Rod Liddle

Why I feel compelled to defend Boris

The spiteful attacks come from people fortunate enough to have been employed by him, shagged by him, or both

2 April 2016

9:00 AM

2 April 2016

9:00 AM

I got Boris Johnson into trouble once, without meaning to. The two of us had been driven hither and thither across Uganda by Unicef in the back of an expensive Mercedes 4×4 to gaze at the fatuous projects they had delivered for the benighted natives. We had been chosen for the trip because we were perceived, rightly, to be unconvinced by the efficacy of some western foreign aid programmes and even less convinced — in my case, at least — by the UN.

Our chaperones were two humourless Scandinavian women who ferried us both from one remote village to the next: ‘Look, here we have built a women’s drop-in centre,’ one of them would remark proudly of a breezeblock edifice in some pitiful settle-ment which primarily needed a road, a school, some industry etc. But the Unicef women had an agenda and the Ugandans had bloody well better get on board with it. At each village the natives would be rounded up to meet us and explain how exceptionally grateful they were.

Shortly before we arrived at every stop, the Scandi harridans would smear thick layers of insulating cream on themselves, and then don rubber gloves and face masks. They urged us to do the same — there is bilharzia here, they said, and perhaps worse — but we declined. It seemed staggeringly rude. And so that is how these matrons greeted the natives each time — stepping out of an air-conditioned limo which cost the GDP of their entire country and shaking hands encased in rubber gloves because the black people are all diseased. And then lecturing them about women’s rights.

It eclipsed satire. This seemed to me racist, patronising and as fine a case of cultural neo-imperialism as you could ever wish to find. After we left one settlement and climbed back in our limo, Boris remarked, with acid on his tongue: ‘And so on to the next bunch of grinning piccaninnies.’ It was one of the most apposite statements I have ever heard; anti-racist in its intent, mocking the attitudes of the Unicef staffers and the purpose of this charade.


I wrote about it afterwards and quoted Boris, in context. But it still got him into trouble. There is no nuance allowed. Boris is possibly the least racist person I have ever met — unsurprisingly, considering he is the esoteric product of millennia of Eurasian toff miscegenation. You could not be elected mayor of the world’s third most achingly right-on city — after Brighton and Freiburg — if ordinary people detected even a scintilla of racism in your bones.

I thought I’d bring it up again now because it seems to be open season on Boris, the date having been set by No. 10. The newspapers have been full of entertainingly spiteful attacks on the man, largely from people fortunate enough either to have been employed by Boris or shagged by him or, in Petronella Wyatt’s case, both. In fairness, Petsy attempted to disguise her attack as a sort of semi-affectionate defence.

The most stinging and bitter effusion came from our own Matthew Parris, who I have always regarded as a beautiful and elegant writer who is nonetheless wrong, always, about everything, without exception. It was remarkable in its fury, a kind of eloquent hissy fit seemingly predicated upon the fact that Boris had once referred to gay people as ‘bum boys’and voted against the repeal of Clause 28. God knows what Matthew thinks about most of the rest of his former party colleagues, then, who also voted against the repeal of Clause 28 and, when off-duty, perhaps use similar terminology or — hell, who knows — worse.

There was recycled tat about Johnson having once, when he was about nine years old, fabricated a quote for a newspaper and the old inaccurate story of him having provided his friend Darius Guppy with the address of a journalist who it was claimed had smeared the Guppy family. (Not smeared them enough, in my book.) The address was never given, a fact Matthew decided not to report.

Matthew went on to describe Johnson’s chief qualities as being: ‘casual dishonesty, the cruelty, the betrayal; and, beneath the betrayal, the emptiness of real ambition: the ambition to do anything useful with office once it is attained’. Oh, and incompetence and a lack of attention to detail.

I have to say, it seems to me a tirade which is histrionic in temperament and somewhat selective in its litany of real or imagined crimes. As well as being deeply disloyal, of course — but the referendum looms and I suppose we might consign such recondite qualities as loyalty to the dustbin for a bit. The supposedly substantive stuff is that, undoubtedly uniquely among politicians, Boris Johnson has been known to change his mind from time to time on certain issues and hasn’t always kept his promises. If we were to strike out all those in the House of Commons guilty of these misdemeanours, we would be left with Frank Field and Kate Hoey.

And then there is the incompetence and lack of a grasp of detail, which seem to be one and the same thing. This is a charge often levelled at Boris and I suppose there is some truth in it. I do not think he would make a particularly effective Chief Secretary to the Treasury, for example. But he might make a decent leader. I am not at all sure that good leaders do need the sort of grasp of fine detail to which Johnson’s critics frequently allude — which is why the undoubtedly fastidious and competent Andrew Tyrie is where he is, and why Boris Johnson is where he is.

Leaders surely need to have hold of the bigger picture, the stuff well above the fine print, the things which resonate with the public. I can’t think of many politicians who do that better than Boris Johnson. Hell, I wouldn’t vote for him — unless he was standing against his polar opposite, Jeremy Corbyn — but then, I’m not a Tory.

