Features

How your funeral director is ripping you off

There’s no legal obligation to use a funeral director. And it may be that you can make a better job of it

16 May 2015

9:00 AM

16 May 2015

9:00 AM

They say that death and taxes are the only two certainties in life. But there seems to be a third, linked to death and as painful as taxes. It’s the astronomical cost of organising a funeral.

My partner’s father died recently, and for the honour of a bog-standard cremation in a far from fashionable part of East Anglia she was charged just over £4,000. Jo felt no shame in asking for the cheapest option (it’s what her father would have wanted — he was never a man to waste money), and so the answer came as something of a shock. When a figure has you imagining the cheeky little jaunt to the Caribbean it could fund instead, you know things have turned serious.

‘How the hell do they justify four grand?’ I asked.

Jo went through the itemised list. Flowers: £150. She examined the picture of the lilies that would adorn the coffin. ‘A florist would charge you 40 quid for those,’ came her verdict. Aluminium urn for the ashes: £66. Not being so au fait with the urn market (who would be?) she couldn’t pronounce with any confidence — but we both knew that £66 was over the odds. The crematorium’s costs weighed in at £852. Another £76 went on the ‘service stationery’, essentially 20 copies of the words to the hymn we’d be singing. Though in fairness to the funeral directors, they did, after the funeral, send us one of the copies in a ring-binder, together with some photos of the flowers and a covering sheet saying that David had died ‘aged 82 ears’.


There was also a payment for £160, listed as ‘doctor’. Eh? A death certificate had already been issued by the hospital, and unless the undertakers were straying well beyond their remit and attempting a last-minute resuscitation, it was hard to see why a doctor would be needed. But it turns out that with cremations (as opposed to burials), a second doctor has to examine the body to check there’s nothing untoward: the ‘evidence’, as it were, is about to be destroyed. These payments, known in the medical profession as ‘ash cash’, are regarded as a perk of the job.

But even those expenses left the thick end of the headline figure unaccounted for. It transpired that the rest of the funeral firm’s services — storing the body for a couple of weeks, putting it in their cheapest coffin, driving it to the crematorium and paying four men in black suits to carry it inside — were costing us £2,865. This would have been even higher if we’d gone for any of the ‘extras’, such as a limousine to drive us behind the hearse, or a more ornate coffin (the white one imprinted with a sepia picture of the Manhattan skyline, perhaps), or the release at the service of several white doves.

In the end Jo couldn’t be bothered to argue the toss. You don’t, do you? Not when you’re concentrating on grieving, and know the costs represent a pretty thin slice off the inheritance that’s coming your way. Clearly undertakers are aware that Britain’s ridiculous property prices have put most people in this position, and ramp up their charges accordingly.

But what about the people who aren’t so comfortably off? A study for the Citizens Advice Bureau in Scotland last year found that more and more people were getting into debt over funeral expenses. A government fund exists to help in such cases, but it hasn’t kept pace with the increase in costs — an average of 7 per cent every year since 2004. Then there are the immigrant workers landed with huge bills when (as has happened) one of their team drops dead in the cabbage field next to them.

The Natural Death Centre (‘lifting the lid on dying and funerals’) campaigns on the issue of charges. Its manager, Rosie Inman-Cook, regularly takes calls from people in trouble. ‘Last week there was a Romanian woman whose partner had died suddenly. They’d been given permission to work here, and had just scraped together their last few pennies to pay the deposit on a flat. Where was she going to find the money for his funeral? No one back in Romania could afford to help out.’

How can you make a funeral cheaper? By recognising that there is no legal obligation to use a funeral director. The law requires only that you dispose of the body in a fitting manner. You can build a coffin yourself, or use one made by the deceased when they were alive. (Nelson’s coffin was made for him by one of his sailors, several years before his death.) In fact you don’t have to use a coffin at all — a shroud is fine. The body doesn’t have to be embalmed, and actually unless people are going to view it there’s little point. It can remain at your house between death and the funeral: nothing unpleasant will start happening in those few days. You can bury a body on your own land (subject to guidelines about proximity to water sources and the like). If you’re using a crematorium or graveyard, you can transport the body there yourself, getting friends and family to act as pallbearers. Wouldn’t that be nicer than four men you’ve never met before and will never meet again?

