Books

The secret of success in Formula 1

6 April 2024 9:00 am

For decades, competitive advantage depended on finding loopholes in the sport’s rule book – and no one knew that better than the British entrepreneur Bernie Ecclestone

The rat as hero

6 April 2024 9:00 am

After adopting two baby rats as pets, Joe Shute slowly overcomes his aversion and learns to appreciate the intelligence of creatures that are really quite like us

My prep school scarred me for life

6 April 2024 9:00 am

‘A part of me died at school’, Charles Spencer writes in his shockingly stark account of sadism and sexual abuse at Maidwell Hall, Northamptonshire, in the 1970s

Stories of the Sussex Downs

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Focusing on a 20-mile square of West Sussex, Alexandra Harris explores its rich history, from the wreck of a Viking longboat to a refuge for French Resistance agents

The horrors of the Eastern Front

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Nick Lloyd reinforces Churchill’s sentiment that the first world war in the East was ‘one of the most frightful misfortunes to befall mankind’

Why today’s youth is so anxious and judgmental

30 March 2024 9:00 am

In a well-evidenced diatribe, Jonathan Haidt accuses the creators of smartphone culture of rewiring childhood and changing human development on an unimaginable scale

On the road with Danny Lyon

30 March 2024 9:00 am

The celebrated photojournalist describes his peripatetic youth recording revolution in Haiti, hunger and homelessness in Mexico and the civil rights movement in the US

Caught in a Venus flytrap: Red Pyramid, by Vladimir Sorokin, reviewed

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Sorokin’s satirical stories are not for the fainthearted, but there are few more dedicated critics of Russia's infinite bureaucracy writing fiction today

Resolute, dignified and intelligent: Elizabeth II inspired loyalty from the start

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Alexander Larman describes how, from 1945 onwards, the House of Windsor set about rebranding itself after a decade of crisis both internal and external

The world’s largest flower is also its ugliest

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Known as ‘corpse flower’, the sinister Rafflesia resembles slabs of bloody, white-flecked meat, emits the scent of rotting flesh and eventually subsides into a mass of black slime

How country living changed the lives of three remarkable women writers

30 March 2024 9:00 am

Harriet Baker describes how Virginia Woolf, Sylvia Townsend Warner and Rosamond Lehmann found new forms of peace and creativity away from the stifling capital

‘Enough to kill any man’: the trials of serving Queen Victoria

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Of all the Queen’s prime ministers, Gladstone suffered the most from her wilfulness, but while he opposed her policies he did much to popularise her monarchy

The curious influence of Oscar Wilde on Hollywood

23 March 2024 9:00 am

After Wilde’s visit to the US in 1882, his philosophy of life became an inspiration to early filmmakers in their revolt against corporate America, Wall Street and provincial pettiness

A voyage of literary discovery: Clara Reads Proust, by Stéphane Carlier, reviewed

23 March 2024 9:00 am

A 23-year-old hairdresser casually picks up a copy of Swann’s Way left behind by a client – only to find the novel taking over her life

The true valour needed to go on pilgrimage in Britain

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Oliver Smith finds sanctity in remote peninsulas and holy islands, but is less impressed by the tacky ephemera that decorate our more accessible shrines

Boxing clever: Headshot, by Rita Bullwinkel, reviewed

23 March 2024 9:00 am

As eight teenage girls progress through a boxing championship in Reno, fighting is shown to be an undeniable, animal part of femininity in this knockout debut novel

Garbriel García Márquez has been ill-served by his sons

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Posthumously published against the author’s wishes, Until August should not detract from Marquez’s best work – but it would have been better left as a curiosity in the archives

New light on the New Testament

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Candida Moss reveals that many New Testament texts, including St Mark’s Gospel, were penned by enslaved scribes who became influential interpreters of Christian scripture

The healing power of Grasmere

23 March 2024 9:00 am

Following in Wordsworth’s footsteps, Esther Rutter finds new self-confidence and happiness in the entrancing surroundings of Dove Cottage

Ghosts of the KKK still haunt American politics

23 March 2024 9:00 am

The extreme savagery of the ‘white knights’ may be a thing of the past, but echoes of the Klan were all over the shameful Capitol attack of 2021, says Kristofer Allerfeldt

How ever did the inbred Habsburgs control their vast empire?

16 March 2024 9:00 am

For centuries, a line of mentally retarded monarchs managed extraordinary feats of engineering across the world against all odds

The dirty war of Sefton Delmer

16 March 2024 9:00 am

Anything to break German morale was allowable in Delmer’s broadcasts from Wavendon Towers – which purported to come from a disgruntled character within Nazi Germany

How much would your family stump up for your ransom?

16 March 2024 9:00 am

Researching The Price of Life, Jenny Kleeman interviews Stephen Collet, who describes haggling for a year with the Somali pirates who kidnapped his sister in October 2009

Work, walk, meditate: Practice, by Rosalind Brown, reviewed

16 March 2024 9:00 am

An Oxford undergraduate makes a detailed plan for getting the most out of a quiet Sunday in January, but soon starts musing on what it feels like to be distracted

Conning the booktrade connoisseurs

16 March 2024 9:00 am

Fuelled by loathing and resentment, Thomas James Wise set about defrauding as many privileged bibliophiles as he could – only to be rumbled by two of their number