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Show comments
  • Rik

    I have always disliked and distrusted Bojo,seeing in him the only politician that has performed more u-turns than Cameron,a politician that never saw a bandwagon he didn’t want to jump on if it might propel his career an inch forward,i don’t trust his convictions over the referendum either.Having said that anyone so attacked by the acid queen Parris can’t be all bad.

    • Rob Harris

      Roger that.

      • Seadog

        I know what you mean but perhaps the wrong word in the circumstances.

        • MikeF

          I don’t know – roger and out.

          • Sanctimony

            Surely that’s Matthew Parris’ line ….

    • Zander1983

      Ye British dislike and distrust every politician on earth, without exception. Its a horrible consequence of years and years of taking democracy for granted. A couple of years in an islamic dictatorship would do ye the world of give and give ye some much needed perspective.

      • Frank

        Which islamic dictatorship would of course get rid of all the camp old queens cluttering up the media, parliament and the civil service!!

        • ArchiePonsonby

          Good point!

      • gelert

        Most of the British, especially the MSM, still love Obama. As Stephen Dixon proclaimed on Sky last Saturday.

        • Simerall

          Yes, the broadcasters are shameless. ITN’s hostility to Trump is pure comedy.

        • boot2

          Stephen Dixon is too naive, and pleasant, to be a newsreader on Sky.
          Way out of his depth.

          • gelert

            But, surprisingly, he has expressed his disbelief in AGW. If he’s been at the Beeb he would have been sacked for such heresy.

        • Little Black Censored

          “Most of the British, especially the MSM…”
          You need to make a distinction here.

      • Peter Grimes

        In a little over a couple of years we will be on an irreversible path to an islamic dictatorship anyway because of our having taken democracy for granted.

    • Little Black Censored

      Well, there you are then. Thanks for sharing.

  • Fencesitter

    Matthew “plaster of” Parris. Because nothing’s set in stone where he’s concerned.

  • GertrudeBell

    Rod is right, always. Or almost always.

  • Frank

    Rod, you surely cannot claim to be still Labour?

    • Edward Smith

      It’s long baffled me.

    • MikeF

      He has actually said he could not vote for Corbyn’s Labour Party. I reckon that come the next General Election he will vote UKIP.

    • Planet Vague

      or a Dan Hodges even. What happened to him?

      • Neil Ashley

        He’s been Mailed somewhere.

  • nancoise

    Boris lost me when he bought those water cannons, for use on us, the voters, when he doesn’t like our protests. They haven’t been used yet, but don’t forget: they’re there.

    • gelert

      You were one of the “protesters” who committed arson and looted ? In some countries you would have been shot and deservedly so.

      • BTejon

        Malaysia, for example as my neighbour told me

    • MikeF

      They could make him massively popular if we have a really hot summer.

      • gelert

        Even better in January.

        • Morseman

          Frozen assets?

          • gelert

            Of the brass monkey variety.

    • FriendlyFire

      Yes, violent protests which involve looting and lobbing rocks at the police are a cornerstone of democracy, aren’t they.

    • Freddythreepwood

      He lost me when he didn’t use them.

    • smithers25

      I thought a better idea was to use the type of gun used in those fun gun events in woods where you pretend to be a soldier and fire paintballs at each other. Improve the weapon so it is more accurate then load it with essence of skunk and fire at the rioting ringleaders. Not only will the others back off but sniffer dogs can track them all the way back home.

      • ArchiePonsonby

        Now, I don’t know if you’re serious, but that strikes me as not a bad idea! The only drawback I can see is that they probably wouldn’t be allowed back in their homes! Would that be a drawback?

    • BTejon

      hopefully will be used on the next rioting scum. how many of them voted I wonder?

    • Ridcully

      Keep your protests peaceful and you should be all right.

      • gunnerbear

        Unless a Police Officer decides to lash out and then say it didn’t happen…..

        • Ridcully

          Maybe, but we were referring to water cannons.

  • Neil2

    “Matthew Parris, who is nonetheless wrong, always, about everything, without exception”. You missed out odious, patronising bien pensant pillock.

  • MaxSceptic

    Boris adds to the gaiety of nations, has flair and is amusing – and that is all that is important.

    As PM he can point in the general direction (provide the ‘vision thing’) and have lots and lots of studious ministers and civil servants to make sure that the machinery of the Ship of State works properly.

    The last thing we need is (more) micro-managing PMs.

    • Mhjames

      In what direction would BoJo steer the Ship of State? We don’t know, because he doesn’t know.

      • Bristol_Boy

        Probably in the defensive zig zag pattern that ships used during the war, a case of changing direction to look after oneself!

      • MaxSceptic

        A jolly good one, I imagine 😉

        We’ll just have to keep bobbing along the best we can until some politicians of stature arise (assuming the current climate of politically correct intolerance allows such a thing ever again).

        • scott_east_anglia

          “…until some politicians of stature arise…”

          Once we are out of the EU people of stature will once again see some point in standing for Parliament.

          They are finding better things to do while it remains an ineffectual EU provincial rubber-stamp assembly.

      • richardb49

        I guess the one thing we can be sure of though, it will be in a better direction than it is now.

