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Books

There is good in every tree, says Thomas Pakenham — even the sycamore

Pakenham’s latest book sees him mourn the loss of his trees from disease or storm damage as though they were close friends

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

The Company of Trees: A Year in a Lifetime’s Quest Thomas Pakenham

Weidenfeld, pp.224, £30, ISBN: 9780297866244

I have never written much about the one-acre shaw of native trees I planted in 1994, even though it is the delight of my heart, especially when the wild cherries flame in autumn. That’s because I am well aware that en masse tree-planting is a niche activity, open only to the fortunate few.

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Available from the Spectator Bookshop, £27 Tel: 08430 600033. Ursula Buchan is a former Spectator gardening columnist; her books include The English Garden, Back to the Garden and A Green and Pleasant Land.

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