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Stepford students’ new target: other Stepford students

The anti-free-speech revolution is devouring its children

12 March 2016

9:00 AM

12 March 2016

9:00 AM

In 1793, on the eve of the Terror in France, the royalist journalist Mallet du Pan coined the adage ‘The Revolution devours its children.’ Today, on the left, history is repeating itself as farce. In universities, childish pseudo-revolutionaries are devouring their elders and self-styled radical betters.

Last week, student activists at Columbia University in New York mounted a concerted campaign against that notorious neo-fascist puppet Pinocchio. A big blow-up Pinocchio doll had starred in a display by Students Supporting Israel, staged as a counter demo to a fun-sounding campus festival called ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’.

Presumably his role was to suggest that the pro-Palestinian students were telling porkies and their noses should grow. After these opponents protested, the university authorities removed Pinocchio — purely, of course, as a ‘safety’ measure, the new all-purpose excuse for political censorship.

But why pick on Pinocchio? Because, the anti-Israeli lobby insisted, the inflatable constituted ‘an explicitly and overtly anti-Semitic image’. A group of Jewish American students was censored because they were accused of, er, anti-Semitism.

Barely a week goes by without similar student-eat-student lunacy. Campuses are becoming ‘intersectional’ war zones, where identity zealots compete to see who can appear the most offended and victimised and so silence the rest.

In British universities, a rising ride of intolerance sweeps away anything that might make students feel uncomfortable. A leading anti-fascist campaigner has been ‘no-platformed’ by the NUS black students’ group, who branded him ‘Islamophobic’. The NUS lesbian, gay, bi- and transsexual officer refused to share a platform with Peter Tatchell, doyen of LGBT lobbyists, because he had opposed bans on Terfs (‘trans-exclusionary radical feminists’). After standing up for free speech, it seems, the likes of Tatchell must be denied the right to speak on -campus.

Over a year ago, Brendan O’Neill introduced Spectator readers to this new breed of super-squeamish, censorious student. The Stepford students, as Brendan called them, might ‘look like students, dress like students, smell like students. But their student brains have been replaced by brains bereft of critical faculties and programmed to conform.’


Since Brendan’s piece came out, things have got worse. Some Cambridge undergraduates set up a website ironically called the Stepford Student, intending to show that they didn’t fit the stereotype. Before too long they surrendered and closed it down — because of protests from real Stepford students outraged by tongue-in-cheek articles such as ‘Am I only a feminist to get laid?’ which showed a ‘flippant and harmful attitude towards feminism’. Feminism is never a laughing matter and flippancy equals heresy.

The ‘Rhodes must fall’ campaign, demanding the removal of the Victorian imperialist’s statue from an Oxford college because it made students feel ‘unsafe’, has been reportedly superseded by a move to bring down a statue of Queen Victoria at Royal Holloway, in London, because she was ‘implicitly involved in colonial exploits’. The reports were later denied – but it was widely reported in the press because it was so believable. It fits a relentlessly depressing trend.

Just last month at the London School of Economics, freedom-loving students formed the LSESU Speakeasy to defend free speech. The immediate response of some student activists was to demand that the union -disband this offensive society. Not only is it unacceptable to speak your mind, it seems even using the F word — freedom — risks a possible ban.

The recent UK cases of student upstarts trying to censor their radical forebears has caused consternation that we may have reached ‘peak lunacy’. What, everybody wants to know, is wrong with these students?

Wrong question. Far from springing from nowhere, these millennial students are only the militant, provisional wing of a crusade for conformism — banner slogan: ‘You can’t say that!’ — infiltrating our culture from the top downwards. They are the youthful vanguard of a movement I call the reverse Voltaires, whose cri de coeur is ‘I know I will despise what you say, and I’ll fight to the end of free speech for my right to stop you saying it!’

