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Lead book review

At last: a calm, definitive account of the Armenian genocide

On the centenary of the Armenian genocide, Justin Marozzi is appalled by how this great catastrophe has been almost entirely buried, through neglect or denial, until now

18 April 2015

9:00 AM

18 April 2015

9:00 AM

They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide Ronald Grigor Suny

Princeton, pp.520, £24.95

Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks in the Shadow of Genocide Thomas de Waal

OUP, pp.259, £20

For most of us, the centenary of the Great War means recalling the misery and sacrifices of the Western Front: Ypres, the Marne, Arras, Verdun, Passchendaele, the Somme. Few of us give as much thought to the Eastern Front and, apart from regular studies of the ever-popular, self-mythologising Lawrence of Arabia, fewer still dwell on the first world war in the Middle East.

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'They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else', £21.95 and 'Great Catastrophe', £18 are available from the Spectator Bookshop, Tel: 08430 600033. Justin Marozzi is the author of Baghdad: City of Peace, City of Blood.

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