Features

‘Money, money, money: where is morality?’: the Dalai Lama on David Cameron’s China policy

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

26 September 2015

8:00 AM

The Dalai Lama is a connoisseur of absurdity. When we met in London on Monday I reminded him that two years ago, desperate to resume relations with China, No. 10 said it had ‘turned the page on that issue,’ by which he meant the Dalai Lama. He responded with his celebrated chuckle but it became clear that he’s far from sanguine about being snubbed by Britain.

He agreed with me that not even Beijing could have thought up a phrase like ‘turn the page’. And in case Beijing didn’t get that craven message, Mr Cameron’s team spelt it out: the Prime Minister has ‘no plans’ to see the Dalai Lama again. In return, Beijing may agree to make London the offshore centre of choice for trading in its currency, the renminbi, and invest in our nuclear energy — a bad idea considering China’s dismal record in everything from high-speed trains to school buildings.

So on his nine-day tour to Britain, the 80-year-old Dalai Lama could not expect any hospitality from government ministers. Having become a political untouchable in Britain, as well as in China, what would he say to David Cameron if he were allowed anywhere near him? His answer was clear and simple: ‘Money, money, money. That’s what this is about. Where is morality?’


But he was quick to distinguish the approach of Mr Cameron’s government from the warm reception he has encountered in Britain (he has been to Oxford and Cambridge, and gave an address at the O2 Arena last weekend). ‘The British,’ he said, ‘are a moral people, greater than the Americans. But what I would say to Mr Cameron and to President Xi is that the Chinese are a great people, they have been so for thousands of years. But they could learn something from the Tibetans, who know there is more to life than material things.’

Xi Jinping, the president of China, is in America this week and will visit Britain next. There was a time when a British prime minister would raise the topic of human rights in Tibet — there is, after all, much to discuss. Just two years ago, Chinese troops opened fire on crowds celebrating the Dalai Lama’s 78th birthday. But with the page ‘turned’, any serious diplomatic challenge to Beijing is now highly unlikely.

The Dalai Lama described President Xi as a ‘serious, realistic man’ despite his ‘oppression of Tibetans and his own people’. ‘Mr Cameron should tell him, and I hope President Obama will too,’ he said. ‘Then there will be even wider material happiness in China.’

But such hard truths are unlikely to be on the agenda with Mr Xi. Britain, like most other countries, bends the knee and tugs the forelock to China’s diktats — and does so on Tibet, too. George Osborne, the Chancellor, wrote during his trip to Beijing this week: ‘We want a golden relationship with China that will help foster a golden decade for this country. Simply put, we want to make the UK China’s best partner in the West.’

Partner in what? With whom? China’s only Nobel Peace Prize winner, Liu Xiaobo, is serving an 11-year sentence for advocating free speech and democracy. This year alone, at least 250 lawyers and human rights activists have been targeted by police, with 20 still under detention. In Tibet, some 140 Buddhists have burnt themselves alive in protest against human rights abuses.

Once, Britain shone the spotlight on such issues. Now, in return for Chinese money, we keep quiet about what happens to Peace Prize winners, dissidents, lawyers, women seeking their rights, Buddhists and other minorities. What is astounding about the Dalai Lama is that, even while discussing the repression of the country from which he has been in exile since 1959, he remains cheerful. As he put it, ‘There are seven billion people in the world. There is much suffering. But there is happiness, too. That must be extended.’ To extend it requires not just money, but political will. To have turned the page on this realistic man is worse than immoral. It is stupid.

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Show comments
  • Gilbert White

    We need lots of money to look after the chancers pouring into our country for free things.

    • Sue Smith

      That will only be a scintilla of the problems you’re having and even less of those you are about to get.