The campus censorship crusade is not craziness so much as a logical extension of the ‘no platform’ policy so beloved of the left. This dates back to the ‘no platform for racists and fascists’ policy adopted by the National Union of Students in 1974. Today it seems more like ‘no platform for racists, fascists, Islamists, Islamophobes, homophobes, Nietzsche, rugger-buggers, pin-ups, rude pop songs, sombreros, sexist comedians, transphobic feminists, Cecil Rhodes or anything at all that might make anybody feel uncomfortable’.

Even back in the day, some of us opposed the NUS policy. It confused shutting down your opponents with winning an argument. It denied everybody else the right to hear and judge for themselves. And by making free speech a privilege rather than a right, it opened the door to banning any views -outside the prevailing orthodoxy.

At its 1977 conference, the outgoing Labour general secretary of the NUS was already criticising students’ unions which ‘no-platformed’ members ‘whose views the majority of members do not like. This kind of thought control is no part of a democratic students’ union.’

‘No platform’ now means no argument. The frequent allegations of ‘homo/trans/Islamophobia’ give the game away. To brand opinions you don’t like as ‘phobic’ means damning them as symptoms of a psychiatric disorder. And there is no point debating with irrational and dangerous ‘phobics’. Far better to muzzle and quarantine them.

Stalin’s Soviet regime was keen on accusing its political critics of mental health prob-lems and shutting them in psychiatric wards. But while there is a whiff of Stalinism about the Stepford students, they are more like enthusiastic young Maoists — the youthful Red Guards who denounced their elders and teachers for failing to toe the line, and smashed up China’s cultural monuments, Isis-style.

The irony is that many throwing up hands in horror at today’s promiscuous ‘no platform’ antics have themselves tried to ban speech of which they disapproved. It will come as little surprise to those with a sense of history that among the latest ‘victims’ of ‘no platform’ are those who demanded campus censorship in the past, up to and including St Peter of Tatchell. Those who live by the ban can perish by it, too.

Mick Hume is the author of Trigger Warning: Is the Fear of being Offensive Killing Free Speech?

You might disagree with half of it, but you’ll enjoy reading all of it. Try your first 10 weeks for just $10


Show comments
  • E.I.Cronin

    Conscription – it’s the only solution. For girls too. They’ll be too busy running marathons in combat gear to obsess about their cisses.

    • Sue Smith

      They have it in Switzerland, despite not having fought wars for decades!! We could all use a dose of what the Swiss have for whatever ails us.

      • E.I.Cronin

        1000+. Army service teaches discipline and respect.

        I have family in Switzerland and while they have some criticisms of their system they do look back home and see what a degraded, counterfeit democracy we have. I wish the IPA would start lobbying for a constitution on the Swiss model and really push Govt to take a razor to the progressive establishment in education. In the right hands education could be something brilliant.

        • vieuxceps2

          Surely,Cronin, you’re not suggesting that there’s something amiss with our education system….?

          • E.I.Cronin

            Apart from the pc-on-steriods curriculum; teachers who wouldn’t be out of place in the Khmer Rouge or Komsomol and students who will probably stage public executions for microaggressions in a few years it’s just about perfect! 🙂

            It all went haywire when we stopped caning them.

    • JohnJ

      Agree 100%. Military service. 6 months minimum full time or two years part time. Puts a lot of problems into perspective.

      • E.I.Cronin

        John I couldn’t agree more. You can always spot the difference between young army cadets and other yoof. There’s a decent, upright and respectful quality there you don’t see in the others. Humanities faculties are now hothouses for every known ideological perversion. Hate to use socialist lingo but unfortunately the institutions do need a major purge and a long stint of useful service to society.

        • Alex Cockell

          I trust that as I did a stint in St John Ambulance – I’d be exempt – as I am now in my 40s…

          • E.I.Cronin

            Ha. OK, well as Ambos perform a noble service you’re exempt. Depending on who you vote for of course 🙂

  • Hippograd

    Mick has obviously been heavily influenced by Brendan O’Neill. Or is it vice versa? Either way, there’s a simple solution to the problem that occupies them both:

    Open Britain’s borders to the Third World and let a thousand flowers of libertarianism bloom!

