            ……….it’s called democracy dear………I’m not surprised that the likes of you find it repulsive.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            No, you can’t make comparisons like that, voting patterns are very very different under PR.

    • Daffy Duck

      I have never voted Labour in my life. But Jeremy Corbyn is the real Labour Party. If you are a Left winger then Jeremy Corbyn is your man. The Guardian and its comment section have been bleating on for years about left wing this, anti Trident that, open door immigration etc etc etc…Now they have a leader who believes in all the nutty leftwing policies they have been fantasising about, and the Guardian has a daily anti Corbyn story.

      Good luck to Corbyn. He deserves the Labour leadership and they deserve him.

      • pobjoy

        I have never voted Labour in my life. But Jeremy Corbyn is the real Labour Party.

        Then why have you never voted Labour, when, in your view, it did not represent the Labour Party?

        • Terry Field

          Does that matter!????!

          • pobjoy

            If you don’t reply, readers will suspect your rationality/integrity.

          • Daffy Duck

            It does when you have been nominated house troll for the day.

      • Terry Field

        Yes, Corbyn is what you say – but what you refer to is an anachronistic and damaging absurdity that only deranged ignorant romantics can buy into

      • Ebst

        Since when is open-door immigration a left wing policy? May have been a Labour party policy when they were centre but by definition proper left wingers would want the doors shut and exit from eu.

        • Daffy Duck

          ‘By definition proper’…. Unfortunately that left wing definition died a long time ago.

        • Jingleballix

          ………since the Labour Party introduced it in the early 2000s.

          They believed that new immigrants are likely to vote Labour – ergo more and more immigrants is good for Labour.

          This was the same wickedly selfish party-centric logic that they adopted in the 1960s to destroy grammar schools – the educated (and concomitantly well-salaried) are less likely to vote Labour……..ergo, they reduced the numbers of people who were given a good education and procured good salaries.

          Labour is a very wicked political party – now that they are a ‘dying cockroach’, I have no idea why anyone would wish to save them.

          Besides……..times change, and the political needs of the electorate change, UKIP are filling the vacuum……and so will a new party for the hordes of muslims in Britain.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Oh, what will you call your party? Doesn’t Respect already do that?

            As you call allowing other views wicked, and talk about killing their members like sqashing bugs, in your run for a one-party state. As you ignore the data on education, of course, as you demand inequality be worse.

            And as you blame the Other for everything.
            Perhaps seeing people not just like you as evil explains why they won’t vote for you.

          • Jingleballix

            Cognitive dissonance in action….

            …..don’t put words into my mouth – I said nothing about killing members of any party, I said nothing about ‘killing’ at all.

            I said nothing about a ‘one party state’………

            ……..your last paragraph is utter gobbledygook.

            Typical LEFTIST……..lies, misrepresentation and rubbish.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Ah, so you deny your post exists, Mr. Cognative Dissonance. As you think by not mentioning your clear goals, you can hide them.

            As you claim English is gobbledygook. As you jump and up and down, and deliver politically correct, collectivist bigotry at the left. Proving my points to be on the right track.

        • jjjj

          Since when did the union leadership(s) really care about the workers?

          • Leon Wolfeson

            So, you think Unions are like your big business friends.

          • jjjj

            You know nothing about me and I find your trollish comments ‘Leon Wolfeson’ a bit suspect.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            I can read your posts. As you suspect someone, “jjjj”, because he does not hold your dogma. Of course you are afraid of the truth, as you hate on the workers.

          • jjjj

            I think you are here to portray a certain people in a very bad light.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Ah, so you argue that everyone is “by definition” an isolationist who hates trade and hence right wing.

          Tip – workers, united…

          • Ebst

            Tip – try reading and brushing up on the language.
            There is no argument, there is no assumption about “everyone”. There is however the understanding that left wing policies, real ones, are protectionist and a very important part of that is denial of foreign workers any position a domestic worker could do.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            So, you claim your post does not exist. As you try and redefine leftist politics to suit you, making them rightist and full of your hate of the Other. It’s your ideology, right there!

            As you try for your class war. As you fight the four freedoms. As you lie over and over, ignoring the studies – as you call your rich the only real workers, of course. As you support damaging streaming, for all it’s worth. As you ignore the actual trends of politics.

            Your right have never had it so good in the UK, not for centuries!

