<iframe src="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-K3L4M3" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden">

Books

First ash dieback, then the world's scariest beetle

A review of The Ash Tree, by Oliver Rackham. A certain understandable I-told-you-so huffiness drives this analysis of the death of one of our prettiest common trees

4 October 2014

9:00 AM

4 October 2014

9:00 AM

The Ash Tree Oliver Rackham

Little Toller Books, pp.184, £15

The ash tree may lack the solidity of oak, the magnificence of beech or the ancient mystique of yew. In terms of habitat it may support fewer species of fauna, insect and fungus than other trees. It may, in this country at least, occupy a smaller cultural space than many of its woodland neighbours: according to Oliver Rackham, the combined works of Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Tennyson mention oak 134 times, pine 113 times and ash just 23.

Already a subscriber? Log in

Get 3 months of digital access, absolutely free

Subscribe to The Spectator Australia today to get the next 3 months of unlimited website and app access for free.

  • Full access to spectator.com.au and spectator.co.uk
  • The Spectator Australia app, on Apple and Android
  • Podcasts and newsletters, including Morning Double Shot
  • Our archive, going back to 1828
Or

Unlock this article

REGISTER

Available from the Spectator Bookshop, £13.50 Tel: 08430 600033. Philip Marsden’s Rising Ground: A Search for the Spirit of Place will be published next week.

You might disagree with half of it, but you’ll enjoy reading all of it. Try your first month for free, then just $2 a week for the remainder of your first year.


Comments

Get 3 months of digital access, absolutely free

Join the conversation with other Spectator Australia readers. Subscribe to leave a comment.

Already a subscriber? Log in

Close