      • BTejon

        Even if he did a mayor (sort transport, get foreign investment, attempt to start sorting homes shortage) that would be a good start.

    • Peter Grimes

      And Boris would be unlikely to continue with the ever more mistake-prone and hapless Osborne as his Chancellor.

    • gunnerbear

      “to make sure that the machinery of the Ship of State works properly.” Hellfire….that’s a radical desire….. 🙂

  • quotes

    “that is how these matrons greeted the natives each time — stepping out of an air-conditioned limo which cost the GDP of their entire country and shaking hands encased in rubber gloves because the black people are all diseased. And then lecturing them about women’s rights.”

    You are consistently hilarious (and tragically right) Mr Liddle

    Easily my favourite columnist over the last year or so

    • Planet Vague

      ….as long as the articles are NTDWI you may be right.

  • quotes

    “Parris…a beautiful and elegant writer who is nonetheless wrong, always, about everything, without exception.”

    • St Louis

      And while never failing to be smug

      • CRSM

        A common failing among sh1rt l1fters.

    • smithers25

      Does anyone know if he now uses shampoo on his hair? He made a big thing about a few years ago; anyone else recall that?

      • Roderick

        Yes, I remember something along the lines of: not continually shampooing off the naturally occurring oils in hair restores them to their proper levels. The result must be something like a shaggy dog’s coat, I imagine.

  • goodcaptainclack

    Goodbye to the Comments BTL on the Daily Telegraph. And therefore goodbye to the Daily Telegraph. I can’t say it was always nice to know you DT but it was interesting.

    • gelert

      They did allow comments on a pro-EU paean from Mrs. Clegg. I think the Barclays are heading for Remain and a reward of peerages.

      • Edward Smith

        You say this flippantly, but I fear you may actually be right!

        We have never had such definitive proof of the corruption of our political class than that which has been exposed by this referendum campaign.

        • gelert

          No, I wasn’t. They seem to have been pro-Brexit but now seem to be veering to the other side. Dave has given out peerages for less.

          I think the Mussolini treatment would be appropriate for Dave and Gideon.

        • John Steadman

          “Frankly I would like to say Dave swing.” I’m all for seeing Dave sans cravate swing, too, Edward, but I’m glad you chose your metaphor carefully, because as I remember a certain well-loved (and sadly, prominent) leftie journalist – I’m too scared to name her – reported some wretched local Tory politician to the cops for having used, figuratively, the expression ‘stoned to death’ in relation to somebody or other he had in his sights. But I think you – and I, alas, now – will avoid this fate seeing that we have a cultural inheritance which recognises the difference between figurative expression and so-called ‘hate speech’ and do not spend our time seeking victimhood.

        • John Booth

          June 24th, Independence Day. June 25th, Cameron’s resignation day

    • Edward Smith

      They’ve gone full tabloid in layout and we don’t even get to express our pent up rage at all the nonsense they so frequently peddle.

      The Speccie is the last refuge.

      • jeffersonian

        If you feel a little high brow coming on Standpoint is excellent.

      • Michael H Kenyon

        Breitbart to stabilise the loons, as well.

      • JohnnyNorfolk

        But owned by the same peole as the DT.

        • Neil Ashley

          I gave up on the DT a couple of months ago Mr Norfolk. It’s nice to see a familiar face.

          • JohnnyNorfolk

            I read the DT both man and boy and to see it so left wing with such poor quality writing you would not believe it.

          • Neil Ashley

            Their new columnist Ian Tern might have something to do with it. He’s nice and cheap though.

      • BARROSO

        May not be to your taste but breibart has done sterling work in spilling the beans about the migrant crisis and in fighting the general narrative

      • gunnerbear

        The new layout at the DT is terrible.

      • John Booth

        And Breitbart London. Different style and a few too many noisy American cousins on there, but at least they are unafraid of PC and to print the truth.

    • Edward Smith

      The comments were the only thing which made it bearable.

    • The Active Citizen

      It really is a disaster zone. I’m struggling to imagine the sloppy minds who thought this was a good idea. Unreadable.

      Although not as highbrow as Speccie (and with an entirely different purpose) there is at least a new site soft-launched a few days ago which allows comments on each page. It’s for the EU debate, though. Here’s the link: http://facts4eu.org/

      • gelert

        Maybe a parting gift from “Psycho” ?

    • Morseman

      On the other hand…
      A relief to cease being insulted by extremely ignorant right-wing thickos.
      (Present company excluded.)

      • gelert

        The cherished myth by leftards that they are more intelligent.

        http://wmbriggs.com/post/5118/

        • Morseman

          I am happy to debate with the Leavers and Remainers, with the Pro and Contra people on various topics, but the growing custom in England of slinging insults and abuse at the other party, often without even reading and understanding the comment, has frequently turned me off.

          • Freddythreepwood

            ._. ._._.

          • Morseman

            Roger over and out to you too!

          • boot2

            Don’t get out much do you?
            There are many other parts of the British Isles where you can get insults thrown at you.

          • Morseman

            Thank you for the response.
            Yes, and that is one reason why my better half and I do not live in the UK.
            Have a nice day.

