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Features

Scots and English are the same people, with different accents. Why pretend otherwise?

Why are unionists so scared to talk about what unites us?

12 April 2014

9:00 AM

12 April 2014

9:00 AM

Sometimes it is easy to understand why countries break up. Some founder on the rocks of their internal contradictions. Others are historical conveniences that have simply run their course. Czechoslovakia was an artificial construct, a country with two languages and cultures, which split soon after the Iron Curtain fell. The division of Cyprus in 1974 marked the end of the fraternity between the island’s Turks and Greeks.

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Chris Deerin is a columnist for the Scottish Daily Mail.

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