  • MrKaplan

    Today in the guardian: “The view from Generation Y: why all today’s Opinion pieces are by millennials”

    Err, because they’re the ones who have been brainwashed by the liberals to only think and say all the “right” things. Anyone else with a difference of opinion is No Platformed, shouted down, censored, accused of an “ism” or a “phibia”, that’s why! Maybe suspended from their job, made a pariah…

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Ah yes, people haven’t been taught enough hate, as you engage in PC bigotry…

  • Duke_Bouvier

    Just on a point of detail – Peter Tatchell has been pretty sound on free speech for quite a long time. If he was unsound back in the day (which I don’t remember) he has very much atoned

    • Freddythreepwood

      He became sound when he got his way.

      • justejudexultionis

        No. Tatchell has integrity, and more guts than almost anybody posting here.

    • Robbydot1

      Fine, but you can’t put the Genie back in the bottle and his ilk let it out.

      • vieuxceps2

        Yes, Comrade Tatchell was anxious enough to shout opponents down and now suffers his own tactics. Nemesis.

  • putin

    Reminds me more of the Red Guards in China from 1966-76 who were particularly brutal in attacking their teachers and professors, causing most schools and universities to be shut down. Although the label is new, the phenomena of “virtue signalling” is not. Wherever there is a group ideology and social approval is sought (e.g. socialists, feminists, ISIS) it inevitably becomes an arms race to see who is the better ideologue. Much harm is caused and it eventually it leads to the ridiculous extremes we are now witnessing. I wonder where it will end.

    • E.I.Cronin

      ”one group of students killed their teacher and ate his liver.”
      I like it! Mallet Du Pan’s adage taken literally. Considering the baby-boomer academics began this progressive descent into madness there’s a nice symmetry.

      • Sue Smith

        As only understood by a Kiwi!!!

        • E.I.Cronin

          Now, now Sue… next you’ll be making sheep jokes! We deport people for less 🙂

          • Sue Smith

            To Australia, I’ll bet!!!!!!!!!!

    • Simon Fay

      Shame they can’t all be locked in a hangar together, lured there on the pretext of some SJW Stopping-Fascism-Once-&-For-All rally, and the doors locked until they have wiped each other out, leaving the rest of us with a glut of cheap pet-food.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Yea, how dare the 99.99%…

        The BNP, less extreme, got 1667 votes.

    • Hippograd

      And some cultures are much more inclined to socialism and collectivism than others. Which is presumably why Mick Hume and Brendan O’Neill are so eager to open the borders to the libertarians and individualists of the Third World, which has a long, long tradition of free speech.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Ah, the idea of natural inferiority of the Blacks, check.

        • Hippograd

          But surely if a culture is inclined to socialism and collectivism it is superior, not inferior?

          Ah, the idea of natural inferiority of the Blacks, check.

          I assume that when Israel was giving contraceptive shots to the Falashim, it was because Israel didn’t want too much of a good thing.

          Growing up in Israel, Shay Sium became accustomed to being called a[n] “n-word”. Sium, 32, has lived in Israel most of his life, but says he and other Ethiopian Jews are treated differently from other Israelis: factories do not want to employ them; landlords refuse them; and certain schools turn away their children.

          http://www.irinnews.org/report/94819/tribulations-being-ethiopian-jew

    • vieuxceps2

      Comes the revolution we’ll all have liver for breakfast.

  • In short, they have sown the wind and reaped the whirlwind. Perhaps there’s something wrong with the concept of government-funded education.

  • No Man’s Land

    So end all ‘liberal’ middle class leftist vogues, they always end up turning on each other. Give it ten years and we won’t remember what a Stepford Student is. Word of warning though: they don’t stay dead.

  • Bluesman_1

    Stepford or Midwich?

  • Michael H Kenyon

    Might the Stepford students be the dregs of the remaining social scientists and their hangers-on/ wannabes in STEM showing off/ others playing victim for whatever benefit it still provides, and those lucky academics insufficiently cowed by the demands of the REF? I do suspect that if their subsidising is cut off, so will the ”protest’.