          • boot2

            Thank you, and the same to you.
            🙂

        • MikeF

          Well they often seem to be the only ones who can understand each other.

        • Planet Vague

          Well, that moron Briggs tends to probe that idea….. Cornell has very low standards I must say.

          • gelert

            As compared to that world-renowned, intellectual powerhouse that is Brock.

            Cornell ranks as 13th in the 100 best universities in the world. Brock ranks, er, nowhere.

          • Planet Vague

            Brock?

    • JohnnyNorfolk

      I have ended my subscrition to the DT. If there are no online comments what is the point.

      • post_x_it

        What’s going to happen to Igonikon Jack?

        • Neil Ashley

          It would be more pertinent to speculate on what has already happened to Igonikon Jack to make him what he is.

        • Sanctimony

          He’s been admitted to the Mayo Clinic… psychiatric unit ….

      • Sanctimony

        Good on you Squire Norfolk…. I plan to follow suit… the DT’s new internet format is quite ghastly !

      • John Booth

        Me too.

    • richardb49

      Yes I am a genuine refugee from the commentless DT, mind you I wont miss the likes of meemoe, a brit_abroad and HandofGod

      • Joey Edgecombe

        Sshh, they’ll migrate here….

    • ArchiePonsonby

      No comments allowed even on Norman Tebbitt’s article. He won’t be best pleased.

      • The_Common_Potato

        I liked the way Lord Tebbitt used to summarise – and give answers to – some comments from his previous week’s article.

        • ArchiePonsonby

          Exactly so!

    • John Booth

      And hello to Breitbart London and the Speccie

  • gelert

    Any Ugandan discussions on the trip, Rod ?

  • john

    “Why I feel compelled to defend Boris”
    Because he’s a very importent chap like I am.

  • WFC

    voted against the repeal of Clause 28

    Wasn’t Matthew Parris in Parliament when it was originally enacted?

    By the Government which he supported? Which way did he vote, I wonder?

  • NickG

    Good piece, as ever.

    Though one small bone of contention

    This seemed to me racist

    The word racist has lost its currency. Worse, it fires off the parody detector module in many normal, well informed humans. So other than in parody, general piss taking or reporting the rantings of triggered SJWs, it is best avoided and the meaning one intends conveyed using other terms.

    For example, the above quote could have been replaced with ‘This seemed to me demeaning and deeply patronising to the locals’; which would convey the required meaniung without falsly firing off the reader’s attuned parody detection module.

    • antoncheckout

      “demeaning and deeply patronising towards the locals”
      But it wasn’t, because it was an ironic quip about the Potemkin-village presentation Unicef had lined up, in a private conversation between two people touring in a car. No locals were harmed during the making of this remark. And btw ‘Piccaninni’ is the word for a child in Melanesia. If you want to go to PNG and tell them to stop using it, good luck to you.

      The only harm done was when RL published it.

      • NickG

        You’ve – ironically – missed my point completely.

        My minor gripe was with Rod’s use of the word ‘racist’, in his piece above, directed at us Speccie readers. I made no comment on the interaction between Rod and Boris in Africa, nor on the SJW pearl-clutching over Rod’s reporting of their interaction later.

        • Badger

          My interpretation is that he was highlighting the racism of people who would most likely self identify as anti-racists. I disagree with the term too, but it’s always useful to wheel it out in order to highlight the retarded attitudes of the left.

      • Sanctimony

        What would their title for Boris be ?

  • The Active Citizen

    What a fabulous piece by Rod. A joy to read on so many levels. Agree or disagree with some of the details, it improved my day.

  • Morseman

    “I am not at all sure that good leaders do need the sort of grasp of fine
    detail to which Johnson’s critics frequently allude…”

    Charge of the Light Brigade?

    A well written and interesting article. The account of the Scandinavian feminist neo-colonials is truly disturbing.

    • richardb49

      Yes but all to true bit like Jude Law going to Calais to demand the so called refugees are allowed into the UK surrounded by his bodyguards, I thought they were all Doctors and Engineers

      Spekasing if refugees I am a genuine one, fled the Telegraph after they closed off comments on all articles.

      • gelert

        Remember, one of them could find a cure for cancer.

        • richardb49

          DT Commentator ? well I guess so.

          • gelert

            I think it was Yvette Cooper talking about the “refugees”.

          • Neil Ashley

            Yes and I notice she hasn’t taken hers in yet either.

          • boot2

            I doubt that any self-respecting Gimmegrant would be able to put up with the po-faced lecturer for more than a couple of minutes!

          • gelert

            Swivel-eyed Ed would frighten any child to death.

      • Edward Smith

        Glad you survived the fallout.

        I too, am a DT refugee.

        We’re all in the same boat!

        • I am a DT refugee too…. trembling with rage and shock … why change what worked.. the new DT format looks soul less and in one’s face..

          • Edward Smith

            It’s turned into a tabloid. I wouldn’t be surprised if their subscriptions dropped sharply after things.

            The comments were the only thing that made some of the trash on their bearable!