    • Zhang Wei

      Britain is now an arse licker nation

  • Junius

    David Cameron has to live in the 21st-century and the real world, not an age when spiritual leaders were believed to be reborn, and their successors chosen by a conclave of Tibetan monks. Let’s face it, down the centuries meddlesome priests have been nothing but trouble. Think of Thomas Becket. Think of Thomas Cranmer. Think of Henry Sacheverell. They should all be treated with circumspection.

    And don’t get me started on morality. Here is Cicero, quoting Ennius:

    He that directs the wandering traveller,
    Doth, as it were, light another’s torch by his own;
    Which gives him ne’er the less of light, for that
    It gave another.

    In short, there is nothing wrong with helping others providing that by doing so you and your own do not lose out. Cicero bangs on at length about this in his Offices which will repay close attention, especially by the squeamish who reckon we should decline to trade with those of a less-than-acceptable human rights record.

    • lobotomisedjournalist

      More cowardly drivel. Yes, we can suck up to the Chinese to get them to bankroll us as a nation that can only produce financial leeches. Yes, we can keep our mouths shut when the people of Tibet are being hounded and oppressed and even call it pragmatism. The trouble is though, it makes us dispicable, self-serving, little nobodies without an ounce of integrity and no motivation to forge our own way to prosperity. We just become little blood suckers, sucking on the alpha dog.

  • Bonkim

    Was Tibet free under the Dalai Lama?

    • Karze

      There was very few prison which can be counted on finger tips when Dalai Lama ruled Tibet. Under China whole of Tibet has become prison.

      • Bonkim

        Tibet has existed as a vassal state of China for centuries. No different now. Tibet was ruled as a theocracy and people were largely illiterate and just did as they were told. China has brought enlightenment to Tibetans and cast the blanket of ignorant religion freeing people to choose modernity.

        • Richard Baranov

          Your statement is inaccurate. Tibet has never been a vassal state of China. On the contrary, traditionally the Dalai Lama has been the senior person in a partnership with the Emperor of China as his spiritual teacher. You will find that the Emperors obligation was to protect the Dalai Lama in return and it is from a misrepresentation of that relationship by the communist government that they pretend that Tibet is part of China. Historically and culturally, Tibet looks to India, racially and linguistically the Tibetans are not Chinese, their closest relatives are the Mongols and the language is a branch of the Tibeto-Burmese group. Tibet has been an independent country for a 1000 years and here is the proof

          http://www.claudearpi.net/maintenance/uploaded_pics/821822TreatybetweenTibetanChina.pdf

          The two stele that had this treaty carved onto them have been removed by the Communist Chinese. One stele was located at the bottom of the Potala palace in Lhasa, the other was located in Chang’an, the then capital of China.

          • Bonkim

            History of the region is sketchy – Budhism went from india and Budhist Monks had written Tibetan history. Evidence suggests Mongol and the Chinese Imperial power dominated the region since the rise of the Central Asian Khans and then the Eastern Chinese Empire. Indian history of the times was one of sporadic Islamic invasions and weak Indian rulers in Bihar/Bengal that was previously under the influence of the early Tibetan Empires.

            There is little doubt that the rising Chinese Empire was the dominant force on the Tibetan plateaux although social/religious affairs were largely looked after by the Budhist Monks with intervention from the Mongols and later Chinese imperial forces as the occasion arose.

            It is unwise to compare social conditions existing in the region (also in Europe) at the time and try to relate it to national sovereignty or freedoms as we understand the concepts today. Vast stretches on earth were under the influence/vasalage of the dominant powers that rose to prominence periodically. The Dalai Lama was no less a tyrant than the earthly rulers that held power in Tibet and other parts of Asia and Europe at the time. It was no different on the Indian subcontinent and South East Asia at the time.

          • lobotomisedjournalist

            I would be wary of dressing up partial knowledge as some sort of superior view. The Chinese relationship with Tibet has been complex, but it was never as brutal and disrespectful as it is today. To claim the Dalai Lamas were tyrants is simply not supported by reams of historical evidence – just do a little reading about the various individuals who have held the title. As Richard Baranov rightly claimed, the Dalai Lama is not and never was the ‘head of the Tibetan state’ nor was he always the highest spritual influence, even over the Gelukpas (just one of the sects) to which he belongs. He simply never had the power to even be a tyrant.

