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Features Australia

Cashless in Alice

24 October 2020

9:00 AM

24 October 2020

9:00 AM

Income Management and the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) have long faced opposition from those who claim that not allowing welfare to be spent as recipients choose denies them ‘financial freedom’ and imposes unnecessary restrictions. But the issue is that this ‘financial freedom’ can fuel destructive lifestyles. And it is the responsibility of government to ensure that taxpayer money is spent on the aims of welfare — to provide the necessities of life — rather than drugs, alcohol and gambling.

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Jacinta Nampijinpa Price is Director of the Indigenous Research Program at the Centre for Independent Studies, which will shortly be publishing a research paper on the Cashless Debit Card program.

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