In fact, that’s the issue at the heart of all this: taking ownership of the farewell you are saying to your loved one. So much of the way we do it now is based on embarrassment. Very awkward, that silence when the undertaker asks if you’d like brass handles or just the plain steel ones. I’d even argue that sometimes our attitudes to funerals are rooted in denial, a subconscious refusal to accept that the person we knew is now just a body, which is either going to burn or rot. Somehow, goes the thinking, if we pay for those doves to be released, our relative will escape the laws of nature. People spend fortunes on burial plots in ‘prestigious’ cemeteries. Why? The worms don’t discriminate.

Fredric Baur, the man who invented the Pringles tube, had his ashes buried in a Pringles tube. The poet Ben Jonson was buried standing up so that his plot in Westminster Abbey would be cheaper (‘two feet by two is all I want’). Alistair Cooke asked for his ashes to be scattered in his beloved Central Park. But the New York authorities don’t allow this. So ten of Cooke’s relatives and friends each took an empty cup from a nearby branch of Starbucks, split the broadcaster up between them, and gathered in the park. After the 23rd Psalm and a ballad from Cooke’s son, everyone did the necessary.

You might disagree with half of it, but you’ll enjoy reading all of it. Try your first 10 weeks for just $10


Show comments
  • Caractacus

    Who needs the Crematorium? Throw me on a funeral pyre. Like a Viking.

    • WirralBill

      Before or after death?

      • John Lea

        Like it.

    • Dodgy Geezer

      Actually, a Viking funeral would involve quite a lot of other things being thrown on the fire after you to follow you into eternity.

      Your weapons, your horse or boat, your pets and maidservants and favourite wife…killed beforehand, of course – they were not uncivilised…

  • John Lea

    I had to organise a funeral recently, and agree completely with the thrust of this argument. We were given a price list, detailing all the options, and I noticed that at the very bottom there was a poignant sentence: ‘there is no cost for children under 12’ – or words to that effect. Horrible.

    • Dominic Stockford

      Why is that horrible?

      • gerronwithit

        You must be an undertaker.

        • Dominic Stockford

          An undertaker informs customers that in one particularly sad set of circumstances they will provide a free funeral, what is so horrible about that? Anyone directly concerned with such a situation would be mighty relieved not to have money to worry about at that moment on top of everything else.

          • Kit Ingoldby

            It isn’t that the free funeral is horrible, it is obviously an act of kindness, it is the banality of the language in such circumstances which is horrible.

      • John Lea

        You misunderstand me. It’s the idea that something so poignant could be reduced to the bathetic level of marketing speak – you know, ‘children under 12 go free!’ – that sort of thing. Of course I don’t find the idea of free funerals for children horrible – that would be ridiculous.

        • Dodgy Geezer

          As a matter of interest – how would you put it?

  • ExToryVoter

    A big problem with the industry is that vast numbers of high street funeral directors have been bought up by large, often American, corporate outfits. They retain the name of the old outfit, and often masquerade as being ‘independent’, but they are anything but. Their objective is quite simply to screw as much money out of the bereaved at what, by definition, is a difficult and trying time for them.
    Whilst these firms might have all the outward trappings such as top-of-the range vehicles and a smart chapel of rest, their service is generally poor, and families may be pressured into buying extras such as embalming; not necessary at all unless the deceased is going to be displayed like Lenin, though it does give the cremation a bit of a boost being an accelerant.
    I’m not sure though about going down the DIY route mind. I certainly wouldn’t want a body laid out in my house for any length of time; they can go off pretty fast and start oozing from every imaginable orifice. Death is still expensive unfortunately, but a better option would be to seek out a genuinely independent funeral director as they do still exist.

    • MirthaTidville

      At last some sense..As someone in the trade, I always urge people to get a price from an independent..The fastest increase in costs, for a funeral,are those levied by the local authorities. They are banging prices up to compensate for lack of Government funding. Most people want a decent Hearse for their loved one`s last journey…cost up to £130,000 per vehicle..You want your loved one moved in the middle of the night?..Undertakers have to maintain staff and an infrastructure in order to do that..Those costs have to be factored in..

      Frankly the author is clueless, other than sounding off at a large bill, he`s never done any research into the trade. He makes it sound so easy..So try DIY if you think you can save a few bob…I gaurantee you won`t do it again…

      Remember always get a price from a genuine Independant

      • Des Demona

        ”You want your loved one moved in the middle of the night?”
        That’s my plan for my clandestine burial on Hampstead Heath.