            Unfortunately, the Chinese are spreading a veil of lies over everything Tibetan (which can easily be disproved with only a little research). There are no serious tibetologists who follow their line. It is about power and the exploitation of resources – the Chinese want all Tibet’s resources and will do anything to get them – anything, including torture, rape and any other form of brutal inhuman behaviour – there is also plenty of evidence of this, if you care to look, just as there is plenty of evidence that they are quite prepared to brutalise their own people if it means maintaining the power structures of the Communist (ha, ha) party.

            We see the same thing today in the South China Sea – against all international law, the Chinese are just grabbing the lot – never mind the claims of other nations like Vietnam, the Philipines or Indonesia, they just don’t matter when it comes to the Chinese grabbing more power.

            No doubt all the China shills will now come out screaming.

          • Bonkim

            Not disagreeing but that is how power is exercised. No different the way the British Empire or US commercial interests expanded across the Globe. What you have to bear in mind is that those with power will exercise it for their benefit. It is difficult for us to sit today in judgement of history – even the English land tenure laws – at some time in history the land your house is built on changed ownership by force or some crooked deals. Human societies are forever in conflict with each other and the post WW2 consensus on human rights and morality only holds where societies willingly accept these – there are many parts of the Globe where such values are ignored/laughed at.

          • Richard Baranov

            Sorry but you are talking nonsense, the history is not “sketchy”, on the contrary, we have both Chinese, Tibetan and Napali documentation that makes that time in history no more sketchy than, lets say, 1066 and the Norman Invasion.

            The rest of what you write tells me that you read Chinese propaganda rather than history. The Chinese have not “Been a dominant force on the Tibetan plateau”, that’s simply nonsense.

            And “social/religious affairs were largely looked after by the Budhist Monks with intervention from the Mongols and later Chinese imperial forces as the occasion arose.
            ” Tells me that you haven’t a clue about the relationship of the Tibetans and Mongols, or the politics of Tibet. You are simply mindlessly cutting and pasting. The Chinese had nothing to do with it at all because the regime was not Chinese but Mongol/Manchu, hence Tibetan Buddhists. Tibet did not have a relationship with a Chinese government. It had a religious relationship with dynasties that were not Chinese and that, specifically, is whom the Tibetans had a relationship with, regimes that were an occupying force in China. With the overthrow of the Manchu and the instillation of a Chinese government that relationship ended. So I repeat, it has nothing to do with China at all and China’s claims are based on a false representation of the Tibetan/Mongol Manchu relationship falsely depicting it as Chinese dominance in Tibet omitting the rather salient fact that China itself was ruled by foreigners.

          • Bonkim

            You sound as if you were there to see all those centuries first hand. For me I have no problem China throwing away the cloak of ignorant religion dominating illiterate Yak herders by a few High Priests and bringing Tibet to the 20th century. Many Tibetans have seen the light and unlikely to follow the Dalai Lama even if by some magic he is allowed to go back to Tibet. Tibetan nationalism today is more of n ethnic variety and resentment of being dominated by Han Chinese. I am quite happy the Chinese are in control of Tibet and also the neighbouring Islam (another dark ages religion) dominated Xinjiang.