      • Leon Wolfeson

        So not being just like you is “nutty”.

    • Gimme some fight’n room

      ‘Why would any rational person wish to save the repulsive and catastrophically damaging Labour party?’

      Somebody has got to be pretend to be the opposition party – Labour under the Blairites were virtually indistinguishable from the Tory Party on all major issues – Open Borders, Immigration, EU membership etc – but they played that role of ‘opposition’ extremely well – convincing the public that they represented something different to the heir-to-Blair David Cameron and his dripping-wet Tory Party – or New Labour part Deux.

      With shock leadership winner Corbyn now running the Labour Party and to a certain degree Farage leading a growing UKIP – we could witness fresh hope – a glimmer of some real opposition for a change – on issues that really matter to people …. an end to an establishment who have had it their way for far too long now and don’t like anyone rocking the boat.

      They don’t like it up em!

      • jjjj

        On employment law they were certainly not like the Tories. I believe that the Blair administration reduced the qualifying period for claiming Unfair Dismissal to one year.

    • tolpuddle1

      Didn’t Mrs T do the same thing as Blair, only with the Conservative Party ?

    • Leon Wolfeson

      So, you’re all for a one party state. As you call that the only “rational” thing, as you note how much nicer it is than you. As you blame brigades in your mind, and as you show how scared of it you are.

      • Ebst

        fair play, you really are a loser. get a life dude.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          I have one, and don’t need to steal others.

  • jeffersonian

    ”This week a coup among the Liberals turned out the prime minister Tony Abbott and put in Malcolm Turnbull (who had himself been similarly thrown out of the leadership in 2009). I feel conflicted by this. ‘

    I don’t think you’re the only one feeling conflicted Mr Moore.

    I’m afraid that there are more than a few traits that Turnbull shares with our own PM. Could the Australian Liberals have made a grave mistake?

  • edithgrove

    Does it occur to anyone that the continuing success of the left is due entirely to corruption and incompetence at the centre and right of British politics, Rifkind, Straw and a stitched-up parliamentary commission/er for standards to name just this week’s more prominent protagonists, as yet ignored by the Spectator.

  • rationality

    The death of the Labour party is a massive exaggeration. It will be fine, mores the pity, when the ‘brave refugees’ come over here in droves and start votining en masse for the thieving party that thinks its morally acceptable to take what we earn and gives it to them so they can have the means to have millions of kids while we struggle to have any as we are simply working for Islam. Its an injustice that I cannot accept and I want all their benefits stopped and they can pay for their own kids education if they have more than two. Even better kick em out.

    And Labour will do nothing knowing its needs their votes to survive. They disgust me to the core.

    • tolpuddle1

      Mass-immigration is also supported by the Tories – or (the same thing) by the rich capitalists who finance the “Conservative” Party.

      • rationality

        You’re absolutely right. Short term shysters who are only concerned about their landlords property boom and corporations low wages. But the newcomers will only vote for the Thieving Party so they’re being incredibly short sighted as they will be cast into oblivion as their voters decline in number.

        All establishment parties should be neutered if we have a chance of surviving as a nation.

      • jjjj

        Yes, but up to a point. Even their greed will succumb to practicality.

  • tolpuddle1

    What the Labour Party needs – a complete indifference to “good” advice proffered it by bigoted Tories like Charles Moore.

    • Terry Field

      Confused again!
      see nursie – she has just the medication that you need.

      • tolpuddle1

        You’re evidently the one in hospital.

  • “what the Labour party needs is a parliamentary representation committee”

    What all political parties need is their disappearance, where new, Marxist free, political parties are created, candidates of which are vetted for Marxist ideology, the use of the polygraph being an important vetting tool.

    The following is a discovery I made in April regarding the fake collapse of the USSR, and what that fraudulent collapse proves about the institutions of the West…

    When Soviet citizens were liberated from up to 74 years of horrific Marxist oppression on December 26, 1991 there were ZERO celebrations throughout the USSR, proving (1) the ‘collapse’ of the USSR is a strategic ruse; and (2) the political parties of the West were already co-opted by Marxists,* otherwise the USSR (and East Bloc nations) couldn’t have gotten away with the ruse.

    ZERO celebrations, as the The Atlantic article inadvertently informs us…

    http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2011/12/20-years-since-the-fall-of-the-soviet-union/100214/

    Notice, however, the Kremlin staged anti-government demonstrations that took place in Russia (and other Soviet republics) in the years immediately preceding the ‘collapse’, yet ZERO celebrations after the ‘collapse’!

