Barometer

Mazes; royal babies; carbon data; FTSE falls

20 October 2018

9:00 AM

20 October 2018

9:00 AM

Twists and turns

Jeremy Hunt, taking a group of EU foreign ministers around the maze at Chevening House in Kent, likened it to Brexit. It is not surprising if he finds the maze at Chevening difficult, because it was deliberately designed by the 2nd Earl of Stanhope, a mathematician, to be a greater challenge than garden mazes which preceded it. Most at the time had a simple rule: if you kept your hand on one hedge you would eventually reach the centre. This was known as a ‘simply connected’ maze. Chevening, however, was one of the first ‘multiply connected’ mazes, which don’t have a simple rule to find the centre.

Procreating royals

The Duchess of Sussex is expecting a baby ‘next spring’. How long does it take a royal couple to produce a child after the wedding?

Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales
11 months
Prince Harry and the
Duchess of Sussex
10-12 months?
Prince Andrew and
Sarah Ferguson
2 years 1 month
Prince William and the
Duchess of Cambridge
2 years 3 months
Princess Royal and
Captain Mark Phillips
4 years 0 months
Prince Edward and the
Countess of Wessex
4 years 5 months

 

Carbon data


How is the UK getting on with reducing its carbon emissions? There are two ways to measure a country’s CO2 emissions — ‘territorial’ basis, which includes only those emissions within the country itself, and ‘consumption’ basis, which includes emissions spewed out around the globe in the cause of manufacturing goods and providing services for that country’s people.

Measurements in metric tons co2

Territorial basis / Consumption basis
1995
560 / 654
2005
564 / 727

2015
416 / 596

 
So territorial emissions have fallen by 25% in 25 years but consumption emissions by only 9%. Source: globalatlas.com

Falling FTSE

The FTSE100 fell by more than 10%, which is generally regarded as a ‘correction’. How does that compare with other ones recently?

Dec 1999–March 2003
-49.6%
Oct 2007–March 2009
-47.5%

April 2010–June 2010
-16.1%

Feb 2011–Sept 2011
-16.7%

March 2012–May 2012
-11.8%
April 2015-Feb 2016
-21.9%

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