    • Callipygian

      though it does give the cremation a bit of a boost being an accelerant.
      But unless that makes for a cheaper cremation price, why should anyone care?

      And here’s a question: what if your ‘loved ones’ aren’t actually loved? What if you just want rid of the old witch, etc.? I’m not spending a penny more than necessary.

      • ExToryVoter

        Albeit slightly ‘off piste’ from the principal issue, one thing that doesn’t get discussed is the fact that as people get larger, so cremation costs rise. Whereas your average little old lady will probably be reduced to ashes in less than 90 minutes, the morbidly obese will, by contrast, take more than three hours before they’re done. And cremators use an awful lot of gas, believe me. An argument perhaps for differential pricing.

        • Callipygian

          Charge by the pound? But where will it end? Bigger seats on buses paid for with higher fares (the Fatsos Only section)?

          Reminds me of the joke between Jackie Gleason’s character and his friend, played by Art Carne. The former bemoans the fact that if he died, he’d have almost nothing to leave to his wife. Friend says: ‘Why don’t you leave your body to science? If they pay by the pound, she’ll be a millionaire!’

        • You are mistaken, it is the complete opposite. Crematorium ovens are still based on the original German J.A. Topf and Sons design. The oven uses the fat on the body as an accelerant. It is, in fact, the stick-thin old lady that takes a lot more gas to burn.

          • ExToryVoter

            All I can say is that when I worked as a bearer, the cremator operators would ask about size of the deceased because they had to factor approximate cremation times into their work schedule. And they always said larger equalled longer.

          • My comment referred to the amount of fuel required. It is cheaper to burn fat people. Of course it will take longer to cremate André the Giant than Ronnie Corbett but fat content of the body is also key in working out the fuel costs.

      • blandings

        back garden – free burial
        That’s where my cats are(the dead ones)
        Voice of experience – have a discreet marker, “bod here”, otherwise you’ll be forever digging them up.

        • Callipygian

          Very wise! :^0

          • blandings

            Oh and bury them deep – you don’t want alligators digging them up again in the middle of the night – worse than foxes I’m told.

          • Callipygian

            Ha! More likely to be armadillos. Nocturnal, and digging is what they do!

          • blandings

            Can you eat them?
            Just asking

          • Callipygian

            I wouldn’t advise it. They’re the only animal known to carry leprosy!

          • blandings

            Man eating alligators, leprous armoured rabbity things.
            What kind of place do you live in?
            Spiders the size of dinner plates maybe?

          • Callipygian

            Well now that you mention it… :^0

          • Violin Sonata.

            Oh come on cowardy custard. In Australia they have orange toads that if you lick they’ll
            put you into a delirious trance and then you’ll pop your clogs. And they have koalas .

          • Callipygian

            On another topic, Blandings: today I got fed up with my tedious role as sole gardener, carpet-cleaner, glass-washer, maid, dog-minder, Mr Fix-It and staff supervisor and declared ‘I QUIT!’ (with hubby on the other end of the phone, after explaining that our new irrigation system was not working because my masonry drill bit wouldn’t drill into the garage wall).

            Truly, if this were a job I’d hand in my resignation. It annoys me no end that older relatives (who have no ‘systems’ at all or have other people to tend them) seem to think I am a lady of leisure with nothing else to do than amuse myself all day. I can’t or won’t hire loads of help because a) they are unreliable, b) they charge too much, c) I don’t want to give up my privacy, d) I have a dog and she doesn’t like strangers about. I DO hire help, all the same, and that in itself is work for me, as I must negotiate the price and make sure they do it right. There is no escape from the burden of maintaining a high-maintenance property.

            I’m desperate for a holiday. Just gagging for one. As of June 5th I’ll be heading for the mountains… literally. If I haven’t put up a ‘back in 5 minutes’ sign and headed to the beach all day first!

          • Violin Sonata.

            I totally recognise your post. As a musician etc relatives of my chap think I don’t have
            the ‘ proper’ job . I even find myself looking after children of friends during the school
            holidays, they even moan when I am away, thinking it ‘ inconvenient’ of me.
            I totally get the privacy thing, who on earth wants strangers in their house.
            Do have a lovely holiday in the mountains, sounds delightful, we shan’t be going away
            again until September, which seems rather far away at the moment.