          • richard1949

            well mine has stopped

          • licjjs

            The only reason I read a lot of the stuff was to reach the comments at the end and take part in any debate I found there. I have to admit that, on occasion, I skipped reading the article and went straight to the comment.

          • richard1949

            could not agree more it feels like a children’s publication is the best explanation I can offer.

      • smithers25

        And me! I posted this on the DT site and it was REMOVED. If this is enough to have me censored I do not feel like supporting the DT anymore.

        Reading the paper issue of todays DT I read about the new multicultural Thomas The Tank Engine friends from Brazil India etc. all with the worry about cultural stereotyping! My eyes narrow in frustration. I still have somewhere in the loft my Thomas books from 1951. I never thought of the Fat Controller as an ”imperial little white boss’ as Tracy Van Syke’s claims.
        On to the NUT page 11, ”British Values could upset migrants warn teachers’ Not half as much as telling the whole storey of some of their own cultures and past history.
        I despair!
        Then onto the more cheerful obituaries column, and Princess Joan of Sealand who has died aged 86. With her wonderful husband she bought HM Fort Roughs off the Suffolk coast, countering every attempt by British governments to control the fort Roy Bates (husband) declared UDI and founded Sealand styling his wife and self as Prince Roy and Princess Joan. They repealed boarding parties fired guns, used Molotov cocktails were summonsed and discharged because the judge said the courts had no jurisdiction. When the UK extended its territorial waters to include the fort, Bates retaliated by extending Sealands territory to include large parts of Suffolk and Essex!
        When away and invaded by a German ex businesses and a band of supporters, the Bates recaptured Sealand by sliding down ropes from a helicopter, taking a German prisoner resulting in a West German diplomat coming to secure his release!
        There is much more, please read it.
        This is what British values is about NUT. Thomas would feel proud.

      • Dacorum

        And I’m another refugee from the DT. I do wonder how much traffic and subscriptions on the DT website will drop over the next few weeks.

    • Lawrence James.

      Your last line is true: what a blessing that the Scandinavians did not have global empires.

  • James Chilton

    Rod Liddle feels compelled to defend Boris as an act of solidarity in the interests of jokers. An hilarious article though, in which Rod’s gift for satire is much in evidence.

  • toonpaddymal

    It would be interesting to know the actions Matthew Parris took to oppose the passing of Section 28. From things I’ve read before they included a mothers meeting with Mandelson and McKellan at Heaven where they bravely agreed to do something but couldn’t quite steel themselves to decide what. And organizing some kind of meeting in a basement backroom during a Tory party conference. Did he even write an article condemning it? Would public opposition have jepordized the media career he was desparate to build at the time? Alienated him from the Tory Party which was his network and badge of prestige? In short might vocal public opposition against a Bill rightly condemned by McKellan as “brutish” have cost Parris work, money, and whatever fulfillment of ambition being a media pundit might bring? Whatever the answers may be, Parris is still a spineless Europhile gerbil lodged up the jacksie of the British establishment. Howay Bozza. Howay Leave.

  • MT09

    Phew, I am relieved to see some familiar DT refugee names in here

  • Mc

    “tirade which is histrionic”. As well as wet and vacuous. He gives Hugo Rifkind a run for his money in the pseudo sage stakes. Whenever I read one of his articles, I think of a squeeling old fart dressed in a mankini, who’s being given a wedgie.

    • Mc

      After some reflection, Sathnam Sanghera is in fact the master of vacuity who makes both Rifkind & Parris look like rank amateurs.

      • Sean L

        I’ve never heard of him but to be capable of journalism more bereft of content than either Parris or Rifkind is some achievement. The two of them are the weakest contributors I’ve known in 35 years of reading this thing. Matthew Parris is remarkably fluent and readable but there’s just nothing there. I’d take Petronella Wyatt over him any day of the week as a journalist.

        • Mc

          Besides writing a “business insight” column in The Times, Sanghera seems to spend his spare time adapting classic novels to an Indian theme (just imagine the intellectual effort that requires). The basis for his alleged business expertise is the fact that he spent a year after university working for a corporate.

          Another close runner-up to these empty vessels is Justin Webb from the BBC. He seems to claim an expertise on America, due to having been BBC correspondent there for a few years. He Is blessed with sufficient IQ to achieve verbal communication, but little else.

  • Carstairs

    On the subject of Boris’s “lack of a grasp of detail” I seem to recall that one Gordon Broon was noted for his love of fine detail and desire to micro manage. That worked well.

  • grutchyngfysch

    If we were to strike out all those in the House of Commons guilty of these misdemeanours, we would be left with Frank Field and Kate Hoey.

    An entirely acceptable state of affairs, as far as I’m concerned.

    • Sean L

      Definitely.

  • Sean L

    You are a Tory mate. It’s about attitude and you show that attitude all the time. As Enoch Powell once said – and I’m not comparing you with him, no one could compare with him – when he campaigned for Labour in the 70s: “There are many good Tories on the Labour benches.” – Kate Hoey is another one. It’s a broad church but the common denominator is allegiance. Thus Powell to Thatcher when she claimed that the Falklands War was fought to defend “our values”: ‘No, we do not fight for values. I would fight for this country even if it had a communist government.’ There again, if Matthew Parris is the yard stick, who isn’t a Tory?