  • TrulyDisqusted

    Isn’t part of the problem caused by the commercialisation of and political interference in our universities?

    If every student is now a paying customer – and the customer knows best, then universities are pressured into seriously considering the demands of the minority, but vocal agitators.

    This has been further exasperated by the quota system that demands that universities must open their doors to certain groups, often at reduced cost/no cost and even if they haven’t attained the academic qualifications for entry.

    The belief is that if you can surround these academically un-gifted “students” with the brilliant minds of the bonafide students who earned their place, that brilliance will rub off and the academically un-gifted will magically raise themselves to a higher level.

    Whilst this is sometimes true, the problems arise when due to commercial considerations and the quota system, universities are pressured to admit ever greater numbers of academically un-gifted students who instead of mixing with the brilliant young minds who may lift them up, seek out each other only to demonstrate (loudly) how academically un-gifted they are and as a result, drag the good name of Great institutions down to their level.

    We see exactly the same pattern in wider society where mass immigration means migrants no longer need to integrate, but simply seek other migrants just like them then vocally demonstrate against the host nation.

    And this we are told is Progress?

    • Sue Smith

      You have absolutely nailed it 100%. “The customer knows best” is an oldie but a goodie.

      Too many junkets, quangos, government dependents, human rights and discrimination gravy trains. We are seeing this all out of control. For now. When the steam train, fuelled by the pound, runs out of puff make sure you are the first one to see it coming!! Then act.

      That’s what I’ve said to one of my sons, who works in our federal government close to the absolute top as a media adviser. I’ve said “when it looks like turning sour make sure you’re the first one to get to the door”! A general election is coming and my son may have to keep an eye on that door. Jumping before everybody else means you’re not all chasing the same job at the same time. It’s risky, but so is hanging around to watch the big bang.

    • vieuxceps2

      I agree with what you say but I do balk at the term “academically ungifted”. Such circumlocutions are only needed because of PC regulations You mean of course not clever enough but one mustn’t say so , must one?

  • Freddythreepwood

    I used to think only the select few, the future rulers, the movers and shakers, got to go to Oxbridge. I used to believe that these students were carefully selected. Now I wonder who is selecting them. Having a degree from these places will soon be a millstone round their necks, rather than the key to a bright future. Who will want to employ them?

    • justejudexultionis

      I doubt having a degree from Oxford or Cambridge will prove a millstone around anybody’s neck anytime soon.

      • Sue Smith

        Agreed. It’s the rest who’ll be surplus to requirements.

    • Sue Smith

      Nobody very much, if Niall Ferguson is right. His book “The Great Degeneration: How Institutions Decay and Economies Die” stately clearly that the west now exists in what he calls the “Stationery State”. Sclerotic economies, lack of social cohesion, huge welfare bills and a culture of victimhood make it certain the good times are gone.

  • Tim Gilling

    I appreciate that Spectator contributors love to clutch their pearls over this phenomenon but how big a problem is it? The students I meet are almost universally apolitical. They have none of the radicalism of their predecessors. It’s rather depressing in a way but that’s offset by their charm – again in comparison to their forbears. I suspect we’re talking about a tiny but vocal minority who are click bait to a certain type of commentator – one who has column inches to fill. (What is the Spectator equivalent of Guardianista?)

    • Freddy Bin Yusuf

      I think the focus on students is mistake, these lunatics are embedded throughout the tech and media industry now. Look at the open source programming community, currently in dire straits as these people appoint themselves “diversity officers” and purge people from projects based on what they have said on social media. These projects often contribute to the greater good of us all.

      Another good example is Twitter has appointed a “Trust and Safety Council” to police Twitter. This Trust and Safety Council is populated by what amounts to ex-Stepford Students i.e those whose gender studies degrees means they forgo meaningful employment, and survive as the professionally offended and self-appointed social media commissars.

      The first act of this Trust and Safety Council was to ban individuals who have said nasty things about the members, mainly right wing US commentators and journalists.