          • Callipygian

            I hear you! Chuckle. Nice to know for both of us that someone else understands! And your September get-away will probably be more exotic than mine.

          • Violin Sonata.

            Not that exotic really, we’re thinking of Malta or somewhere similar.
            Your trip to the mountains sounds delightful.
            A lot of my friends think the world has come to an end if they
            cannot get internet access whilst away, its so amusing.

          • Callipygian

            How do you know that wouldn’t be me?! :^0

          • Callipygian

            P. S. I’ll be SO glad when hubby gives up his job next summer. I’ll finally have a man around the house to help!

          • Violin Sonata.

            Quite right too 😉 Sometimes when they have all consuming jobs it seems as if everything is up to you, almost like you’re single. Although I hear some replace all consuming jobs for all consuming hobbies.
            My hubby also hopes to leave his job at some point, hopefully he’ll be able to.
            He works for a large American car company ( here in the UK ) A job with all the trappings but not good for the health or free time.

          • Callipygian

            Yes I certainly sympathize, with your hubby, too. One wonders in the end if it’s worth it. The answer is Yes until it becomes No!

            ‘almost like you’re single’: Oh exactly, only without a singleton’s streamlined life!

          • Violin Sonata.

            Hello, I’ve returned here to have a moan. If you ever get hired help in watch what they’re doing.

            Our garden people have done a good job on the front garden but have totally
            cut back our 6ft wild rose bush that was around the pond in the back garden ( the centre piece) saying some brambles were around it and it had some dead wood. They say it will grow back- when ?? Just be careful with people you hire especially when they do their own thing.

            I also see your going on holiday tomorrow, do have a lovely
            time in those mountains. I imagine a lovely log cabin over looking those mountains 😉

          • Callipygian

            Hi, that is awful when garden people over-cut (we don’t have gardeners here, unfortunately, just what I call ‘janitors of the landscape’). I won’t let them prune my shrubs for that reason. I want judicious and shapely trimming and they savage the bushes like some character from a horror flick. Anyway, yes, you must watch ’em like a hawk. So sorry about your rose bush.

          • Callipygian

            And thanks for your good holiday wishes!

          • Violin Sonata.

            ‘ Alligators’ We don’t have those here . Just a few drunk few sharp toothed girls in their twenties becoming drunk in the middle of the local town.
            PS glad only the ‘ dead’ cats are buried, Mr Blandings, the cats that are alive must be
            so relieved they’ve not received the same fate.

          • blandings

            No alligators? How boring.

          • Violin Sonata.

            Thank you Mr Blandings, but I’d rather find my excitement
            elsewhere and not by having a prehistoric beast wandering around my honeysuckle and wild roses.
            You can keep your alligators mind you they’ll see off any stray
            moggies wandering into the garden let alone the ones buried .

          • blandings

            So what kind of prehistoric beast would you like to find wandering around your honeysuckle?
            PS: I don’t do Sundays

          • Callipygian

            Hilarious!

          • Violin Sonata.

            Now do behave Mr Blandings. Do they lock you in a potting shed on Sundays ?
            Do you brew dodgy alcohol in there, I’ve heard about those places and men.
            My honeysuckle and come to that my dropping butterfly bush couldn’t cope with any
            rampaging or even wandering . Both at that blossoming time of year.

          • blandings

            Sunday is my day of rest.
            A chap’s gotta pace himself as I’m sure you know.

          • Violin Sonata.

            How inconsiderate of me, rampaging when not in those salad days must be exhausting.
            Of course you must have a deserved rest and surrounded with the fruits of your labour.
            Pace yourself as much as you like, as they say as man is as young as the woman they feel.

          • blandings

            A proposition that I am willing to test, though I must beware of both my wife and my mistress, neither of whom are as liberal as you.

          • Violin Sonata.

            Yes you put that to the test and I am sure you can wrap the wife
            and mistress around your finger. Maybe a holiday or chocolates.
            So I am liberal am I, not sure if that’s a good thing or bad thing.

          • blandings

            I think I’d prefer you illiberal, if I get a say

          • Violin Sonata.

            Ah encouraging fiddle players to misbehave, wild hair and unleashing that inner illiberal ‘ Katie Hopkins’
            You Mr Blandings are incorrigible 😉

          • blandings

            I don’t go for simpering women – “misbehavin'” is far more sporting

          • Violin Sonata.