    • big

      the Falklands war was fought to defend Thatchers ego

  • Pioneer

    DT taking a hammering in the comments. I have been blocked from the speccie blogs, no idea why.

    • gelert

      I was blocked once because some American shill for Big Tobacco complained about me. After about six weeks I was a no longer blocked.

      During that time I set up another account as gélert which fooled the filters. Although someone did set up a twitter account in my name and used it to post anti-Semitic comments for a few hours before Disqus blocked it.

      • big

        my understanding is they have got rid of their comment section,and it wont be comming back!

        • 100

          Like the Gruniards motto

          Comment is FREE, but speech isnt.

    • Sanctimony

      Everyone worth listening to has been banned from the DT blogs… it’s all down to some ghastly feminist baggage called Kate Day, I gather… you know, one of those mohair-legged LGBT fanatics … Allegedly…

  • John Andrews

    Reagan, who seems to be the most admired American president of modern time, was famous for concentrating on the big picture and not spending much time on the details. Getting big decisions right matters more than getting little decisions right.

    • Sue Smith

      Not only that, but Reagan was a fantastic joke-teller and all round humourist – not like the latest humourless incumbent!!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mN3z3eSVG7A

    • thomas_paine2

      He was the last major world figure of an age when political figures still mattered some ; now we live in an irreverseable globalist world where individual politicians are just a fig leaf for democracy and don’t matter much.

      • big

        ….it’s,so very true ,politicians no more than the front of house staff! the real power remains behind the scenes.

  • Marketthinker

    I think it has been mentioned (but bears repeating) that Matthew Paris’ husband is/was David Cameron’s chief speech writer. Sounds like number 10 is calling in a few favours, a bit like Clarkson saying stay in Europe cos you fancy Sam Cam and the British Tabloids will act as a good discipline on EU bureaucrats

  • souptonuts

    Parris, Rudd, Fallon, Morgan, No 10’s pet attack dogs. Keep rotating ’em, juicey bones and fresh water at all times.

  • Ingmar Blessing

    The first part about those Swedish chicks in Africa is nail-bending. Why is stuff like that never on the front pages?

    Since crazy BS like that makes up several percent of Africa’s GDP this kind of disgusting abuse of government money should be in the news all the time.

    Just imagine the Africans would do that here!

    Pumping 3 digit billions (=that would be the equivalent) into hideous projects that are run by completely ignorant and ideologically driven chicks who won’t even shake hands!

    • Sean L

      And in Uganda the custom is to shake hands on meeting in every situation. When someone enters the room they’ll shake everyone’s hand, even members of their own family. In the villages, if you’re a man, women will also kneel before you as they shake your hand.

  • Social Justice Warrior

    Boris and Rod Lidl were separated at birth!

    I think they are twins, and are both Tory fascists. Maybe they share a brain

    • The Masked Marvel

      Liddle is neither Tory nor a fascist. He has other problems.

    • Tom

      Liddle what i can see is old Labour the fact he is not like the barking mad UAF for example does not make him a tory.

    • The Patriarchy

      Mr Liddle is a more authentic spokesman for the white working class than you will ever be, mush.

    • Kenny Fraser

      that would fit tory economic thinking,the “brain” ,in the interests of economy,would be a used example obtained from deceased porcine used for “entertainment” at a “bullingdon boys” night no doubt.

  • The Masked Marvel

    If nothing else, Rod highlights the ugliness in this debate that is clearly coming primarily from Remainiacs. One sincerely hopes the infighting won’t cause too much permanently damaging internal strife at No. 22 Old Queen St.

    • Mary Ann

      I get the impression that the hate comes from Brexiters , all those nasty foreigners, never mind the millions of Britons being foreigners in France and Spain, of course they don’t count, they’re British.

      • The Patriarchy

        No you don’t.

        You just like simpering from your imaginary moral high ground.

      • The Masked Marvel

        Your impression is closed-minded. The deceit and viciousness is mainly coming from Remainiacs. I’m not talking about whether you agree with points made or not, but about how so much of the Remain arguments presented – including from Cameron and his team – are dishonest, and the vitriol is coming much more from their side.

  • Badger

    “Matthew Parris, who I have always regarded as a beautiful and elegant
    writer who is nonetheless wrong, always, about everything, without
    exception.”

    I couldn’t agree more, but Fraser thinks he’s an intellectual giant, can you have a word?

    • The Patriarchy

      Interestingly Dame Professor Baroness Shirley Williams is also wrong, always, about everything, without exception. Perhaps it’s a nice old lady thing.

    • Sanctimony

      Fraser is a Scot !

      • Kenny Fraser

        REALLY? one would never have guessed,no more than guessing the name ponsonby-smythe was ENGLISH.

        • Sanctimony

          Scot = a**ehole !

    • Kenny Fraser

      WRONG Fraser!!! i would only describe johnson as an “intellectual giant” if the comparison was against an inebriated baboon.

      • thomas_paine2

        Fraser?