      • Sue Smith

        Freddy, there’s nothing new about fascism and authoritarian; the modern equivalent of which you speak is no different. They just imagine themselves better and more enlightened than anybody else. Time to call it and them out.

    • Penny

      I can’t say I meet many students, but I would be surprised if most were Stepford types. That said, it is not the case that you need a majority to support – or even be interesed – in an issue to create a change.

      • Sue Smith

        Yes, your last sentence is a disturbing reality. Look at the Bolsheviks!!

        • Penny

          True enough, Sue – but although there are plenty of political examples in history, I think you need only consider in-group / out-group dynamics to see that any situation can be dominated and bring about changes without the majority agreeing to or wanting it.

          Terms used today to silence debate have not been brought about by the majority either. But they’ve had an effect at every level – including our political classes who have to pick and choose their words very carefully. The thing is, with their fear-of-offence, on-message, soundbite stuff, they’re mentally addressing the offence-mining minority – which may be why they lose some support from the majority

          • vieuxceps2

            I fear the Big Weapon in the armoury of the activists today has been swallowed whole by the people.. PC speech now controls what we say and leads in turn to controlling what we think. We need ,as individuals, ro resist it in all its forms,including the use of terms now held to be offensive.
            The proponents of such PC shackles have had no such qualms about what was once foul language being freely piped into our homes,with the result of neutralising its effect. Why should that not be the case with “ethnic” terms.? Should not freedom of speech mean exactly what it says?

          • Leon Wolfeson

            No, the NSDAP were not a majority, for instance, as you complain about society.

      • vieuxceps2

        No, unfortunately. Today it is the minority which wins. See the bronze cockerel and the white Hamlet. Or gay marriage or PC language, No need for a democratic majority, just throw a minority tantrum and all shall be yours, especially if you’re ethnic, female or gay.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        So you make assumptions based on your fantasies, and yes there are coup scenarios…

        • Penny

          Leon – reading your one-line, hit-and-run comments, and the interpretations you appear to make of readers’ views, I rather think “assumptions based on fantasy” is your forte.

    • grimm

      You get a small minority who try to hijack lectures and turn them into political debates. They despise the other students as privileged, complacent and politically unaware. They exude moral righteousness and are driven by a revolutionary zeal to “bring about change”. This has never been a question of ALL students (or even students generally) becoming Stepford students.

      If you imagine they will grow out of it you are mistaken. These “firebrands” (as they love to call themselves) will go on to establish careers in the public domain where they will use their positions to “bring about change”.

      Never underestimate the euphoric power of moral superiority. For some people it’s like an addictive drug.

      • Sue Smith

        You make a lot of sense, but while-ever somebody else has the cash and makes all the money these twirps will be reduced to talking in an echo chamber.

        • vieuxceps2

          “while-ever”- very useful word. Australian?

          • Sue Smith

            An oldie, but a goodie. I’ve used it for decades.

      • vieuxceps2

        “the euphoric power of moral superiority”- Yes! THAT’S why I dislike lefties.

        • Penny Henry

          And Islamists.

    • justejudexultionis

      Hatred of Israel (and Jews in general) is alive and well in British universities today. The Salafist-Palestinian propaganda machine has proved highly effective in brainwashing tens of thousands of politically naive bourgeois leftists.

      • Maureen Fisher

        It’s rampant in all the “post colonial” studies where the victim ideology of Edward Said is prominent.

    • Sue Smith

      In answer to your parenthetic question “a good set of cultured pearls” – yes please, and with the emphasis on the “cultured”. They’ll probably set you back many thousands of pounds.

      Without these, we’ll have to settle for the cheaper Spectator nacre, er, I mean culture.

    • Duke_Bouvier

      To give a specific example – students at Cambridge pre-emptively cancelling an ‘around the world in 80 drinks’ party (a very standard event in times past) for fear that – for example – vague references to sombreros and tequila, or whatever would lead to disciplinary sanctions.

