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Paradise and paradox: an inner pilgrimage into John Milton

2 October 2021

9:00 AM

2 October 2021

9:00 AM

Making Darkness Light: The Lives and Times of John Milton Joe Moshenska

Basic Books, pp.456, 25

When E. Nesbit published Wet Magic in 1913 (a charming novel in which the children encounter a mermaid), she took it for granted that her young readers would immediately pick up the references to ‘Sabrina Fair’ from Milton’s Comus. Phrases from Milton were part of the language — ‘Tomorrow to fresh woods’; ‘Better to reign in hell than serve in heaven’.

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