  • mahatmacoatmabag

    Boris doesn’t need defending , he just needs a decent hair cut before becoming the UK’s next Prime Minister after desperate Dave resigns in tears on 24/06/16

    • Sanctimony

      I don’t think he even needs a haircut… what you see and hear is what
      you get… Strewth, even in the formal picture of his Bullingdon Club days,
      he can be seen without a pair of socks… unlike Dave, who, in the same
      photograph, looked like a posturing peacock with a cucumber shoved up
      his date…

      • mahatmacoatmabag

        Ever since the SSM bill I have suspected that Dave likes things shoved up his date….. just never knew he preferred cucumbers up there which leads to the question of does he like big long ones or maybe a nice pickled one ?

        • Sarony

          Aren’t the pickled ones known as wallies? Or, perhaps, Wally’s

          • mahatmacoatmabag

            In Desperate Dave’s case it can safely said that he is a right Wally !

        • Sanctimony

          He’s pretty eclectic, is Dave… so here are a couple of the varieties I have cultivated that he might like: The Exocet, The Dominator, The Greefinger (let’s hope it’s gangrenous…), The Telegraph and the Turbo

          • mahatmacoatmabag

            Here is a good photo of smug Dave looking rather surprised its also on Google if you search for photos of him.
            http://russia-insider.com/en/politics/britain-allowed-unqualified-judge-decide-litvinenko-case-now-inquiry-report-must-be

          • Sanctimony

            Great picture… captured as he inserted the Exocet …

          • mahatmacoatmabag

            Which he had previously inserted along with an organ of his own in the head of a pig.

          • Sanctimony

            Yes, indeed, how did he get away with that… must have alienated the Jewish and Mussie vote in one stroke….

            At least Corbyn restricts his sexual fantasies to well-fatted porcine varieties that are still alive when he sates his appetites….

      • Mary Ann

        Everyone in the uniform is a posturing peacock, they think they are the bees knees, they are nothing but a load of bullies.

        • The Patriarchy

          You should see a picture of the posturing privileged dimwitted wimmin they let into Universities now.

    • Kenny Fraser

      presumably you stand with your hand inside your jacket fondling your tit,proclaiming yourself to be emperor of France as well?

      • mahatmacoatmabag

        No not in the least & its not my fault if the EU had your humour chip removed and you fail to understand the use of humour to make a political point.

    • Mary Ann

      Dave won’t be going on the 24th and Boris would make a terrible PM, although not as bad as Trump. The PM needs to be a diplomat.

    • thomas_paine2

      British politics – always folly to try to predict them ; time and time again, predictions have been proved totally wrong.
      Britain will stay an EU member – there, see! I’ll be proved wrong soon enough.

  • Kenny Fraser

    SHAGGED BY HIM????? ah! so you have had complaints from the simian enclosure in regents park zoo about him?

  • Bonkim

    The UN and UNICEF, etc, are total waste of money and these UN staff are paid far too much – will not get any work over minimum wage in Europe.

  • thomas_paine2

    Boris would not have come down on the LEAVE side unless he was confident the voters were going to vote LEAVE. What on Earth would he gain otherwise? I won’t believe we are out of the EU until we’re indeed – out !

    • Mary Ann

      It isn’t going to happen.

      • thomas_paine2

        I keep thinking the same, so you believe Dave will get his wicked way.

  • The UN has long been a dog that barks loud but every night before it’s kip, it puts it’s denchers in a fizzy glass of cleaning solution. All show and no go.

    They fail to keep the peace in missions they take aboard, they fail to uphold human rights in the Middle East and even in Turkey. A useless organisation, utterly utterly useless.

    • Ivan Ewan

      And it is the job of the UN Peacekeepers to provide the enemy with a morale boost by retreating from whatever position they ever take.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      So you have no idea about the UN.

      Let’s start with UNAIDS…

  • Sarony

    I’ve always regarded workers for UNICEF, and any relief organisations, as the true racists. They treat black and brown adults as if they are children to be patronised.

    • Alltaxationistheft

      And usually grow quite fat on it

  • Sue Smith

    This is hard-hitting and absolutely accurate!! Thank heavens for the internet!!!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZi1CMuYvBE

    • The first video is phenomenal. Thank you! The next video is private.

      • Sue Smith

        Oh, sorry about that – the second one worked when I emailed it to friends and relatives.

  • IainRMuir

    Wonder what these Scandinavian wimmin have to say about recent events much closer to home?

  • Johnny Foreigner ✓VER.Angry

    Great piece Rod. Matthew Parris, has become a bit of a Drag Queen, short on Queen, but a consummate drag, falling further and further back, as time drags on.

  • Malcolm Stevas

    I’d like to know how much we contributed to the cost of that breezeblock “women’s drop-in centre” in Uganda, to the luxury 4×4, and to the UNICEF junket as a whole. As for Boris I’m fed up with hearing about him: he might be witty and intelligent, beneath the buffoonish exterior, but BJ is no statesman, just another reminder that our political class is peopled by third-raters and has been for too long. We deserve better.

    • Rush_is_Right

      SOME of us deserve better, but most (and let’s remember that we live in a land that gave Blair three overall majorities) do not.