  • Dr. Heath

    I see no evidence that today’s students’ brains have been replaced with models that are more likely to conform than in the past. There is no ‘new breed’ of students. They belong to the same species of opinionated pillock that’s always been found wandering around campuses. Fascism, one of many ways people have of expressing their Inner Imbecile, will always be popular with large sections of any society, students included.

    • Sue Smith

      And then they go into the ‘workforce’ (those who aren’t taken up in government junkets, that is) and they become very dissatisfied because employers don’t value them nearly as much as they do themselves. And they’re not paid enough to justify their, um, ‘studies’.

      Of course, SOME of them will actually grow up!!

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Some of them will be sent to jail for crimes? Yes, child-hater.

        As you whine hate at British education, and those evil nurses and teachers.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Well yes on students, but the Fash have always a tiny minority…

  • Sean L

    Yes if Nietzsche were writing today he couldn’t be published: the casual racism, and not not so casual sexism (“don’t forget your whip!”), to say nothing of the ablism or disablism, his interpretation of all values as bodily emanations, the outward form of ultimately physiological phenomena, his contempt for the weak and ill-constituted, would certainly have him banned from campus. As for his contrast between the “blond beast” and inferior darker types in Genealogy of Morals, and that’s just in a European context – well, people get locked up for less. The man is off the scale right wing. He was even a proponent of child labour, opposing a measure to reduce the working day from 11 hours for 12 year olds in Basel where he was a professor. Cecil Rhodes is liberal in comparison. Yet his books are on the university syllabus, and of course a joy to read…

  • TrippingDwarves

    Long gone are the days when students went to university to study. Now they are simply there to emote, for emotion trumps knowledge in every case. Thank you, cultural Marxism, you have rotted the system from the core.

    • Sue Smith

      Of course, there are people who go into science, technology and medicine. These people are just too busy studying to engage in campus rubbish – aside from the occasional beer!!

      • Mr B J Mann

        You obviously haven’t heard of the UK’s junior and student doctor’s strikes!

        They complain about the hours that they have to put in, but still have time to sit on the junior doctors’ committee of the BMA and organise walk-outs?!?!?

        BECAUSE PATIENT SAFETY IS BEING COMPROMISED!

        And because they care so much about their patients, it’s not about the money, honestly, if the government doesn’t surrender, they are all going to Australia because the pay is better there?!?!?!

      • trobrianders

        I’m afraid science, technology and medicine has not been immune to the new fascism.

  • MikePage

    True freedom is realizing you don’t need to impress anyone.

    • Sue Smith

      Mmmm. Yes and no.

    • Duke_Bouvier

      True freedom also requires that you ACTUALLY not need to impress anyone.

  • justejudexultionis

    This merely confirms what Pascal said about people in universities – arrogant, self-regarding and lacking the ordinary milk of human kindness. Given the kind of the atheist/materialist drivel being manufactured in western universities today, is it any wonder that western society is in such a state of abject decline?

    FIDES QUAERENS INTELLECTUM
    SOLI DEO GLORIA

    • enoch arden

      The main problem is they now do not learn a damn $hit. Busy with other kind of activity. Their mathematics level is appalling. A generation of easy-riders and social parasites.

  • Sue Smith

    What this actually tells me is that UN-LEARNING is now a function of universities; enrol and imbibe what we teach and and then STOP THINKING for yourselves. Sad little people. And they’ll get smaller simply by virtue of the fact that everyone else around them will continue to GROW.

    • trobrianders

      That’s why they detest blue collar types whose intellects have not had sophistication and nuance ironed out of them by loonyversities.

  • trobrianders

    Even brownshirts of the 1930s had more self-awareness than the inverted fascists our loonyversities are churning out.

  • The Patriarchy

    The Rhodes statue experience at Oriel points the way to a simple solution.

    Colleges and the soapy old lefties who run them can give in to the yowling little fascists as often as they please – but in that case all public money is cut off. So our awful universities can exercise real choice : maintain freedom of speech and outlaw bullying; or starve.