    A Pictorial Presentation Of The Fraudulent Collapse Of The USSR…

    (1) The Emblem of the Soviet Union atop the Russian State Duma building…

    http://footage.framepool.com/shotimg/qf/544004264-duma-kremlin-palace-russian-flag-red-square.jpg

    Notice that the State Emblem of the Soviet Union is illuminated at night for clear viewing by Muscovites…

    http://www.shutterstock.com/video/clip-3345878-stock-footage-street-traffic-on-okhotny-ryad-and-state-duma-at-evening-in-moscow.html

    …however the coat of arms of the Russian Federation, situated above the door between the fourth and fifth floors, isn’t illuminated, though either side of the heraldic design is illuminated for no apparent purpose other than to highlight the heraldic design’s obsolescence.

    (2) High atop the facade of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs building, the State Emblem of the Soviet Union is Illuminated with pinpoint precision at night…

    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4149/5168126126_02c5505a79_m.jpg

    (3) The State Emblem of the Soviet Union atop the Russian Ministry of Defense building, including other Soviet era iconography…

    http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/51802114.jpg

    (4) Soviet Red Stars atop Kremlin towers remain where Stalin placed them in 1935…

    http://rt.com/files/news/37/3d/30/00/russia-ukraine-dialogue-peskov.si.jpg

    (5) Moscow’s Central Post Office employees are still in the dark as to the ‘collapse’ of the USSR in late 1991..

    http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/dangerroom/2012/10/Central_telegraph_Moscow.jpg

    Why, you ask? Click the following link for the answer…

    https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSWwliNXIZONPNidfnkRh6BxX75JS3mQB5Qp0PCgGiYzNI61EF2

    (6) Headquarters of the Russian Federal Security Service, and the Soviet Union’s security service, the KGB…

    https://worldsgreatesttravelblog.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/russia-1021.jpg

    Note the State Emblem of the Soviet Union still over the main door (click picture to enlarge), and hammer and sickle logo still above the clock. And here’s the Lubyanka at nightime…

    http://vindenes.nu/gallery/wp-content/gallery/m419.jpg

    Note illumination of hammer & sickle, and enhanced illumination of area above the main door, where the office of the KGB chief was located (third floor).

    (7) Satellite image of the Volga River cities of Engels, (right), and Saratov (left)…

    http://img-fotki.yandex.ru/get/9504/190708966.8/0_8a367_1ca2f18f_L.jpg

    Engels Air Force Base is east of Engels city, where the two long parallel lines are located…

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-w6rMlJAPFXU/UJ7KEuTD1FI/AAAAAAAABnE/9JkaNrXYY28/s1600/RUSSIA-ENGEL.jpg

    Notice that Engels city and adjacent air base were named after Marxist “hero” Friedrich Engels, but the names were never changed after Russians were “liberated” from Soviet tyranny in December 1991 with the ‘collapse’ of the USSR.

    (8) The province of Leningrad Oblast is still named in honor of the great Russian persecutor (and Marxist “hero”), who despised and cruelly stamped out Russian culture…

    http://www.russianlessons.net/russia/leningrad/russia-leningrad.gif

    (9) The province of Kaliningrad Oblast is still named after Marxist “hero” Mikhail Kalinin, nominal head of the USSR, 1922-1946…

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/59/Kaliningrad_in_Russia.svg/1181px-Kaliningrad_in_Russia.svg.png

    (10) Red Star, the Official newspaper of the Soviet Union’s Ministry of Defense…

    http://www.callsignalpha.co.uk/newspaper.jpg

    Note the Soviet era title (Red Star) and the four Soviet emblems (representing awards) to the left of the masthead, the outer emblem displaying Vladimir Lenin. Now, click the following link to view the official newspaper of the Russian Ministry of Defense…

    http://www.redstar.ru/

    The newspaper is still called Red Star(!) and still has the four Soviet emblems with Vladimir Lenin still present!

