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Features

Through terror and scandal, the joy of sport endures

The attack on the Stade de France – and the Wembley friendly that followed – reminded us of sport’s true glory and beauty

21 November 2015

9:00 AM

21 November 2015

9:00 AM

Ain’t it rum? Last week sport was morally bankrupt, finished, no longer worthy of taking up an intelligent person’s time for a single minute. This week it’s shining out as one of the glories of the human spirit. And yet sport can cope with the contradiction quite effortlessly.

It’s hard to know the worst thing in athletics right now, but it’s either the fact that Russia has been implicated in a state-run doping programme or the possibility that the former president of the sport’s world governing body is accused of taking bribes to cover it up.

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Simon Barnes is a former chief sports writer of the Times and the author of A Book of Heroes: Or a Sporting Half-Century.

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