          • Richard Baranov

            In other word you are going to keep to your puerile and dishonest position despite the fact that your claims about Tibet are founded on no historical facts at all but a stream of misrepresentations and downright lies by the communist Chinese who are just grubby imperialistic invaders like any other.
            I speak Tibetan and can tell you that the number of Tibetans that welcome the Chinese into their country, including those born since the Chinese invasion, are miniscule, the Chinese are thoroughly detested by the Tibetans for the grubby imperialist invaders that they are. None of your sick left wing garbage will change that fact.
            The Tibetans in Tibet are treated in the same way as blacks were treated in South Africa by whites. But that’s OK isn’t it? All in the cause of the revolution. Sorry but people with your mentality inhabit a twisted sick little world motivated by ignorance and, it seems, an unjustified hatred for a peoples you obviously know nothing about and clearly have never met, quite frankly, people like you repel me.
            Tibet has the privilege of being the worlds largest prison camp, the entire city of Lhasa is surrounded by prison camps complete with torture courtesy of the Chinese government and you are so pathetic in your useless beliefs you think all of that is OK.

          • lukebc

            WHAT UTTER TRASH!

            “innocent” tibet was WHAT IS PRESENT “mighty india” BEFORE THE “evil commies” SHOWED UP: REPLETE WITH “innocent tibet” OF THE MOST FUCKED UP *CASTE SYSTEM INHERITED FROM (ACCORDING TO THE RSS VERMIN) “humane india”…….*

          • lobotomisedjournalist

            Are you incapable of making coherent points in a calm way? You seem to need either some meditation trainin,g or if your ignorance, hatred and grre are too far gone, just medication.

            Everything Richard Baranov wrote is factually correct, and anyone with an independent mind can do the research.

        • Karze

          In similar vein China is vassal of Mongolia – Yuan dynasty Kublai Khan was Mongol prince who was deputed to rule China. China also was under Japan 5 decade until end of Japan.

          During the same period Chinese too were illiterate. At least Tibetans didn’t die of starvation and famine before during the Dalai Lama rule as there enough while famine was norm in China during the much of Chinese history until Deng Xiopeng open and Western multinational helped China what is China today.

          Tibetans society lived a much better quality of life compared to Chinese before 1950.

          • Bonkim

            Yes power shifts through history. Many nations have disappeared or absorbed by more powerful ones. Nothing is for ever.

          • Karze

            So the Chinese govt’s statement that “Tibetan has been part of China for thousand of year is lies, lies …”.

          • Bonkim

            You can only talk about laws and justice if you have the power to enforce your will.

  • zanzamander

    Politics and morality have nothing to do with each other, in fact they’re at opposite ends. Politicians (and media, to a big extent) have no morals. Ok they might appear to be sincere, honest and even principled , look at Corbyn, but they swim in a sea of deceit where lying, cheating, backstabbing and thieving are the necessary tools of the trade.

    I think democracy actually forces immorality, hypocrisy and deceit onto the politicians (and media) because it survives on confrontation and competition where those who shout the loudest get heard, those who have money get elected.

    Look at US presidential race where candidates who cannot muster enough super PAC funds are doomed. I’m surprised they actually go through the sham of elections when counting who receives the most money in the end is then declared a winner would suffice just as well.

    But I digress. The fact of the matter is that we’re living in a world with dwindling resources and increasing population. Where the heady and intoxicating but ultimately destructive mix of religion and politics seems to be gaining ground. The Dalai Lama lives in the world that ceased to exist a few decades ago. With him the idea of a free Tibet will also die.

    You see there is nothing in return for politicians (and media) to support the Dalai Lama and a free Tibet. The transaction is not profitable.

  • Clive

    Politicians and morality should have nothing to do with each other. There will always be moral consequences flowing from political decisions but that does not mean that politicians should try to act in a ‘moral’ way.

    Politicians will find pseudo-moral justifications for their actions. The picture of the dead child informing immigration policy and the affair of Cameron and the dead pig negatively affecting his political future are both aspects of that reality. It is all of a piece with our political-moral pretence of which this piece is a fragment.

    In large measure, that is forced on the politicians by the media who are among the most amoral of all social forces. ‘Write us up to 1000 words on the Dalai Lama and China morality thing’. Mirsky gets paid, the Spectator gets circulation. A commercial transaction whose appearance is framed in morality.

