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Culture studies

Why are students of curation being taught to ignore the public and be suspicious of enterprise?

Mark Irving laments how students of curation start off as lively citizens of the world and end up as dulled parrots of ideological cant

22 November 2014

9:00 AM

22 November 2014

9:00 AM

The world exists and then it disappears, piece by piece, the gaps widening until one age is replaced by another, leaving only fragments of the past. With luck, these pass through the hands of curious collectors dedicated to bridging the gaps formed by the desecrations of time, before reaching a terminus point in a museum as votive offerings on the altar of culture.

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