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Books

Was Genghis Khan the cruellest man who ever lived?

Frank McLynn’s latest biography is too lenient to the ‘Ruler of the Universe’, whose reign of terror was responsible for nearly 40 million deaths

27 June 2015

9:00 AM

27 June 2015

9:00 AM

Genghis Khan: The Man Who Conquered the World Frank McLynn

Bodley Head, pp.648, £25, ISBN: 9780224072908

From the unpromising and desperately unforgiving background that forged his iron will and boundless ambition, Temujin (as Genghis Khan was named at birth) rose to build an empire that was to range from Korea and China, through Afghanistan, Persia and Iraq and eventually to Hungary and Russia, constituting the largest contiguous land imperium in history.

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Available from the Spectator Bookshop, £20, Tel: 08430 600033. Sean McGlynn is the author of By Sword and Fire: Cruelty and Atrocity in Medieval Warfare.

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