            I generally misbehave but look so innocent and do it so discretely
            people thing they got it wrong.

          • blandings

            I wouldn’t get it wrong.

          • Callipygian

            Are you flirting with the lady, B? :^0

          • blandings

            I think I am.
            I can’t help myself.
            Gimme a gal and I’ll flirt.
            The world would be a far better place if more people spent more time tending their garden and flirting.
            I hope you agree!

          • Callipygian

            I do agree, even though I’m an ex-flirter myself.

          • blandings

            “Ex-flirter?
            Sounds like I missed out.

          • Callipygian

            Not on much, B. Put it this way: remember that photo of me in my early 20s? That was just a year or two before the end of my s – x life. Or at least, one worth the name. Even I am shocked by it, how the unthinkable happens and keeps happening and becomes permanent.

          • blandings

            I was about to say that I wish I could help, but I realised just in time how bad that sounded.
            Sex can be good, but bad sex is worse than none. I’ve not had that many lovers – six I think and I only enjoyed sex with two.

          • Callipygian

            Very frank and truthful of you. I don’t miss it now, partly because my lizard brain has had its tail broken off so many times that it hasn’t grown one back, and partly because it’s so remote from my experience now that I don’t remember what I once missed. Man can get used to anything, thank god. I was on a forum once where women (and some men) were sharing their horrors and tales of woe on this subject — the vast majority were married and had been for some time — and one of the women informed us all that she was leaving her husband: she’d decided. There was I suspect among the others, including me, a slight feeling of ‘I wish I could do that’, but since I thought my life would end up worse instead of better, and love my husband no matter what, I knew I couldn’t. And didn’t. And won’t. Knowing that and accepting it is the only way for me to be happy.

          • Callipygian

            According to Marcus Berkmann in A Shed Of One’s Own, women most approve of men with certain features, which include owning a half-a-million dollar house, liking pets but not football, not smoking, and not having had more that six previous sexual partners. Oh, and they must be dark-haired (are you dark-haired?) and at least 5’10”. So there you are: you’re an absolute dream (probably).

          • blandings

            Read in the Times today that the author Georges Simenon really did sleep with ten thousand women. That would be one a day for thirty years with Sundays off.
            A want to go and lie down in a darkened room.
            Used to like playing football and cricket – At cricket I had a secret weapon – I’m a left handed bowler but a right handed batsman. Sadly I wasn’t good enough in either role to be considered anything but a curiosity. Broke my nose whilst fielding in the slips, which gives a rugged edge to my pretty boy looks.
            I am dark- haired still, though my beard is grey if I don’t shave.
            Used to smoke in my Gitanes and sunglasses phase. You can’t imagine how cool I was.
            Like pets, though I would draw the line at tarantulas and alligators. I find snakes fascinating and beautiful.
            I am exactly 5′ 10″ , though this is luck rather than good planning.
            $500,000 doesn’t buy much in the UK anymore unless you move to the sticks.
            Did Marcus Berkmann not consider why a chap might have no more than six sexual partners? Not all reasons are equal.

            I like that Joan River’s joke about how men can sleep around all they want, but if a girl makes nineteen or twenty mistakes she’s a tramp.
            Am I a dream? – I’ll ask ( I know the answer: no and I’m too old anyway- we should be allowed a dress rehearsal)

          • Callipygian

            Thoroughly enjoyed that — and yes, Joan Rivers seems to have had as sharp a sense of women’s position as I do. Or should I say ‘situation’ heh heh heh. A rugged edge is fine, as long as one doesn’t become all rugged edge which is to say Mike Tindall. It is amazing and perhaps a bit depressing that half a mill, which ought to sound like a lot, is hardly sufficient to buy a barn these days. In America, of course, it’s much different: I’m sure my property isn’t worth nearly half a mill, and it’s much better than a barn. Berkmann was merely reporting details of what a dating agency claimed were the results of its survey — creating a sort of ‘composite ideal man’ that doesn’t actually exist. ‘We should be allowed a dress rehearsal’: I’ve had mine, except that the do-over will have to happen in forward time. I spent the first 47 years learning how to be me. Now I know, and who knows how many remaining in which to put that into effect.

          • blandings

            My rugged edge is more akin to an elegant duelling scar.
            I do not look like him.

          • Callipygian

            Ah yes, my hubby has one of those. Motorcycle accident in Central America, aged 20. He was reckless but not revolutionary, I’m glad to say.

