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The diary of a tortured man: Deceit, by Yuri Felsen, reviewed

20 August 2022

9:00 AM

20 August 2022

9:00 AM

Deceit Yuri Felsen, translated by Bryan Karetnyk

Prototype Publishing, pp.200, 12

Yuri Felsen, born in St Petersburg, was an exile in Riga, Berlin and Paris and died at Auschwitz in 1943. Had his archive not been destroyed, we might find him on the same shelf as Vladimir Nabokov, Vladislav Khodasevich and Ivan Bunin – the glittering Russian literati of 1930s Paris – and Georgy Adamovich, who said that Felsen’s prose ‘left behind a light for which there is no name’.

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