    (11) Soviet roundel still on Russian military aircraft…

    http://theuspatriot.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Russian-fighter-jets1.jpg

    (12) Soviet era Communist emblem (the Soviet red star) still attached to the bows of Russian naval vessels…

    http://global.fncstatic.com/static/managed/img/fn-latino/news/Russian%20Naval%20Ship.jpg

    (13) The hated hammer & sickle logo still used by Aeroflot, purpose being to remind Russians when they travel abroad to be careful what they say to foreigners concerning the ‘collapse’ of the USSR and who’s still in control of the ‘former’ USSR…

    https://web.archive.org/web/20150329150207im_/http://www.airplane-pictures.net/images/uploaded-images/2013-8/31/316500.jpg

    (14) The brigades of the Armed Forces of Ukraine never destroyed their detested Soviet banners, nor did Kiev order the armed forces to destroy the reviled Soviet era banners …

    http://blouinnews.com/sites/default/files/styles/640×432/public/images/story/2014_03_04/7f095050f5b1431d027e102cb4b5d681.jpeg

    …and the left side of the Soviet banner…

    http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/cms/binary/9577387.jpg?size=640×420

    For more on this discovery see my blog…

    https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/

    Conclusion:

    The West will form new political parties where candidates are vetted for Marxist ideology, the use of the polygraph to be an important tool for such vetting. Then the West can finally liberate the globe of vanguard Communism.
    ————————-
    * The failed socialist inspired and controlled pan-European revolutions that swept the continent in 1848(1) thought Marxists and socialists a powerful lesson, that lesson being they couldn’t win overtly,(2) so they adopted the tactic of infiltration of the West’s political parties/institutions. In the case of the United States…(continue reading at DNotice)…

    https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/now-you-see-me-now-you-don-t

    Now you know why not one political party in the West requested verification of the collapse of the USSR, and the media failed to alert your attention to this fact, including the ‘alternative’ media. When determining whether the ‘former’ USSR is complying with arms control treaties, what does the United States do to confirm compliance? Right, the United States sends into the ‘former’ USSR investigative teams to VERIFY compliance, yet when it’s the fate of the West that’s at stake should the collapse of the USSR be a ruse, what does the United States do to confirm the collapse? Nothing!

    The fraudulent ‘collapse’ of the USSR (and East Bloc) couldn’t have been pulled off until both political parties in the United States (and political parties elsewhere in the West) were co-opted by Marxists, which explains why verification of the ‘collapse’ was never undertaken by the West, such verification being (1) a natural administrative procedure (since the USSR wasn’t occupied by Western military forces); and (2) necessary for the survival of the West. Recall President Reagan’s favorite phrase, “Trust, but verify”.

    It gets worse–the ‘freed’ Soviets and West also never (1) de-Communized the Soviet Armed Forces of its Communist Party officer corps, which was 90% officered by Communist Party members; and (2) arrested/de-mobilized the 6-million vigilantes that assisted the Soviet Union’s Ministry of the Interior and police control the populations of the larger cities during the period of ‘Perestroika’ (1986-1991)!

    There can be no collapse of the USSR (or East Bloc nations) without…

    Verification, De-Communization and De-mobilization.

    The West never verified the collapse of the USSR because no collapse occurred, since if a real collapse had occurred the West would have verified it, since the survival of the West depends on verification. Conversely, this proves that the political parties of the West were co-opted by Marxists long before the fraudulent collapse of the USSR, since the survival of the West depends on verification.

    The above means that the so-called ‘War on Terror’ is an operation being carried out by the Marxist co-opted governments of the West in alliance with the USSR and other Communist nations, the purpose being to (1) destroy the prominence of the West in the eyes of the world, where the West is seen (i) invading nations without cause; (ii) causing chaos around the globe; and (iii) killing over one-million civilians and boasting of torture; (2) close off non-Russian supplies of oil for export, thereby increasing the price of oil, the higher price allowing oil exporting Russia to maintain economic stability while she modernizes and increases her military forces; (3) destroy the United States Armed Forces via the never-ending ‘War on Terror’; the ultimate purpose of the aforementioned to (4) bring about the demise of the United States in the world, opening up a political void to be filled by a new pan-national entity composed of Europe and Russia (replacing the European Union), a union ‘From the Atlantic to Vladivostok’; which will (5) see the end of NATO.