    The role of the politician is the coherence of society. That does not mean they should maximise our wealth – which seems to be a ‘moral’ thing to do in Germany, say. Nor does it mean that they should make us look generous and kind, the face of Angela Merkel’s immigrant policy. Never mind that it also helps Germany’s terrible demographic problem which will itself have economic consequences.

    It is up to each member of society to use his/her own morality as s/he thinks fit. Our new found friendship with the Chinese abates that not one whit. We are at our most moral when we give collective moral help – through a coincidence of moral views held by individuals – to others voluntarily, not through the medium of government.

  • Faulkner Orkney

    “The Dalai Lama is a connoisseur of absurdity.”
    …no, he is the personification of it.
    Let’s stop respecting him as some great authority…like the ridiculous Pope-show currently playing in the USA, this is an unelected man sharing his delusions as if they were wisdom.

    • Richard Baranov

      On the contrary, to make such a sweeping statement such as yours, is the height of absurdity. You obviously know very little about what the Dalai Lama has done, what he represents to millions of people, or what his function is. In short your absurd statement is the product of ignorance, one of the very basic faults in thinking that according to Buddhist thought produces a lack of morals.

      • lukebc

        the “holy majesty” dalai lama has REINVENTED ITSELF CONSTANTLY over many decades……..

        • Clive

          Evidence ?

    • lobotomisedjournalist

      Are you some sort of Chinese shill, or just deeply ignorant? The Dalai Lama is about as intelligent and wise a person as this materialistic rat-race world will ever see. He has wit, irony and a razor insight into the depths that most political institutions can degrade themselves down to, whether it is the brutal oppression of the Chinese state, or the sychphantic greed of US and British politicians, and he can still smile and say kind words.

  • IainRMuir

    And what does Harry Potter think?

  • TashiDelek2all

    Tashi delek guys,

    I’m a Tibetan, which maybe you won’t believe me as we are on this thing called Internet. Being raised in a Tibetan community my whole life,
    too easy to tell that he was joking…He has been asked this q’s
    millions of times.

    C’mon ladies and gents…He was joking. Relax…..relax.

    Gari lab gorey tha…inji dhintso…migsel inji bhomo feminist dhintso la
    Go na ye reh

  • Allyup

    Can politics and morality share the same bed?

    • Bonkim

      You have to first define morality.

  • Jack Rocks

    Of course, a guy who’s never had to work a day in his life, to feed or cloth himself, would have a low opinion of money.

    • Bonkim

      But all Buddhist Monks are supposed to renounce worldly materialism and be supported by the working men and women in their community. Buddhism – no work, no responsibility but let others feed and clothe you – ancient life on benefits.

  • Zhang Wei

    The Dalai Lama should be assassinated.

    • “The Dalai Lama should be assassinated.”

      He was. The current Dalai Marxist is an impostor. Why do you think the Dalai Marxist maintains his silent concerning the upcoming fake collapse of the vanguard Communist government in Beijing! When the fake collapse occurs, the Dalai Marxist will refuse to call for verification investigations to determine if the collapse of the vanguard Communist government in Beijing is real or a strategic ruse.

    • Sponsz

      Zhang Wei should be assassinated.

    • lobotomisedjournalist

      Is that your compassionate side speaking?

  • How is it that the Dalai Marxist maintains his silence on the fake collapse of the USSR and East Bloc nations, as the following proves…

    The following is a discovery I made in April regarding the fake collapse of the USSR, and what that fraudulent collapse proves about the institutions of the West…

    When Soviet citizens were liberated from up to 74 years of horrific Marxist oppression on December 26, 1991 there were ZERO celebrations throughout the USSR, proving (1) the ‘collapse’ of the USSR is a strategic ruse; and (2) the political parties of the West were already co-opted by Marxists,* otherwise the USSR (and East Bloc nations) couldn’t have gotten away with the ruse.