    That should concentrate minds.

  • Maureen Fisher

    I see these thugs have gone on the rampage and prevented Trump from holding a rally.

  • Adaadat

    It is ironic, but the way to confront – not silence – these people, may be to take a leaf out of Oriel College’s book – not their initial genuflection to these imbeciles, but how the college is funded. It is only the work of those who hold the purse strings that forced the authorities to find some back-bone. Isn’t the lesson to privatise our tertiary education establishments?

  • JJD

    It’s not like there isn’t a line. There is. For example, I fully support universities who no-platform Islamists. The problem is that student union types often draw the line far too closely around their own very specific set of views.

    Martin Luther identified the doctrine of justification as the doctrine “on which the Church stands or falls”. Even today, there *are* some beliefs like that, which absolutely do not admit even of discussion; but not every belief can be. That’s the mistake of the ‘Stepford Students’: virtually every belief has become a belief on which things stand or fall. Thus Germaine Greer gets no platformed for having a certain view on trans people. Thus Brendan O’Neil himself, if I recall correctly, along with Tim Stanley, gets no platformed for daring, as a man, to speak publicly about abortion.

    • MC

      The actual JC saying is “He who is not against us, is for us” A very different emphasis.

      Also, there is no need for any lines in debate. The fundamentals of free speech in a debate are sacred. If you silence debate, you are merely afraid of the debate. If you can debate against those you disagree and win, you win the rights to power. If you censor in debate, you have no rights to any power.

      • JJD

        JC said both versions, in fact.

        It is reasonable to draw a line, though. If my organization is having an event where a question will be debated from different points of view, I’m not going to invite a representative of ISIS, for instance. Some things are beyond the pale, and some people should not even be invited to the table. It is ridiculous to listen to, and answer, the arguments of ISIS representatives. To do so would accord to them a dignity they do not deserve.

        • MC

          The BBC has invited extremist supporters such as Cage on the news many times, but when they’ve done they gave Cage an easy time – no hard questions. Yet even then, their idiocy shines brightly to anyone who isn’t a fanatic.
          If an ISIS vocalist was invited to a debate, they need to be heard. It is easier to attack idiots when you hear them first hand.

          • JJD

            I think you’d be in a minority there. I think most people, if they saw Anjem Choudary on a BBC Question Time panel, would think “Has the BBC completely lost its mind?” Not “Oh good, now we’ll get to hear how stupid he really is.”

  • Patricia

    “In British universities, a rising ride of intolerance sweeps away anything that might make students feel uncomfortable”

    I have a phrase for their precious behaviour – “Ivory tower fever”

  • styants64

    I am dyslexic all books all written words should be banned they are prejudiced against dyslexia, people should only get information from voice apps and use spell checker the holy Trinity for me is Cortana Google and Siri.

    • Tamerlane

      Sya gaain?

      • Father Todd Unctious

        Tuter wtat.

        • Tamerlane

          Idnede.

          • Father Todd Unctious

            Is this Afrikaans?

          • Tehy

            Yuo aer dbum

  • If you changed the T shirt to “we hate Muslims” it would be a good picture of the Spectator.

  • Tamerlane

    Not to worry, they’ll soon be stacking supermarket shelves with their second rate Desmonds…then they can really eat cake.

    • Jack Rocks

      I know 1 person from my old Uni who got a Desmond. It’s almost easier to get an Attila or Hurst than that. Strange but true.

    • Mary Woll

      Or they will shape society into the nightmare we will have to live in.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Ah yes, you’ll deny people jobs unless they have your political views.

      • Father Todd Unctious

        He is such an opinionated oaf.

      • Tehy

        Insofar as he says nothing of the sort, I’m curious where you got that?

        Never mind, you got it from your desire to win by lying about what the other guy said. So many people in the internet don’t understand that this is impossible…

        • Leon Wolfeson

          So you deny his post, as you blame me, Mr. Impossible for your posts.

          Your propaganda is alive and clearly – but in fact, what did he say?