      • DP111

        But to our credit, we did not elect Brown – a world renowned economist.

  • mikewaller

    All this proves is that personality journalists, such as Paris and Liddle, are polemicists and, as such, of very little use in helping us make rational choices. That is why I found Charles Moore’s idiot assertion that the Governor of the Bank of England should keep out of the Brexit debate so very annoying. Week after week, Moore serves up tosh that would shame an undergraduate trying to make a political name for himself – and he wants to keep those with highly relevant expertise from contributing. The sooner we recognise stuff such as the above to be part of the entertainment industry and not a serious contribution to the debate, the better chance we have at arriving at sensible conclusions.

    • br14

      “Charles Moore’s idiot assertion that the Governor of the Bank of England should keep out of the Brexit debate”

      Hardly “idiot assertion”. He should “keep out”. But for the best of reasons.

      In the event the UK votes to leave, it would be his job to manage the fiscal fall out. He can hardly take a balanced view if he has already forecast disaster.

      The Governor of the Bank of England must be seen to be above such matters. He cannot be seen to be biased in favour of one decision or another, whatever his personal beliefs. His job is to steer the ship regardless of decisions of state.In the event of a Leave vote, he would, most likely, have to resign.

      Not because he is influential. But because the stability of the currency depends upon it. His comments were foolish in the extreme. A sensible governor would have refused to comment.

      • mikewaller

        I might agree with you if the net effect of your strategy was not to leave the nonsense of Moore et al unchallenged by expert opinion. In any event, I think your central premise falls by analogy. At the battle of Quiberon Bay, Admirable Rodney gave the command for a very hazardous manoeuvre which the Sail-Master then challenged on the grounds that it would imperil the ship. I think that Rodney’s reply has direct pertinence to the present situation: “You have done your duty in telling me; now do as I have instructed”.

        Of course, had a referendum not been invoked to settle the EU question, the Governor could just have had a quiet word with the Cabinet; but with a referendum he had no choice but to speak to the Country as a whole. It is, after all, the whole Country that has to make the decision, incompetent though many of the people to whom I have spoken, feel. To have failed to do so, given the anxieties he has, would have been a gross dereliction of duty. Of course, it could impact on the currency, but in IMHO, that is very much the lesser of two evils. The people to be blamed are the idiots like Moore who have dragged us into this sorry mess. With China now fully awake, we have entered the era about which Napoleon warned us. Only two entities have the critical mass to face the Chinese down: the USA and the EU. A brexited UK with that clown Boris at the helm just ain’t going to cut it.

        • Grandito

          The EU cannot face anyone down – it is powerless in every respect. It has no military, no seat on the security council and no ability to take economic action as demonstrated by China’s tariffs of 43% on EU steel imports with no response from the EU while a critical industry is virtually wiped out.

          To defeat the EU in any economic or diplomatic conflict, the opponent only has to divide and conquer – not hard when the EU has 28 members with different objectives. Has anyone ever felt threatened by the EU? What could the EU do if really pushed? Write a stiff letter or perhaps “complain in the strongest terms”? That’ll get the Chinese quaking in their boots I bet.

          • mikewaller

            Do keep up! The UK was one of the countries who sabotaged efforts by the EU to impose serious tariffs on China. The main reason for that is that we are absolutely desperate to make China our New Best Friend in the hope that they will invest lots of dough in the UK. So quite how you expect Brexiting to increase our capacity to face them down is quite beyond me. An EU that gets its act together, as it eventually will, could count for something; the UK as a sole trader never will. This is 2016 not 1866.

          • Grandito

            “The UK was one of the countries who sabotaged efforts by the EU to impose serious tariffs on China”. My point entirely. There will always be one or more countries that the counter-party in the negotiations will be able to apply pressure on or offer enticements to.
            The EU cannot “get its act together” as it is just a jumble of states with competing interests. An independent UK, like any independent country will always negotiate for its own best interests (in this case the government decided sacrificing the steel industry was worth while – later when it changed its mind it could do nothing about it as it is bound by the EU which it cannot pressure into quick action).

  • SonOfaGun

    Matthew Paris, on every issue, bats for the other side.

    • big

      …..hahaha i like that.

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      Batting and bowling at the same time.

    • Sanctimony

      I was told that he bowled from the gasworks end …

  • Marian Hunter

    Please read the great Paul Theroux’s Dark Star Safari. He describes these “Agents of Virtue” getting into flash 4x4cars (always white) after huge American buffet-style “power breakfasts. No breeze-block accommodation for them, no. None of the food consumed at these breakfasts get shared with the audiences of hungry children looking on, indeed arriving early just to get a good place to watch.

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      You get this in Vientiane. NGO in Toyota Landcruisers that never go up country. Which are “sold” to some local government official for a knockdown price after two years. Never give a penny to these charities as all they do is kidnap local children and pass on to wealthy families in the west. Orphans with living parents.
      Jack, Singapore

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    Test

  • Mary Barnes

    Liddle stop being a creep. It is racist to claim that Obama must hate Britain because of his Kenyan ethnic origin.

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