    ZERO celebrations, as the The Atlantic article inadvertently informs us…

    http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2011/12/20-years-since-the-fall-of-the-soviet-union/100214/

    Notice, however, the Kremlin staged anti-government demonstrations that took place in Russia (and other Soviet republics) in the years immediately preceding the ‘collapse’, yet ZERO celebrations after the ‘collapse’!

    How is it that the Dalai Marxist maintains his silence on the preparations Beijing is making for its similar fake collapse of the vanguard Communist government…

    ‘Since at least the early 1970s, the Communist party of China has been poised to create a spectacular but controlled “democratization” at any appropriate time. The party had by then spent two decades consolidating its power, building a network of informants and agents that permeate every aspect of Chinese life, both in the cities and in the countryside. Government control is now so complete that it will not be seriously disturbed by free speech and democratic elections; power can now be exerted through the all-pervasive but largely invisible infrastructure of control. A transition to an apparently new system, using dialectical tactics, is now starting to occur.’ — Playing the China Card (The New American, Jan. 1, 1991).

    http://www.attacreport.com/ar_archives/art_na_china.htm

    ‘A campaign for a new system of World Government will be launched at Summit level and will be accompanied by pressure from below, the active use of agents of influence and secret assassinations of leaders who are seen as obstacles. The campaign will come as a surprise to the US Administration. In the ensuing negotiations, the US President of the day will find himself facing a combined pressure from the Russians and the Chinese. The Chinese will by then have adopted a ‘reformed’, pseudo-democratic system.’ — KGB Defector Major Anatoliy Golitsyn, “The Perestroika Deception”, April 1993, p. 166.

    http://www.spiritoftruth.org/The_Perestroika_Deception.pdf

    For more on this discovery see my blog…

    https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/

    Conclusion:

    The West will form new political parties where candidates are vetted for Marxist ideology, the use of the polygraph to be an important tool for such vetting. Then the West can finally liberate the globe of vanguard Communism.

    ————————-

    * The failed socialist inspired and controlled pan-European revolutions that swept the continent in 1848(1) thought Marxists and socialists a powerful lesson, that lesson being they couldn’t win overtly,(2) so they adopted the tactic of infiltration of the West’s political parties/institutions. In the case of the United States…(continue reading at DNotice)…

    https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/now-you-see-me-now-you-don-t

    Now you know why not one political party in the West requested verification of the collapse of the USSR, and the media failed to alert your attention to this fact, including the ‘alternative’ media. When determining whether the ‘former’ USSR is complying with arms control treaties, what does the United States do to confirm compliance? Right, the United States sends into the ‘former’ USSR investigative teams to VERIFY compliance, yet when it’s the fate of the West that’s at stake should the collapse of the USSR be a ruse, what does the United States do to confirm the collapse? Nothing!

    The fraudulent ‘collapse’ of the USSR (and East Bloc) couldn’t have been pulled off until both political parties in the United States (and political parties elsewhere in the West) were co-opted by Marxists, which explains why verification of the ‘collapse’ was never undertaken by the West, such verification being (1) a natural administrative procedure (since the USSR wasn’t occupied by Western military forces); and (2) necessary for the survival of the West. Recall President Reagan’s favorite phrase, “Trust, but verify”.

    It gets worse–the ‘freed’ Soviets and West also never (1) de-Communized the Soviet Armed Forces of its Communist Party officer corps, which was 90% officered by Communist Party members; and (2) arrested/de-mobilized the 6-million vigilantes that assisted the Soviet Union’s Ministry of the Interior and police control the populations of the larger cities during the period of ‘Perestroika’ (1986-1991)!

    There can be no collapse of the USSR (or East Bloc nations) without…

    Verification, De-Communization and De-mobilization.

    The West never verified the collapse of the USSR because no collapse occurred, since if a real collapse had occurred the West would have verified it, since the survival of the West depends on verification. Conversely, this proves that the political parties of the West were co-opted by Marxists long before the fraudulent collapse of the USSR, since the survival of the West depends on verification.