          • blandings

            I can’t even claim recklessness, I just got in the way.

          • Violin Sonata.

            There are some little buds in my garden that refuse to blossom
            whereas others are reseeding themselves rampantly amongst
            other plants, its enough to make a bishop blush 😉

          • Violin Sonata.

            Mr Blandings, I meant to ask the other lady just now. Maybe she’ll read this but you can advise too. How long will it take a 6ft wild rose bush to grow back ?
            The people who are ‘ helping’ with the garden have completely
            chopped it back. I am very upset, it apparently had some brambles around it. It flowered beautifully every year.

  • Anthony Knowles

    Very interesting article this, and one of the main reasons I’ve set up a company to make a positive effect on this industry. I’m a young entrepreneur and at the tender age of 16 one of my best friends committed suicide. It was only then the real shock and grievement issues ever came to my mind about how much the death of a loved one can affect the state of mind. I recently set-up http://www.onlinefuneral.co.uk so that people can compare prices online and arrange their loved ones funeral from the comfort of their home. This gives utter transparency with the consumer, making sure that Funeral Directors do not get the chance to rip people off, and the way the market is currently going, they have to use me or be wary that online will cripple their current business as more and more people look to online for help.

    I hope this helps and we can help fight this issue together.

    Anthony

  • Iain Paton

    I want to be strapped to my kayak, with my bow and arrows, set on fire and pushed into the sea.

    • Callipygian

      Is your kayak made of plastic?

    • Eaglet2

      That’ll cost you extra……

    • Dodgy Geezer

      But…but… everyone knows that you can’t have your kayak and heat it!

      Or at least Muir and Norden do….

    • MathMan

      Worth having a punt on this idea.

  • WirralBill

    Where’s Stelios when you need him? “EasyFuneral” would be a very welcome addition to his portfolio.

    • Des Demona

      An orange coffin though?

  • ClemenceDR

    Amazed that dear Decca Mitford’s The American Way of Death isn’t even mentioned. She made all those points and more almost half a century ago, and very entertainingly, too.

  • kentgeordie

    Please note that the coffin that looks like oak is almost certainly chipboard covered in plastic oak-effect veneer, and the handles that look like brass are almost certainly plastic covered in brass-effect plastic.

    • Callipygian

      Why waste quality?

  • Shorne

    I hope the story about Alistair Cooke is correct because as I recall parts of his cadaver were stolen by illegal traders in body parts.
    If I make it to my 65th birthday later this year I’m going to start a funeral plan and hopefully have paid in enough after 5 years so that my ‘relict’ will not have too much to worry about.
    (I’m not an undertaker or involved in insurance etc.)

  • Don’t forget the totally pointless act of embalming or “hygienic treatment” as the undertaker calls it. Particularly galling when you consider that the doctor probably signs the second authorisation AFTER all the blood has been drained out of the deceased and replaced with embalming fluid. Is he dead? An easy 150 quid, I’d say.

    • What rubbish. The doctor is most cases the sings the second authorisations before the body is taken by the undertakers.

  • blandings

    “How your funeral director is ripping you off”

    Well, if he manages it twice I’ll give him a hefty bonus.

  • Ted Viking

    I conducted a burial in a small back garden in Teddington a few years ago. It got national press attention when the house went on the market following the death (and burial in the back garden) of the old man who wanted to spend eternity in the garden of the family home for the last 50 years. I tried to point out that the house would probably be sold, they would be exhumed and cremated but he was adamant so we followed his instructions.
    The key point has been made many times in the comments – don’t accept the first quote. And be prepared to negotiate.
    The company used by is clearly part of Dignity – as mentioned by ‘exToryVoter’ – a highly profitable business, originally owned by Americans but floated on the UK stockmarket 10 years ago. You’d have done well to buy their shares but avoid their products since the share price has increased nearly 10 fold in 10 years. All because they know most people don’t shop around and pay what is asked.

  • Ambientereal

    And that´s why people lately firmly refuse to die !!!

  • mikewaller

    As storing the body was shown to be a very significant cost, why has not capitalism thrown up refrigerated storage units specifically for this purpose that would be under the direct control of the individual renting them?

    P.S. At the risk of offending John Lea, I do hope that any entrepreneur taking up this suggestion remembers the poor old pensioner who set him on the road to fame and fortune! [:-)]

Close