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Books

Was King James I murdered or merely poisoned in error?

Alastair Bellany and Thomas Cogswell revisit a very cold case and suggest that the Duke of Buckingham may have made a fatal mistake

5 December 2015

9:00 AM

5 December 2015

9:00 AM

The Murder of King James I Alastair Bellany and Thomas Cogswell

Yale, pp.416, £30, ISBN: 9780300214963

Beware hedonists bearing white powder. This, in part, was the message pressed in a short book about the excesses of the Jacobean court written by a Scottish Catholic physician and occasional counterfeiter, George Eglisham. The Forerunner of Revenge, published in Antwerp in 1626 in English and Latin, quickly gained notoriety across Europe for its particular depiction of the Stuart monarchy as a dynasty under siege.

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Available from the Spectator Bookshop, £25.50, Tel: 08430 600033. Marcus Nevitt is senior lecturer in Renaissance Literature at the University of Sheffield. 

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