    The above means that the so-called ‘War on Terror’ is an operation being carried out by the Marxist co-opted governments of the West in alliance with the USSR and other Communist nations, the purpose being to (1) destroy the prominence of the West in the eyes of the world, where the West is seen (i) invading nations without cause; (ii) causing chaos around the globe; and (iii) killing over one-million civilians and boasting of torture; (2) close off non-Russian supplies of oil for export, thereby increasing the price of oil, the higher price allowing oil exporting Russia to maintain economic stability while she modernizes and increases her military forces; (3) destroy the United States Armed Forces via the never-ending ‘War on Terror’; the ultimate purpose of the aforementioned to (4) bring about the demise of the United States in the world, opening up a political void to be filled by a new pan-national entity composed of Europe and Russia (replacing the European Union), a union ‘From the Atlantic to Vladivostok’; which will (5) see the end of NATO.

    Now you know how Bolshevik Russia survived in 1917; how the West ‘lost’ China to the Communists in 1949; why the Eisenhower administration turned a deaf ear to the anti-Communist Hungarian uprising in 1956; why the Eisenhower administration in 1959 was indifferent to the Castro brothers’ Communist fidelity, actually used the CIA to overthrow the Batista government; why the Nixon administration abandoned Taiwan for Communist China, and signed treaties/provided economic aid to the USSR; why the Nixon administration refused to tell the American People that over 50% of North Vietnamese NVA regiments were actually Chinese People’s Liberation Army soldiers (attired in NVA uniforms, and proving that the Sino/Soviet Split was a ruse, as KGB defector Major Anatoliy Golitsyn told the West back in 1962), thereby (1) ensuring the Vietnam War would be lost; (2) destroying the prominence of the United States abroad and at home; (3) breeding distrust between the American people and their government; and (4) securing Communist victories in Southeast Asia. Working in the background within the political parties of the United States and Great Britain were Marxist agents doing their best to (1) ensure the survival of Communist nations when they popped up; and (2) sabotage any policies that would bring down a Communist nation. That’s why after the fake collapses of the East Bloc nations and USSR there was no mandatory Western verification process to ensure the Communists weren’t still in control.

    • lobotomisedjournalist

      Keep posting the same old nonsense, and keep taking the meds if it keeps you out of trouble.

      • “keep taking the meds if it keeps you out of trouble.”

        I am. I’m taking the red pill Morpheus offered me, which allows me to see a picture of Lenin’s head and four Soviet nationality emblems next to the masthead of the Russian Ministry of Defense’s official newspaper, which is STILL called “Red Star”…

        http://www.redstar.ru/

        I’m also now capable of seeing the Communist Party of the Soviet Union’s emblem–the distinctive Soviet Red Star emblem–still on Russian military aircraft and naval vessels…

        http://www.airliners.net/photo/Russia—Air/Sukhoi-Su-25SM/1606418/L/

        http://flashtrafficblog.wordpress.com/2013/06/08/9225/

        I also see the thousands of hated statues to Lenin still standing in Russian cities, towns and villages…

        http://www.saint-petersburg.com/monuments/ploshchad-lenina/

        The red pill also allows one to comprehend the meaning of the following…

        ‘The West never verified the collapse of the USSR because no collapse occurred, since if a real collapse had occurred the West would have verified it, since the survival of the West depends on verification. Conversely, this proves that the political parties of the West were co-opted by Marxists long before the fraudulent collapse of the USSR, since the survival of the West depends on verification.’

        …and…

        When Soviet citizens were liberated from up to 74 years of horrific Marxist oppression on December 26, 1991 there were ZERO celebrations throughout the USSR, proving (1) the “collapse” of the USSR was a strategic ruse; and (2) the political parties of the West were already co-opted by Marxists, otherwise the USSR (and East Bloc nations) couldn’t have gotten away with the ruse.

        Would you like me to ask Morpheus to contact you, so that you too may take the red pill and disconnect yourself from the Matrix?

