Features Australia

Love is love, boys

17 March 2018

9:00 AM

17 March 2018

9:00 AM

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has again flagged his intention to deliver a national apology to the victims of institutional child abuse along with compensation through a national redress scheme paid for by you, the taxpayers.

Speaking after a ceremony with Premiers Andrews and Berejiklian at Kirribilli House six days after appearing with wife Lucy at the Mardi Gras, Mr Turnbull said the recently concluded Royal Commission ‘validated the stories of the survivors’ and enabled them ‘to be believed’.

Whilst it has been the fashion for virtue-signalling politicians to offer national apologies – Kevin Rudd’s apology to the so-called Stolen Generation, Julia Gillard’s apology over forced adoptions – and cash compensation, there seems to be no evidence that such gestures have delivered anything more than a feel-good moment for the deliverer of the sentiment, temporary public recognition for the recipient and encouragement for others to form victim groups and hit the taxpayer for recompense. And larger tax bills for those who still pay taxes and are not recipients of the government’s sweeping cash redistribution program.

Writing in the excellent Quadrant (which has had its modest government funding withdrawn and given to leftist groups), Keith Windschuttle has rejected the idea of a national apology, saying Mr Turnbull would be wrongly attributing blame. He said the nation itself has never approved of child sexual abuse. All states and territories have long had laws against it. ‘The blame for crimes of pederasty lie squarely with those who perpetrate them. To say otherwise is to deny the basic idea of all morality, that individuals are responsible for their actions… While institutions can bear some responsibility for crimes if they encourage or tolerate them, or turn a blind eye, and while court cases of individual prosecutions have established clearly some institutional failings of this kind, it is plainly wrong to blame the nation.’

He noted that though the Royal Commission and the media who have fawned on its assertions have worked hard to demonise the Catholic Church, the commission’s own statistics show otherwise. The biggest single group of victims were not altar boys or choristers, or even Catholic school students, but inmates of out-of-home care institutions, that is, foster care households and homes for the disabled, orphans and homeless.


‘Apart from that, one apparently obvious inference from the report’s statistics is that it is mainly boys who are victims (63.6 per cent) and it is mainly adult men who are the perpetrators (92.8 per cent male, and 83.8 per cent adult).

‘In short, child abuse in institutions seems to be committed mainly by homosexual men, preying on vulnerable and disturbed children displaced from their own families. However, not even this broad conclusion is reliable. The Commission’s figures are all based on 9,325 verbal and written accusations, none of them formally cross-examined. Of these, the Commission could only refer 2,562, or 27 per cent, to the police… In other words, three out of four complainants did not provide good enough evidence to take the matter any further.’

This is not dissimilar to the real results of the Royal Commission into the so-called Stolen Generation. Though there was much moral brow-beating, those who claimed to have been members of that generation have been singularly unsuccessful in pressing their suits in courts which require more rigorous evidence than the hearsay and fantasy accepted by the commission.

So, if adult males were responsible for the overwhelming majority of cases of sexual abuse found to have occurred in institutions, why aren’t adult male homosexuals made responsible for the bill now?

That is not to say that all male homosexuals are paedophiles, far from it, but it is a fact that a paedophile organisation was associated with the Mardi Gras until that relationship was drawn to the attention of the Carr Labor government in NSW which then demanded that NAMBLA (the North American Boy Love Association) be dropped from the list of sponsors and friends included in the Mardi Gras program. Until then, apparently no Mardi Gras organiser or sponsor saw anything wrong with associating with a known paedophile lobby group.

Similarly, those who lobby for the Marxist-inspired Safe Schools program haven’t distanced themselves from the current deputy director of the La Trobe centre, Gary Dowsett, who helped develop the program, even though he has publicly argued that paedophilia should be part of the homosexual movement and that it must be legally recognised and depicted as part of a wider sexual liberation. In the journal Gay Information, Dowsett wrote: ‘How different then is that gentle, tentative sexuality between parent and child from the love of a paedophile and his or her lover? That kind of love, warmth, support and nurture is an important part of the paedophilic relationship.’ A spokesman for La Trobe said last year that Dowsett has not been a supervisor or team member of the Safe School program, or an investigator and/or co-author of the research projects that underpin that program. However, Dowsett’s work is cited by a number of researchers and he was influential in installing the Safe School program in Victoria as a member of the Victorian government’s ministerial advisory committee on homosexual health.

Given the empirical evidence provided by the Royal Commission, surely it is time that the greater homosexual community took some responsibility for those damaged by paedophile members?

The Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade is sponsored by a number of organisations, including notably ANZ, Qantas, Medibank, Holden, Wella, beauty products, Star Casino, Google, Accor Hotels, Pernod Ricard, Tinder, the NSW government and the Sydney city council. The organisers of this year’s march claim its 12,300 participants were watched by an estimated 300,000 spectators, so perhaps they could underwrite the redress program. Or was the whole thing just a distraction from the real issue of child abuse in dysfunctional Aboriginal communities and broken homes?

As commentator Gerard Henderson regularly reminds his readers, the ABC has never apologised for the support that organisation historically offered paedophiles, indeed a former chairman publicly endorsed the notion. Wealthy homosexuals and corporations generously supported the homosexual marriage lobby earlier this year but like the ABC, show no appetite for exposing or indeed even recognising the reality of homosexual abuse in institutions.

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