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Not so dryasdust: how 18th-century antiquarians proved the first ‘modern’ historians

3 July 2021

9:00 AM

3 July 2021

9:00 AM

Time’s Witness: History in the Age of Romanticism Rosemary Hill

Allen Lane, pp.391, 25

Antiquaries have had a bad press. If mentioned at all today, they are often derided as reclusive pedants poring over details of manuscripts and shards with little relevance to the wider world. As recently as 1990, the respected ancient historian Arnaldo Momigliano skewered their pretensions when he described them as ‘interested in historical facts without being interested in history’.

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