Features Australia

The war we don’t know how to fight

7 October 2017

9:00 AM

7 October 2017

9:00 AM

One day, perhaps before it is too late, Turnbull, Brandis, Shorten and co. and their fellow members of the political class in Europe may wake up to the fact that the West is engaged in an existential struggle in which employment figures, homosexual marriage and submarines are not the fundamental issues.

While border security and conventional defence policies are of the greatest importance they are not fighting the modern cultural blitzkrieg. Poet Peter Kocan said in one bitter verse that it is like having a fearless armoured knight on guard while the city falls to internal enemies.

What the present political leadership of Australia and other Western countries seem incapable of counteracting, or even comprehending, is that we are engaged in a new kind of conflict – an onslaught by the Left to politicise every aspect of life from football to science fiction.

Accompanying this is the Muslim ‘stealth jihad’. While in Australia the authorities have done a good job in keeping terrorism in check, they seem unaware of the threat to national identity posed by simple demographics. Poland and Hungary, having just recovered their national identities after decades of merciless oppression, seem determined to fight the threat to them, while the Scandinavian countries have largely given up the fight.

Determinedly counter-cultural German girls, after a spate of sex-attacks by Muslims, recently marched under a banner proclaiming ‘Rapists Welcome!’ It is possible that experience may change their minds. Also in Germany a court, perhaps overcome by nostalgia, freed Muslims who had burnt down a synagogue.


American conservative philosopher William Kilpatrick wrote recently, in words the Australian political classes would do well to heed: ‘Europe is currently in the process of submitting to Islam, and America also seems destined to eventually submit … [and] it most probably won’t be through force of arms. The civilisational struggle… is primarily a culture war. The Cold War was in large part a cultural war, and America won it because it didn’t have qualms about demonstrating the superiority of the American way to the Soviet way…’

He continues: ‘A culture war can only be fought by cultural institutions—schools, churches, political and civic organisations and so on. As things stand, however, none of our cultural institutions have shown much evidence that they are equipped to fight a culture war with cultural jihadists. The chief reason this is so is that most of these institutions are still fighting the last culture war — the civil rights struggle and the concomitant war against intolerance, racism, and bigotry.’

A few years ago Jens Orback, the memorably-named Minister for Democracy in Sweden stated: ‘We must be open and tolerant towards Islam and Muslims so that when we become a minority they will be so towards us.’ This descendant of the Vikings has apparently read very little of the history of Islam. Otherwise he might get some idea why the once-flourishing Christian communities of the Middle East and North Africa, like the historic Jewish communities of Arabia, somehow aren’t around any more. Already large areas of Scandinavia are no-go areas for indigenous people.

The attractiveness of Islam in the West seems at first to be incompatible with the Left’s ideology of feminism, sexuality and so on (in the latest Islam-feminist interaction, a Saudi cleric said women have one-quarter of men’s brains), but politics makes strange bedfellows. This very temporary alliance, like the Hitler-Stalin pact of 1939, has strategic advantages for both sides. They have common enemies of which Christianity is the most obvious and important, followed by the icons of patriotism – Anzac Day, the flag, Australia Day, Captain Cook, the British and Anglosphere connections, etc. Our political class gives the impression that it simply does not know what is going on in this sphere of politics or how powerful and far-reaching the influence of the adversary culture has become,

Faced with this simultaneous onslaught of Islam and the Left, the West’s political class has turned away from reality, mouthing platitudes about multiculturalism, a concept already about as discredited as it is possible to get. When they speak they are, one feels, reading from the wrong page, applying one useless nostrum after another. In Denmark, in one example among countless markers of cultural surrender, Muslim schools teaching jihad and anti-Semitism and referring to Danish people as ‘pigs’ are subsidised 75 per cent by the government.

The political class desperately repeat (‘If I tell you three times it is true!’) that Islam is a Religion of Peace and the terrorists and murderers are not true Muslims. A paradigm example is the Pope’s repeated claim that there is no such thing as Islamic terrorism. This is followed with a demand from the Vatican that the West commit suicide by admitting vastly greater numbers of Muslims, and the pronouncement that concern for ‘cultural identity’ doesn’t justify opposition to mass Muslim immigration, an opposition spurred by unjustified ‘fear of the other’. His Holiness states: ‘I won’t hide my concern in the face of the signs of intolerance, discrimination and xenophobia in Europe.’

Commentator Robert Spencer remarked sardonically: ‘Maybe people have “fear of the other” because of “the other’s” tendency to perpetrate jihad massacres, and to boast of his imminent conquest of Europe.’ Expressions like ‘the clash of civilisations’ are horrifying to progressive thought. The many xenophobic, blood-thirsty, war-mongering, anti-Semitic and misogynistic passages of the Koran are ignored or censored.

Canada’s Justin Trudeau, in a totally weird pronouncement, claims that opposition to anti-‘Islamophobic’ legislation is motivated by, of all things, sexism! Meanwhile, under Muslim pressure, the EU is boycotting Israeli celebrations for the 50th anniversary of survival and victory in the Six-Day War.

Poland and Hungary, having lived under and somehow survived a decades-long Soviet attempt to crush their cultures, seem to know better. Their leaders’ reaction to the Muslim onslaught suggests they have experienced history and the world. Some other countries are also waking up, but others, like the Scandinavian countries, seem paralysed.

Multiculturalism has appealed to many statesmen and caused them to defend it despite the evidence because it seems to make vote-buying simple and easy: pay off the boss-men in ethnic ‘communities’ and their flocks will follow them. Never mind that waves of migrants settled successfully before multiculturalism was even heard of.

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