  • Ani Jangchub Lhamo

    Well, Mr. Cameron should remember that he is also a suspicious minority. 1966. A Firehorse. Had he been born a bit more east, he might not have survived a watery death. Those Firehorses…much, much more untrustworthy that those annoying “Dalai splittists” Let’s see how the October 9, 1966 Mr. Cameron fares with Mr. Xi. Not well, I will assume. Happy pre-birthday from a fellow Firehorse.

  • Matthew O’Malley

    Why the shock? Sycophancy to a superpower? Britain has been in thrall to the United States for the last 60 years as our own power has declined, equally quick to ignore their many transgressions and human rights abuses. Now that our emphasis has changed to China it becomes untenable?

  • Junius

    We’ve had this discussion once, 25 days ago. Why is it being repeated? But since it is, here is my regurgitated reply.

    David Cameron has to live in the 21st-century and the real world, not an age when spiritual leaders were believed to be reborn, and their successors chosen by a conclave of Tibetan monks. Let’s face it, down the centuries meddlesome priests have been nothing but trouble. Think of Thomas Becket. Think of Thomas Cranmer. Think of Henry Sacheverell. They should all be treated with circumspection.

    And don’t get me started on morality. Here is Cicero, quoting Ennius:

    He that directs the wandering traveller,
    Doth, as it were, light another’s torch by his own;
    Which gives him ne’er the less of light, for that
    It gave another.

    In short, there is nothing wrong with helping others providing that by doing so you and your own do not lose out. Cicero bangs on at length about this in his Offices which will repay close attention, especially by the squeamish who reckon we should decline to trade with those of a less-than-acceptable human rights record.

    • Abie Vee

      What a feeble apologia. It’s not often one reads such puerile claptrap.

      Tell me, this “real world” of yours, this world of consumer fetishism, self aggrandizement and obscene wealth cheek by jowl with obscene poverty… has in no soul?

      The cost of living in a materialist world like yours, this world based on ego-values, is to forget to ask the question: “What is it for?”

      • Junius

        Had this comment come from almost anyone else, someone whose upvotes exceeded their comment tally, I might be a tad abashed. I might even spend some time composing a measured response.

        But it doesn’t; so I’m not. Go chase yourself.

        • Abie Vee

          Do you think I seek plaudits? How quaint. How amusing.

          I’m on this right-wing site as an unapologetic life-long committed Socialist. That I get even one up-vote in this culvert, let alone thousands, is something of a miracle. Wouldn’t you say?

  • Gilbert White

    Well the problem should be a UN problem. Agreed Tibet and Papua New Guinea are really the sort of criminal exploitive colonialisms that would make the hardiest of Victorian adventurers blush. We live in a material world however guided by intellectuals like Corbyn and Madonna. Curious how the gaggle of SE Asian states leave it for The US to get tough in that next bone of contention in the South China Seas? If the UN is not fit cast it out?

    • Abie Vee

      Yes. I dare say they should shoot a few arrows at the American armada.

      You may live in a material world, for now at least. It’s very easy to be fatalistic about things when you’re sitting comfortably, isn’t it?

  • Da Huzi

    China’s “dismal record” in high-speed rail is one major accident, with about 40 casualties, four years ago. China now has more HSR than every other country in the world, and it services about three million passengers a day. China has many faults, but singling out HSR is absurd – riding HR in China is statistically about as dangerous as drinking a glass of cold water.

    • criticalobserver

      I agree with you that “singling out HSR is absurd- riding HR in China is statistically as dangerous as drinking a glass of cold water”.
      An article in the New York Times by Badsher two years ago reported that travelling on China’s HSR is as safe as air travel, which hitherto is regarded as the safest form of transport.

  • criticalobserver

    “Money, money, money where is the morality ? Dalai Lama.
    Dear Dalai Lama, Money, money, money from the CIA, where is the morality ?

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