    Now you know how Bolshevik Russia survived in 1917; how the West ‘lost’ China to the Communists in 1949; why the Eisenhower administration turned a deaf ear to the anti-Communist Hungarian uprising in 1956; why the Eisenhower administration in 1959 was indifferent to the Castro brothers’ Communist fidelity, actually used the CIA to overthrow the Batista government; why the Nixon administration abandoned Taiwan for Communist China, and signed treaties/provided economic aid to the USSR; why the Nixon administration refused to tell the American People that over 50% of North Vietnamese NVA regiments were actually Chinese People’s Liberation Army soldiers (attired in NVA uniforms, and proving that the Sino/Soviet Split was a ruse, as KGB defector Major Anatoliy Golitsyn told the West back in 1962), thereby (1) ensuring the Vietnam War would be lost; (2) destroying the prominence of the United States abroad and at home; (3) breeding distrust between the American people and their government; and (4) securing Communist victories in Southeast Asia. Working in the background within the political parties of the United States and Great Britain were Marxist agents doing their best to (1) ensure the survival of Communist nations when they popped up; and (2) sabotage any policies that would bring down a Communist nation. That’s why after the fake collapses of the East Bloc nations and USSR there was no mandatory Western verification process to ensure the Communists weren’t still in control.

  • Noa

    The death of socialism and the repellent Labour party would be a wonderful result of Corbyn’s leadership. It might even lead to a similar right wing conservative revolution in the Conservative party.
    As if….

  • Mongo Part II

    we don’t want the Labour party to recover. We want a Conservative govt with a strong UKIP as the main opposition party

    the people demand it

    • Jingleballix

      …………no, we want a UKIP government with a strong Tory opposition.

      • Terry Field

        ‘We’ excludes most of us.

    • Terry Field

      Fear not. It cannot recover, any more than Tamerlaine would have a role to play in the Middle East. The Tory party is a super-pragmatic 250 year old entity. The real issue is how will the social order deal with the removal of millions of middle class, middle-skilled rolls as digital expert systems and super-simulation systems take their place. The answer, of course, is simple – the new world of new lives will blossom without aid, IF the repulsive and very violent State is forced to become a marginal and benevolent guardian, and not the Brownian soviet-style sledgehammer that twisted mind tried to force on an unwilling nation

      • jjjj

        ‘The real issue is how will the social order deal with the removal of millions of middle class, middle-skilled rolls as digital expert systems and super-simulation systems take their place.’

        Correct.

  • Stuart Mc

    Scottish pride within British form’ how does this work?

    Gleefully accepting an eternity of Tory rule?

    • Terry Field

      No.
      Please go.
      We will visit your salmon streams periodically, but avoid the mucky faux-socialist grunge with some enthusiasm

      • Stuart Mc

        No need to. We will send the salmon down to your local Morrisons. You can pick it up there.

        Enjoy.

  • Ebst

    That first picture is like some sort of reunion of a Eurovision band from 40 years back or something.
    People go on about Corbyn, but would the Labour party really have been in much much better hands with one of the other three?
    Then of course there is the question of why would anyone want to save it?

  • Velo

    Can anyone see two fried eggs between Burnham and Corbyn in the photo for this article?

  • Maybe you could save the Labour party.

    But just because you can do a thing, it doesn’t necessarily follow that you should…

  • What the Labour Party needs is to DISBAND. Hasn’t the Left done enough? My god. The broken lives, and the dead ones. Shame, shame, shame!

    • Terry Field

      You are correct; observe, however, the reality – it is in fact doing just that!
      it is run by mendacious pygmies and warped nobodies.
      It is toast – and only mothers pride at that!
      Charles Moore here shows himself to be an old fashioned anachronism – for wishing the recovery of an absurdity.
      It reflects the would-be patrician architecture of his particular mind, perhaps???

      • jjjj

        You can say that about almost all politicians. And to think that Corbyn is intellectually equipped to deal with the challenges we are facing today in society is a joke. But the problem is with the entire system. Everything is up for reform or abolition: Our currency (see the comments by Martin Weale on Bitcoin) the Monarchy, Parliament. Corbyn’s question time game was a masterstroke. He gets the strength of grassroots and their ability to change things. It’s just that he will be one of the first victims of the pitchfork revolution.

        • Jack Rocks

          Bitcoin, what a joke. A hyped up pseudo currency used by mafia king-pins, criminals and paranoid conspiracy theorists.

          • jjjj

            Mama Mia, I think you are out to get me.

      • I’ve nothing against Mr Moore, but the Labour party really IS the answer to nobody’s question!

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