          “They aren’t worth hiring because they will just start calling you racist, sexist, or whatever and than sue you.”

          So…he actually won’t hire people unless they’re White Male, which is flat-out illegal. (discrimination on political views is legal).

          • Tehy

            Where did he say that?

            Hint: You cannot just make up things people said, this is the internet. Sorry if that inconveniences you D:

          • Leon Wolfeson

            It’s not an issue for me, thanks. But plenty of people do, as you do – as you deny his post over and over.

            “His” of course, obvious is obvious.

            Here’s the factual quote again; “”They aren’t worth hiring because they will just start calling you racist, sexist, or whatever and than sue you.”

            Right.
            Or are you arguing with UK law on allowing discrimination on politics? It’s not a protected characteristic.

          • Tehy

            And this quote is…where, precisely?

          • Leon Wolfeson

            So you refuse to read the thread, check.

            Are you proposing to pay research rates?

          • Tehy

            No, it seems you were replying to the other gentleman. How annoying.

            Still, he’s not entirely wrong – an unscrupulous person can easily cause you far more trouble if they are a minority or protected group than if not. It’s not to tar them all, but some may wish to avoid such accusations entirely.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            You decided to intervene, Mr. Annoying, and deny his views.

            And you support illegal hiring practices, check, as you do in fact engage in very broad PC bigotry.
            (And then there’s non-visible minorities, like people with mental health issues…)

            In fact, you could try following the law. Works well.

          • Tehy

            I really don’t mind being against ridiculous laws.

            This isn’t ‘PC bigotry’. It’s a simple fact that a minority can cause you much more trouble than a white person. But in your opinion, factoring in facts is racist. Don’t like my calculation? Then stop allowing people to cry ‘racism’ for everything.

      • Roman

        They aren’t worth hiring because they will just start calling you racist, sexist, or whatever and than sue you.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Ah, so unless they’re White Male they’re not worth it, got it.

          Good to know your hiring practices are illegal due to your bigotry.

          • Roman

            So all minorities and women hold the same radical left SJW views that employers should avoid? Talk about stereotyping.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Nope, that’s your sterotyping and not mine.
            I’m advocating following the law.

          • Roman

            Would you hire someone with the disposition and history to falsely call you racist or sexist and post your personal info all over the internet?

          • Leon Wolfeson

            I would base my hiring on UK law. I would not follow your arrantly illegal prior suggestions, as you now try and make it personal.

            Well so – why do you hate UK hiring law (and minorities) that much? As you double down…

          • Roman

            Stop asking irrelevant questions. Not wanting to hire SJWs (who are mostly white by the way) who are a liability to my business and career does not violate any law. It is a sound logical decision based on taking into account the relevant risks and deciding some risks aren’t worth taking.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Ah yes, stop using facts. As you ignore the fact the statement was about minorities…as you try and discriminate based on fantasies about SJW’s… the “risk” of not following the law means you really, really shouldn’t be the one doing hiring that’s clear.

          • Roman

            The facts are clear. SJWs want to fire you. Don’t believe me? They have a whole website dedicated to it: http://racistsgettingfired.tumblr.com/

          • Leon Wolfeson

            SJW’s are idiots who want to fire everyone, and?
            But no, I’m not you and that particular one? Nope.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            (As a note, SJW’s have *entirely* different reasons than racism to hate me, not least a satirical anti-SJW flash game)

    • Father Todd Unctious

      You are colossal fool. Your anti-intellectusl agenda is so trite.

      • Tamerlane

        Did you not get the gig at Tesco’s? Never mind, there’s Lidl, Aldi, Waitrose (probs a little too upper crust for you Waities if I’m honest, they don’t employ riff raff there you know), Sainsbury’s…plenty more fish in the sea as it were. Good luck.

        • Father Todd Unctious

          What?

  • Cyril Sneer

    Let them eat their own.

  • Philsopinion

    But the truth is these Stepford students exist because of the dross they imbibe from their LECTURERS.

    THAT is where the real rot is.

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