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Why the mid-1960s was the golden age of pop music

4 December 2021

9:00 AM

4 December 2021

9:00 AM

What They Heard: How The Beatles, The Beach Boys and Bob Dylan Listened to Each Other and Changed Music Forever Luke Meddings

Weatherglass Books, pp.240, 11.99

On a Monday evening in May 1966, Paul McCartney and John Lennon visited a nightclub called Dolly’s in Jermyn Street. The two Beatles were accompanied by two Rolling Stones, Brian Jones and Keith Richards. Already at the club was Bob Dylan, stopping off in London on his European tour.

Dylan had first met Lennon and McCartney nearly two years earlier at the Delmonico Hotel in New York.

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