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The traditional British hedge is fast vanishing

The best hedges teem with the biodiversity that plays such a vital part in our future. Yet, since the 1950s, farmers and developers have been destroying them at an alarming rate

11 May 2024

9:00 AM

11 May 2024

9:00 AM

Hedgelands: A Wild Wander Around Britain’s Greatest Habitat Christopher Hart

Chelsea Green, pp.208, 20

Five years ago, a documentary about the Duchy of Cornwall featured the then Prince of Wales in tweeds and jaunty red gauntlets laying a hawthorn hedge. It was a brilliant piece of PR. If Charles was a safe pair of hands with a hedge – something as quintessentially English as a hay meadow or a millpond – he was surely a safe pair of hands full stop.

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